The Ties that Bind

What factors explain the dramatic changes in union formation we have observed over recent decades?Edited by Linda J. Waite. Co-edited by Christine Bachrach, Michelle Hindin, Elizabeth Thomson, and Arland Thornton.

The Ties that Bind

The Ties That Bindwas organized to review and assess the scientific evidence about the causes of trends in marriage and other forms of intimate unions. The contributors address these two questions: What do we know about the factors that influence the formation of marriages and other intimate unions, the timing of union formation, and the forms that unions take? What factors explain the dramatic changes in union formation we have observed over recent decades?Edited by Linda J. Waite. Co-edited by Christine Bachrach, Michelle Hindin, Elizabeth Thomson, and Arland Thornton.

Marriage and Cohabitation in Contemporary Societies

"An international and interdisciplinary study."--T.p.

Marriage and Cohabitation in Contemporary Societies

"An international and interdisciplinary study."--T.p.

Cohabitation an Alternative to Marriage

Despite its recent rapid increase, one should not overlook the fact that cohabitation, in comparison with legal marriage, remains an alternative practiced by a minority of the couples at any ?oint in time.

Cohabitation  an Alternative to Marriage

1. BACKGROUND In the last ten years there has been much popular discus sion and also a great scholarly interest in the so-called "alternative lifestyles" (1). ESgecially, since the late 1J60's, a diversity of lifestyles other than the nuclear family began to emerge, according to demographic changes in household compositions during the past decade (US Bureau of Census, 1979; Centraal Bureau voor de Statistiek, 1930). One lifestyle, non-marital cohabitation, has increased most dra matically during the ~ast ten years and is the subject of this study. The term cohabitation will be used exclusively throughout the remainder of this study to refer to hetero sexual couples who are living together without being married legally. Despite its recent rapid increase, one should not overlook the fact that cohabitation, in comparison with legal marriage, remains an alternative practiced by a minority of the couples at any ?oint in time. For the Netherlands, it is estimated that 7 percent of all couples are living together unmarried, and 93 percent are married (Straver, 1981). This cohabitation rate is about twice as low when compared to rates in countries like Sweden and Denmark where they are 16 percent (the highest rate in Europe) and 13 percent (Trost, 1979), but still about twice as high when compared to the 3 percent estimate for the United States (Macklin, 1980).

Marriage and Cohabitation

This is nearly twice as high as the one- quarter of people without precohabitation marriage plans and without thoughts of cohabitation being a trial for marriage who went on to marry. Adding together those with precohabitation marriage ...

Marriage and Cohabitation

In an era when half of marriages end in divorce, cohabitation has become more commonplace and those who do get married are doing so at an older age. So why do people marry when they do? And why do some couples choose to cohabit? A team of expert family sociologists examines these timely questions in Marriage and Cohabitation, the result of their research over the last decade on the issue of union formation. Situating their argument in the context of the Western world’s 500-year history of marriage, the authors reveal what factors encourage marriage and cohabitation in a contemporary society where the end of adolescence is no longer signaled by entry into the marital home. While some people still choose to marry young, others elect to cohabit with varying degrees of commitment or intentions of eventual marriage. The authors’ controversial findings suggest that family history, religious affiliation, values, projected education, lifetime earnings, and career aspirations all tip the scales in favor of either cohabitation or marriage. This book lends new insight into young adult relationship patterns and will be of interest to sociologists, historians, and demographers alike.

Marriage and Cohabitation

Even the minority who are opposed to marriage, either for reasons of principle or because of practical disillusionment, are in effect practising a variety of a marriage. Cohabitation is experienced as an adequate way of conducting ...

Marriage and Cohabitation

The law has long been interested in marriage and conjugal cohabitation and in the range of public and private obligations that accrue from intimate living. This collection of classic articles explores that legal interest, while at the same time locating marriage and cohabitation within a range of intimate affiliations. It offers the perspectives of a number of international scholars on questions of how, if at all, our different ways of intimacy ought to be recognised and regulated by law.

The Ring Makes All the Difference

Science, reason, and history are also on our side. In this excellent book, my friend Glenn Stanton explains how all of these roads point to the importance of marriage.” ~ Jim Daly, president – Focus on the Family “LOVED this book!

The Ring Makes All the Difference

Why not cohabitate? Many believe nothing is better for their future marriage than a trial period—cohabitation. It’s the fastest growing family type in the U.S. So how’s that working out? Are people truly happier? Author Glenn Stanton offers a compelling factual case that nearly every area of health and happiness is increased by marriage and decreased by cohabitation. With credible data and compassion, Stanton explores the reasons why the cohabitation trend is growing; outlines its negative outcomes for men, women, and children; and makes a case for why marriage is still the best arrangement for the flourishing of couples and society. This resource is ideal for those who are cohabitating or considering it, as well as pastors and counselors who need to be able to engage this issue.

Marriage and Cohabitation

This book lends new insight into young adult relationship patterns and will be of interest to sociologists, historians, and demographers alike.

Marriage and Cohabitation

In an era when half of marriages end in divorce, cohabitation has become more commonplace and those who do get married are doing so at an older age. So why do people marry when they do? And why do some couples choose to cohabit? A team of expert family sociologists examines these timely questions in Marriage and Cohabitation, the result of their research over the last decade on the issue of union formation. Situating their argument in the context of the Western world’s 500-year history of marriage, the authors reveal what factors encourage marriage and cohabitation in a contemporary society where the end of adolescence is no longer signaled by entry into the marital home. While some people still choose to marry young, others elect to cohabit with varying degrees of commitment or intentions of eventual marriage. The authors’ controversial findings suggest that family history, religious affiliation, values, projected education, lifetime earnings, and career aspirations all tip the scales in favor of either cohabitation or marriage. This book lends new insight into young adult relationship patterns and will be of interest to sociologists, historians, and demographers alike.

Family Law Challenges in a Changing Society

In the book “A practical treatise on the law of marriage and divorce“, Leonard Shelford explains that “Marriage, in its origin, is a contract of natural law antecedent to its becoming in civil society a civil contract, regulated and ...

Family Law Challenges in a Changing Society

Research Paper (undergraduate) from the year 2014 in the subject Law - Civil / Private / Family Law / Law of Succession, grade: A - Excellent, University of Hertfordshire, course: Independent Legal Study, language: English, abstract: There are many ways to define marriage and there are numerous perspectives on which these definitions can be based. Every country or even state has its own legal definition, each culture will have its own cultural and sociological definition, religions will have their own religious definitions and even each era will has its own anthropological definition. The British anthropologist Eleanor Kathleen Gough Aberle defined marriage in 1959 as „a relationship established between a woman and one or more other persons, which provides that a child born to the woman under circumstances not prohibited by the rules of the relationship, is accorded full birth-status rights common to normal members of his society or social stratum.” For statistical purposes the United Nations have recommended the following definition: „the legal union of persons of opposite sex. The legality of the union may be established by civil, religious, or other means as recognised by the laws of each country; and irrespective of the type of marriage, each should be reported for vital statistics purposes.” It is particularly interesting that the United Nations have added the word “legal” to their definition which provides the institution of marriage with a legal dimension. In the book “A practical treatise on the law of marriage and divorce“, Leonard Shelford explains that “Marriage, in its origin, is a contract of natural law antecedent to its becoming in civil society a civil contract, regulated and prescribed by law and endowed with civil consequences.” However, the past decades have experienced a decline in marriages amongst the British population as well as a substantial increase of cohabiting partners, who share the same domicile without having some form of contract governing the relationship. This has given rise to various approaches as to how relationships and families in particular are to be regulated. The following discussion will begin by taking a look at the current situation in England and Wales. Hereafter, points 3 and 4 will provide a theoretical foundation of the development of marriage and families as well as laws and justice. Finally, the last two points will discuss the recommended reform of the laws governing cohabitation and the current marriage scepticism which is growing in feminist and liberal jurisprudence.

Cohabitation and Religious Marriage

Illuminating pressing implications for social policy, this is an invaluable resource for policy makers, practitioners, researchers and students of family law.

Cohabitation and Religious Marriage

Cohabiting couples and those entering religious-only marriages all too often end up with inadequate legal protection when the relationship ends. Yet, despite this shared experience, the linkages and overlaps between these two groups have largely been ignored in the legal literature. Based on wide-ranging empirical studies, this timely book brings together scholars working in both areas to explore the complexities of the law, the different ways in which individuals experience and navigate the existing legal framework and the potential solutions for reform. Illuminating pressing implications for social policy, this is an invaluable resource for policy makers, practitioners, researchers and students of family law.

Cohabiting Married Or Single

This work asks if we are observing a cultural change leading to the dissolution of the family, as we see marriage declining, divorce rising, fertility dropping and children born to single mothers increasing.

Cohabiting  Married  Or Single

This work asks if we are observing a cultural change leading to the dissolution of the family, as we see marriage declining, divorce rising, fertility dropping and children born to single mothers increasing. However, it suggests, we may merely be seeing a shift from marriage to cohabitation.

The Changing Legal Regulation of Cohabitation

This book is for anyone interested in the history of marriage and cohabitation, whether historian, lawyer or general reader.

The Changing Legal Regulation of Cohabitation

This book is for anyone interested in the history of marriage and cohabitation, whether historian, lawyer or general reader. It is written in an accessible style, while providing a radical reassessment of existing ideas about the popularity, legal treatment and perceptions of cohabitation between 1600 and 2010.

Living Together

The founders of such marriage counseling organizations as Mentor Couples and Community Marriage Policies argue that cohabitation without marriage is not an appropriate test of a relationship, explaining how such living environments result ...

Living Together

The founders of such marriage counseling organizations as Mentor Couples and Community Marriage Policies argue that cohabitation without marriage is not an appropriate test of a relationship, explaining how such living environments result in ill-preparedness for long-term commitment and higher divorce rates. 50,000 first printing.

Marriage Cohabitation and Men s Use of Preventive Health Care Services

Marriage and cohabitation were related to men's use of health care . Among men aged 18-64 , those who were married ( 76.3 % ) were more likely than cohabiting men ( 60.3 % ) and other not - married men ( 65.1 % ) to have had a health ...

Marriage  Cohabitation  and Men s Use of Preventive Health Care Services


Marriage in an Age of Cohabitation

Sociologists Maureen Baker and Vivienne Elizabeth present a cutting-edge discussion of contemporary ideas about marriage and living together.

Marriage in an Age of Cohabitation

In the past few decades, legal marriage rates have declined in the Western world. Many heterosexual and same-sex couples today are living together or cohabitating for several years before tying the knot. The changing nature of intimate relationships and the very meaning of marriage have resulted in a period of extended intimate partnership that may - or may not - result in marriage. Sociologists Maureen Baker and Vivienne Elizabeth present a cutting-edge discussion of contemporary ideas about marriage and living together. They explore the reasons why certain couples who cohabitate eventually decide to formalize their long-term relationship, and whether formalization actually makes a difference for the couple and those around them. While the decision to marry has evolved from previous generations, so have the practices surrounding wedding rituals. The authors discuss aspects of the wedding industry, examining which traditions couples are retaining and which they are personalizing, such as writing non-patriarchal vows and sharing personal stories about their relationship. The authors also compare the cohabitation and wedding rituals practiced by same-sex and different-sex couples. Baker and Elizabeth draw on a wide range of international studies - from Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States - as well as their own research, in which they interviewed marriage celebrants and long-term cohabitants who are heterosexual and gay/lesbian, aged from 28 to 63, and from a variety of social backgrounds. The result is a fascinating, multi-generational study of the lives of couples around the world as they negotiate their relationships in the twenty-first century.

Cohabitation Marriage and the Law

The chapter shows that misinformation cannot explain the dramatic rise in cohabitation, if only because those who do not believe in common law marriage behave in almost exactly the same way. Nor are cohabitants less committed than ...

Cohabitation  Marriage and the Law

Unmarried heterosexual cohabitation is rapidly increasing in Britain and over a quarter of children are now born to unmarried cohabiting parents. This is not just an important change in the way we live in modern Britain; it is also a political and theoretical marker. Some commentators see cohabitation as evidence of selfish individualism and the breakdown of the family, while others see it as just a less institutionalised way in which people express commitment and build their families. Politically, 'stable' families are seen as crucial - but does stability simply mean marriage? At present the law in Britain retains important distinctions in the way it treats cohabiting and married families and this can have deleterious effects on the welfare of children and partners on cohabitation breakdown or death of a partner. Should the law be changed to reflect this changing social reality? Or should it - can it - be used to direct these changes? Using findings from their recent Nuffield Foundation funded study, which combines nationally representative data with in-depth qualitative work, the authors examine public attitudes about cohabitation and marriage, provide an analysis of who cohabits and who marries, and investigate the extent and nature of the 'common law marriage myth' (the false belief that cohabitants have similar legal rights to married couples). They then explore why people cohabit rather than marry, what the nature of their commitment is to one another and chart public attitudes to legal change. In the light of this evidence, the book then evaluates different options for legal reform.

Cohabitation Marriage Marital Dissolution and Remarriage

All ages . the trends in cohabitation , marriage , Table 1. Number of women 15-44 years of age and percent who cohabited before divorce , and remarriage . marriage , ever cohabited , and ever married , by race , age , and Hispanic ...

Cohabitation  Marriage  Marital Dissolution  and Remarriage


Cohabitation

addresses before marriage.59 The figures are higher for second marriages: in 1992, 86% of British women cohabited prior to their ... Pre-marital cohabitation may tend to be shorter than cohabitation that does not result in marriage.

Cohabitation

This consultation paper considers options for reform of the current law in relation to the property and financial rights of cohabiting couples (either opposite-sex or same-sex couples) when a relationship ends. Although the paper does discuss the situation in relation to when one of the partners dies, it focuses on whether a new scheme is needed to provide financial remedies on separation when a relationship breaks down. Amongst the provisional proposals, the Committee identifies the need for the introduction of new statutory remedies to address the separation of cohabiting couples who have children; however the situation for cohabitants without children is found to raise more difficult social policy questions and the views of consultees are sought about their eligibility within the proposed scheme. Other proposals include: that courts should be given discretion in determining financial claims on separation (rather than having fixed rules for property division) based on principles of the contributions of both parties to the joint household and to the welfare of dependent children both before and after separation; with the provision for an opt-out agreement for couples under the proposed statutory scheme. Responses to the proposals should be received by 30th September 2006 and a final report is due to be published by August 2007. An overview document summarising the key issues considered is available separately (ISBN 011730266X).

Living Together

In this much-needed book, experienced pastor and counselor Jeff VanGoethem provides solid help for both the pastoral and professional counselor.

Living Together

Offers a biblical perspective on the explosive and growing social phenomena of couples moving in together instead of marrying and – a common trend even among Christian couples. Full of biblical, practical,and competent help for those who minister to and counsel unwed couples.