Mass Loss from Red Giants

The pulsation can not by itself produce significant mass loss rates. Radiation pressure acting on grains in the atmosphere of the static red giant models is also incapable of producing significant mass loss rates. Pulsation enhances ...

Mass Loss from Red Giants

Red giant and supergiant stars have long been favorites of professional 6 and amateur astronomers. These enormous stars emit up to 10 times more energy than the Sun and, so, are easy to study. Some of them, specifically the pulsating long-period variables, significantly change their size, brightness, and color within about a year, a time scale of interest to a single human being. Some aspects of the study of red giant stars are similar to the study of pre-main-sequence stars. For example, optical astronomy gives us a tantalizing glimpse of star forming regions but to really investi gate young stars and protostars requires infrared and radio astronomy. The same is true of post-main-sequence stars that are losing mass. Optical astronomers can measure the atomic component of winds from red giant stars that are undergoing mass loss at modest rates 6 (M $ 10- M9/yr.). But to see dust grains and molecules properly, 5 especially in stars with truly large mass loss rates, ~ 10- M9/yr, one requires IR and radio astronomy. As this stage of copious mass loss only lasts for ~105 years one might be tempted to ask, "who cares?".

Evolution of Peculiar Red Giant Stars

MASS - LOSING PECULIAR RED GIANTS : OBSERVATIONS M. Jura Department of Astronomy University of California Los Angeles CA 90024 THE COMPARISON BETWEEN THEORY AND ABSTRACT O It seems that The mass loss from evolved red giants is ...

Evolution of Peculiar Red Giant Stars

Red giant stars are evolutionarily advanced objects in the closing stages of their nuclear burning lifetime. Observed with increasing spectral coverage they display a variety of unusual phenomena. Many are characterized by peculiar (non-solar) surface chemical compositions which provide otherwise unobtainable clues to interior nucleosynthesis, mixing and evolution. Others may have received their chemical peculiarities by mass transfer from a companion. This book reports on the proceedings of the International Astronomical Union Colloquium 106. It contains discussions on many aspects of these stars, combining theory and observation to interpret these objects in terms of their evolutionary history. There are 20 review papers, 69 abstracts and short contributed papers and a complete transcript of the valuable summary panel discussion. Professional astronomers will find this book useful as a reference work which incorporates current research on the modelling and evolution of these unstable stars.

Literature 1985 Part 2

Mass loss from red giants, p. 149 – 150 (1985). – See Abstr. 012.028. 112.041 SiS in circumstellar shells. R. Sahai, A. Wootten, R. E. S. Clegg. Mass loss from red giants, p. 151 – 152 (1985) – See Abstr. 012.028.

Literature 1985  Part 2

Astronomy and Astrophysics Abstracts aims to present a comprehensive documen tation ofthe literatme concerning all aspects of astronomy, astrophysics, and their border fields. lt is devoted to the recording, summarizing, and indexing of the relevant publications throughout the world. Astronomy and Astrophysics Abstracts is prepared by a special department of the Astronomisches Rechen-Institut under the auspices of the International Astronomical Union. Volume 40 records literatme published in 1985 and received before February 15, 1986. Some older documents which we received late and which arenot surveyed in earlier volumes are included too. We acknowledge with thanks contributions of our colleagues all over the world. We also express our gratitude to all organiza tions, observatories, and publishers which provide us with complimentary copies of their publications. Starting with Volume 33, all the recording, correction, and data processing work was dorre by means of computers. The recording was dorre by om technical staff members Ms. Helga Ballmann, Ms. Mona El-Choura (t), Ms. Monika Kohl, Ms. Sylvia Matyssek. Ms. Karirr Burkhardt, Ms. Susanne Schlötelbmg, Mr. Mar tin Schlötelburg, and Mr. Stefan Wagner supported om task by careful proof reading. lt is a pleasure to thank them all for their encomagement.

Physical Processes in Red Giants

EVOLUTIONARY COMPUTATIONS Evolutionary models of massive stars through core He-exhaust i on stage in presence of mass loss by stellar wind have been computed by sever all authors. The current status of the subject has been recently ...

Physical Processes in Red Giants

In recent years, it has become clear that the red-giant phase is one of the most dramatic periods in a star's life, when all of its parts become involved in ways that have both direct and indirect observational consequences. This is most particularly true of low- and intermediate mass stars during the second ascent of the giant branch. Such stars bring to their surfaces products of nucleosynthesis currently taking place in their deep interiors, they pulsate as Mira variables, develop extended outward-flowing atmospheres that may exhibit maser properties, and shed great quantities of matter, sometimes highly processed, into the inter stellar medium. The manner in which processed matter is brought to the surface is far from being completely explained, and the precise mechanism or mechanisms whereby matter is ejected from the stellar surface (whether by deposition of Alfven waves, radiation pressure on grains, or as a consequence of so me large scale envelope instability) has yet to be elucidated to every one's satisfaction. The purpose of the second workshop in Astrophysics, organized by the "Advanced School of Astronomy", was to bring together experts on all the physical processes occurring in red giants in an effort to emphasize the interrelatedness of these individual processes, and to encourage a dia logue among experts that might serve to initiate a synthesis, or at least sharpen our understanding of the most important problems to address in the future.

Problems in Stellar Atmospheres and Envelopes

Consequences for Stellar Evolution The empirical mass-loss formula j = 4. 10-13 L/g-R comprises our present knowledge about mass loss from population I red giants. By application of this relation, the relative mass loss in one ...

Problems in Stellar Atmospheres and Envelopes


Literature 1981 Part 1

065.103 Mass loss from massive stars throughout the HR diagram. C. Chiosi. Physical processes in red giants, (see 012,056), p. 183 - 189 (1981). The current status of the evolution of massive stars undergoing mass loss by stellar winds ...

Literature 1981  Part 1


Mass Loss from Stars

Most single stars leaving the main sequence in unit time have masses in the range 1–2 Mø, and very likely most of these do become white dwarfs. Some of the requisite mass loss is known to occur in the red-giant evolutionary stage.

Mass Loss from Stars

Proceedings from the Second Trieste Colloquium on Astrophysics, September 12-17, 1968

Late Stages of Stellar Evolution

The coming into importance of neutrino energy loss process in this mass range could make a crucial difference: neutrino ... In practice these seem to come down to radiation pressure driven mass loss for red giants, pulsation driven mass ...

Late Stages of Stellar Evolution

lAD Symposium No. 66 was held in Warsaw from September 10th to September 12th 1973, in connection with the Extraordinary General Assembly of the lAD. It was arranged by lAD Symposium No. 35 and the Scientific Organising Committee con sisted of A. G. Massevitch (Chairman), A. V. Tutukov (Secretary), H. M. van Horn, N. Dallaporta, J. P. Ostriker, B. Paczynski, G. Ruben, E. Schatzman, R. J. Tayler and A. Weigert. This volume contains the full texts of all of the invited papers presented at the Symposium, apart from that delivered by R. P. Kraft, which is published in abstract because it is appearing in full elsewhere. In addition the short communications given at the Symposium are published in abstract. I attempted to take down all of the dis cussion as it occurred and all contributors to the discussion were asked to provide copies of their remarks. From these sources an edited version of the discussion has been produced. As the final version has not been seen by the contributors, I should be held responsible for all errors. At Warsaw, some of the short communications did not immediately follow the invited paper to which they referred. In the printed version they and any discussion relating to them are placed in the most logical position. A small number of short communications, which were circulated in abstract at Warsaw but which were not delivered orally, are also included in the published version.

The Influence of Mass Loss on the Evolution of a Red Giant Star of 5 Solar Masses

loss is actually in progress , it is hard to see how the model could preserve any " recollection " of these differences after the mass loss has ceased . But this is quite possibly untrue if the mass - loss rates are many times higher ...

The Influence of Mass Loss on the Evolution of a Red Giant Star of 5 Solar Masses


Mass Losing Pulsating Stars and their Circumstellar Matter

With this luminosity and temperature, it is possible that L2 Pup is either a first ascent red giant or an Asymptotic Giant Branch Star (Lattanzio 1991, Girardi et al. 2000). Because of its inferred space motion near 90 km s' (Feast ...

Mass Losing Pulsating Stars and their Circumstellar Matter

Editing the proceedings of a scientific meeting is not an easy task. Sometimes people who give an excellent talk do not send the manuscript by the deadline. However, this time, thanks to the punctuality of all the participants, we have this excellent volume for the workshop on mass losing pulsating stars and their circumstellar matter prepared in time. Almost all of the oral presentations including the summary are collected in this volume. We regret that we cannot put in this volume a few posters that we failed to receive before the editorial work. The workshop was planned as a small meeting with less than fifty attendants because the city of Sendai was far from the most of the active institutions. However, the number of submitted papers exceeded the SOC's expectation; many interesting contributions had to be scheduled in the poster session. Still, the oral sessions were so tight that many participants might have felt frustrated for the shortage of discussions. The organizers of the workshop have to apologize to the attendants for the inconvenience caused from such a happy underestimate about the size of the workshop.

Nuclear Science Abstracts

Mass losses from red giants are rediscussed on the basis of new observations . ... A compilation of all available data shows that mass loss from red giants varies with basic stellar parameters as M [ Mo / yr ] = 4.10-13 L / g⚫R ( solar ...

Nuclear Science Abstracts


Encyclopedia of Astronomy Astrophysics

Understanding mass loss from the cool component relies on optical, near-IR and radio observations. Several symbiotics have red giants that fill their Roche lobes and lose mass tidally at high rates. Most symbiotic red giants underfill ...

Encyclopedia of Astronomy   Astrophysics

In a unique collaboration, Nature Publishing Group and Institute of Physics Publishing have published the most extensive and comprehensive reference work in astronomy and astrophysics. This unique resource covers the entire field of astronomy and astrophysics and this online version includes the full text of over 2,750 articles, plus sophisticated search and retrieval functionality and links to the primary literature. The Encyclopaedia's authority is assured by editorial and advisory boards drawn from the world's foremost astronomers and astrophysicists. This first class resource is an essential source of information for undergraduates, graduate students, researchers and seasoned professionals, as well as for committed amateurs, librarians and lay people wishing to consult the definitive astronomy and astrophysics reference work.

In Quest of the Universe

The solar wind carries away about 10'14 of the Sun's mass each year. This is an extremely small amount, for at this rate, the Sun will lose only 0.01% of its mass in 10 billion years. Mass loss is much more important for red giants.

In Quest of the Universe

Every new copy of In Quest of the Universe, Seventh Edition print textbook includes access to the Companion WebsiteDesigned for the nonscience major, In Quest of the Universe, Seventh Edition provides a comprehensive, accessible introduction to astronomy, while taking students on an exciting trek through our solar system and beyond. Updated throughout with the latest findings in this fast-paced field, the author unfolds historical and contemporary theories in astronomy to provide a clear account of how the science works. His student-friendly writing style and clear explanations acquaint students with our own solar system before moving on to the stars and distant galaxies. New Comparative Planetology boxes and data table throughout the text examine the similarities and differences in the geology, evolution, and atmospheres of all the planets in our solar system. This rich pedagogy further engages students and motivates them to think critically and develop basic reasoning skills in their studies.New and Key Features of the Seventh Edition:-Updated throughout with the latest discoveries in the field, with new and expanded content found in each chapter.-Added critical thinking and problem solving exercises can be found at the end of each chapter.-New boxes and data tables throughout examine the similarities and differences in the geology, evolution, and atmospheres of all planets in our solar system.-To increase understanding and clarity, sample calculations have been added to mathematical sections-Instructor's materials include PowerPoint Lecture Slides, PowerPoint Image Bank, Test Bank, Instructor's Manual, animations, and more.-The companion Web site, Starlinks, is included with every new copy of the text and includes study quizzes, Exploration Web links, animated flashcards, an online glossary, chapter outlines, a calendar of upcoming astronomical events, a guide to the constellations, and a new math review/tutor.

Literature 1989 Part 1

112.106 Masslosing peculiar red giants: the comparison between theory and observations. M. Jura. IAU Colloquium No. 106: Evolution of peculiar red giant stars, p. 339–347 (1989). – See Abstr. 012.047 for the main entry. The mass loss ...

Literature 1989  Part 1

From the reviews: "Astronomy and Astrophysics Abstracts has appeared in semi-annual volumes since 1969 and it has already become one of the fundemental publications in the fields of astronomy, astrophysics and neighbouring sciences. It is the most important English-language abstracting journal in the mentioned branches. ...The abstracts are classified under more than a hundred subject categories, thus permitting a quick survey of the whole extended material. The AAA is a valuable and important publication for all students and scientists working in the fields of astronomy and related sciences. As such it represents a necessary ingredient of any astronomical library all over the world." Space Science Review# "Dividing the whole field plus related subjects into 108 categories, each work is numbered and most are accompanied by brief abstracts. Fairly comprehensive cross-referencing links relevant papers to more than one category, and exhaustive author and subject indices are to be found at the back, making the catalogues easy to use. The series appears to be so complete in its coverage and always less than a year out of date that I shall certainly have to make a little more space on those shelves for future volumes." The Observatory Magazine#

Introduction to Stellar Winds

Table 2.3 Mass loss determinations of red supergiants in binary systems Star Type M. R. log L. M Voo Ve Voo / Ve 22 Vul G3 II - Ib 4.3 40 2.99 6 × 10-9 160 202 0.78 31 Cyg K4 Ib 6.2 202 3.91 4 x 10- 80 108 0.74 Aur K4 Ib 8.3 140 3.41 6 ...

Introduction to Stellar Winds

The first comprehensive introduction to the observations and theories of stellar winds; a long-awaited graduate textbook, written by two founders of the field.

In Quest of the Stars and Galaxies

The solar wind carries away about 1014 of the Sun's mass each year. This is an extremely small amount, for at this rate, the Sun will lose only 0.01% of its mass in 10 billion years. Mass loss is much more important for red giants.

In Quest of the Stars and Galaxies

Available with WebAssign! Author Theo Koupelis has set the mark for a student-friendly, accessible introductory astronomy text with In Quest of the Universe. He has now developed a new text to accommodate those course that focus mainly on stars and galaxies. Ideal for the one-term course, In Quest of the Stars and Galaxies opens with material essential to the introductory course (gravity, light, telescopes, the sun) and then moves on to focus on key material related to stars and galaxies. Incorporating the rich pedagogy and vibrant art program that have made his earlier books a success, Koupelis' In Quest of the Stars and Galaxies is the clear choice for students' first exploration of the cosmos.

Infrared Astronomy

... μm light from quiescent E galaxies is due to circumstellar shells associated with mass loss from red - giant stars . ... It is germane that Frogel & Whitford ( 1987 ) point out in their study of red giants in the Galactic bulge that ...

Infrared Astronomy

An excellent introduction and thorough review of developments in this wide-ranging field of research.

Interstellar Processes

The two main sources of new interstellar matter are mass-loss from stars and infall of extragalactic material. The rate of infall of material into the Milky Way ... important source of interstellar matter is mass loss from red giants.

Interstellar Processes

The idea for an international symposium on the interstellar medium was first discussed at the University of Wyoming during the summer of 1984. It was obvious that the outstanding natural beauty of the Teton mountain range in northwestern Wyoming must be matched by a meeting with the broadest appeal to the astronomical community. If the meeting was to produce a book, it must likewise be an important contribution to the astronomical literature. It was for these reasons that early in the discussions, it was decided that the University should host a "school". with the invited speakers presenting tutorials on a broad range of topics involving the interstellar medium. The symposium proceedings would then be a compilation of the written versions of these presentations. It has been nearly a decade since Lyman Spitzer published his classic text on the interstellar medium and we felt the need for a school and book that would focus on the recent developments in our understanding of the inter stellar medium. Thus, we view this two-volume set as an adjunct text to Spitzer's book.

Star Clusters IAU S266

The mass - loss rate along the first - ascent red - giant branch alone determines the upper red - giant - branch luminosity function and horizontal - branch morphology . The distribution of stars in these phases directly affects our ...

Star Clusters  IAU S266

IAU S266 consolidates the expertise of leading researchers to examine how star clusters can be used as key diagnostic tools within a wide range of disciplines in astrophysics. This volume provides a comprehensive presentation of the cutting-edge developments in theory, observations and simulations of star clusters and star cluster systems.

From the sun s energy source to the formation of the solar system

The total mass ejected by the red giant sun during this period is the multiplication of the length of time and the mass loss rate. 20∙106∙10-9∙ 1.98∙1030 = 3.96∙1028 kg We know that most of this mass loss is lost into the ...

From the sun s energy source to the formation of the solar system

The latest observation of hundreds of exoplanets and the discovery of supermassive black hole at the center of many galaxies set the foundation for the theory presented in this book. The theory suggest that the sun and stars energy source is not from fusion, but instead from magnetic fields spreads in the galaxy by the supermassive black hole at the center of every galaxy. This idea changes every aspect of astronomy and cosmology. The big bang is no longer necessary to explain the source of the mass in the universe and the expansion of the universe. According to this theory the matter in the universe is created in the cores of stars by conversion of energy to mass. The expansion of the universe is induced by the rapid formation of new galaxies. Stars grow slowly and gradually over tens of billion of years by conversion of energy to mass. The gradual growth of stars and the planet search programs that found hundreds of nearby planets indicate that stars are born from planets. This invalidates the solar nebula hypothesis as the source of the stars and the solar system. Stars fluctuate from a main sequence state to a red giant state. They stay in the main sequence when they receive strong magnetic fields and they turn into a red giant when the magnetic fields are weakened. The sun also fluctuated from a main sequence to a red giant. When the sun was a red giant it had strong solar wind that supplied the material to created the planets. The solar system contains hard evidence that the sun was a red giant, those are short lived isotopes and chondrules. The fact that there is hard evidenced to a red giant sun confirm this theory. Highlights of this theory include the following: 1. The sun energy source is from magnetic fields from the galactic center. 2. The heat induced by the magnetic fields leads to high energy collision between particle in the sun core that creates new particle and increase the sun mass. 3. All the stars in the galaxy create new mass so the total mass and the size of the galaxy is increasing. 4. The stars in the galaxy eject dust that freefall to the galactic center supermassive black hole. Thorough the dynamo effect the gravitational potential energy of the debris and dust is converted to magnetic fields. 5. As the galaxy mass and size increase, globular clusters are detached form the main galaxy to create new galaxies. 6. Galaxies spawn new galaxies and the total number of galaxies in the universe increase. 7. The universe expands and accelerates from the increase in the number of the galaxies. 8. The Big Bang cosmological model is replaced by a new cosmological model that resembles the steady state theory. 9. Stars grow gradually from conversion of energy to mass. 10.Stars are born from planets, they first grow by accretion and then by conversion of energy to mass. 11.Stars fluctuate from main sequence to a red giant. When the magnetic fields are strong the star is in the main sequence, when the magnetic fields are weakened the star turn to a red giant. 12.The sun was a red giant 4.6 billions years ago. 13.The planets were created from the strong solar wind of the red giant sun.