Maxims and Reflections

In the complete collection they are over a thousand in number, and not more perhaps than a hundred and fifty have already found their way into our language, whether as contributions to magazines here and in America, or in volumes of ...

Maxims and Reflections

The translation of Goethe's "Prose Maxims" now offered to the public is the first attempt that has yet been made to present the greater part of these incomparable sayings in English. In the complete collection they are over a thousand in number, and not more perhaps than a hundred and fifty have already found their way into our language, whether as contributions to magazines here and in America, or in volumes of miscellaneous extract from Goethe's writings. Some are at times quoted as though they were common literary property. To say that they are important as a whole would be a feeble tribute to a work eloquent for itself, and beyond the need of praise; but so deep is the wisdom of these maxims, so wide their reach, so compact a product are they of Goethe's wonderful genius, that it is something of a reproach to literature to find the most of them left untranslated for the sixty years they have been before the world. From one point of view, the neglect they have suffered is in no way surprising: they are too high and severe to be popular so soon; and when they meet with a wide acceptance as with other great works, much of it will rest upon authority. But even for the deeper side of his writings, Goethe has not been denied a fair measure of popular success. No other author of the last two centuries holds so high a place, or, as an inevitable consequence, has been attacked by so large an army of editors and commentators; and it might well be supposed by now that no corner of his work, and least of all one of the best, had remained almost unnoticed, and to the majority unknown. Many of these maxims were early translated into French, but with little success; and even in Germany it was only so late as the year 1870 that they appeared in a separate form, with the addition of some sort of critical comment and a brief explanation of their origin and history.

Maxims and Reflections

With freshness and immediacy, Maxims and Reflections vividly conjures up Goethe the man and the genius.

Maxims and Reflections


Maxims and Reflections Ricordi

Review: "Unlike Machiavelli-inveterate dreamer and cynic-Guicciardini's mind is remarkable for the balance and masterly coolness of its judgment.

Maxims and Reflections  Ricordi

Review: "Unlike Machiavelli-inveterate dreamer and cynic-Guicciardini's mind is remarkable for the balance and masterly coolness of its judgment."-Federico Chabod "In the history of Renaissance thought, Guicciardini's Ricordi occupy a place of singular importance. Few works of the sixteenth century allow us so penetrating an insight into the views and sentiments of its author as these reflections of the great Italian historian. . . . Like Machiavelli's Prince, the Ricordi form one of the outstanding documents of a time of crisis and transition; but unlike the Prince, they range over a wide field of private as well as public life. In doing so, they revel the man as well as the political theorist."-Nicolai Rubenstein, from the Introduction.

Collected Maxims and Other Reflections

This is the fullest collection of La Rochefoucauld's writings ever published in English, and includes the first complete translation of the Miscellaneous Reflections.

Collected Maxims and Other Reflections

This is the fullest collection of La Rochefoucauld's writings ever published in English, and includes the first complete translation of the Miscellaneous Reflections. A table of alternative maxim numbers and an index of topics help the reader to locate any maxim quickly.

Maxims Reflections c

Maxims  Reflections   c


The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe

In the complete collection they are over a thousand in number, and not more perhaps than a hundred and fifty have already found their way into our language, whether as contributions to magazines here and in America, or in volumes of ...

The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe

The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. Prose Maxims – New Complete Edition. Translated By Bailey Saunders. Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. Only mankind can do the impossible: He can distinguish, He chooses and judges, He can give permanence To the moment. The translation of Goethe's "Prose Maxims" now offered to the public is the first attempt that has yet been made to present the greater part of these incomparable sayings in English. In the complete collection they are over a thousand in number, and not more perhaps than a hundred and fifty have already found their way into our language, whether as contributions to magazines here and in America, or in volumes of miscellaneous extract from Goethe's writings. Some are at times quoted as though they were common literary property. To say that they are important as a whole would be a feeble tribute to a work eloquent for itself, and beyond the need of praise; but so deep is the wisdom of these maxims, so wide their reach, so compact a product are they of Goethe's wonderful genius, that it is something of a reproach to literature to find the most of them left untranslated for the sixty years they have been before the world. From one point of view, the neglect they have suffered is in no way surprising: they are too high and severe to be popular so soon; and when they meet with a wide acceptance as with other great works, much of it will rest upon authority. But even for the deeper side of his writings, Goethe has not been denied a fair measure of popular success. No other author of the last two centuries holds so high a place, or, as an inevitable consequence, has been attacked by so large an army of editors and commentators; and it might well be supposed by now that no corner of his work, and least of all one of the best, had remained almost unnoticed, and to the majority unknown. Many of these maxims were early translated into French, but with little success; and even in Germany it was only so late as the year 1870 that they appeared in a separate form, with the addition of some sort of critical comment and a brief explanation of their origin and history.

The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe

Thank you for checking out this book by Theophania Publishing.

The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe

The translation of Goethe's "Prose Maxims" now offered to the public is the first attempt that has yet been made to present the greater part of these incomparable sayings in English. In the complete collection they are over a thousand in number, and not more perhaps than a hundred and fifty have already found their way into our language, whether as contributions to magazines here and in America, or in volumes of miscellaneous extract from Goethe's writings. Some are at times quoted as though they were common literary property. To say that they are important as a whole would be a feeble tribute to a work eloquent for itself, and beyond the need of praise; but so deep is the wisdom of these maxims, so wide their reach, so compact a product are they of Goethe's wonderful genius, that it is something of a reproach to literature to find the most of them left untranslated for the sixty years they have been before the world. From one point of view, the neglect they have suffered is in no way surprising: they are too high and severe to be popular so soon; and when they meet with a wide acceptance as with other great works, much of it will rest upon authority. But even for the deeper side of his writings, Goethe has not been denied a fair measure of popular success. No other author of the last two centuries holds so high a place, or, as an inevitable consequence, has been attacked by so large an army of editors and commentators; and it might well be supposed by now that no corner of his work, and least of all one of the best, had remained almost unnoticed, and to the majority unknown. Many of these maxims were early translated into French, but with little success; and even in Germany it was only so late as the year 1870 that they appeared in a separate form, with the addition of some sort of critical comment and a brief explanation of their origin and history.

Economy of Truth

Readers who come to this book expecting practical guidance will not be disappointed, but they will be delighted to see that such guidance is being delivered rather artistically―via short stories that read like modern poetry, beautifully ...

Economy of Truth

“Highly readable and thought-provoking...A very pleasant and creative work.” ―Larry Sanger, ex-founder of Wikipedia Economy of Truth is a collection of practical maxims and reflections either designed through clever artwork or in the form of writing only. In an enjoyable and impactful manner, Vizi Andrei aims to challenge our long-held beliefs about art, education, courage, progress, happiness, intelligence, and creativity. Readers who come to this book expecting practical guidance will not be disappointed, but they will be delighted to see that such guidance is being delivered rather artistically―via short stories that read like modern poetry, beautifully accompanied by vivid illustrations. The wisdom this book permeates with comes from figures such as Seneca, Marcus Aurelius, Epictetus, Confucius, Epicurus, Antisthenes, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Michel de Montaigne, Emil Cioran, Leo Tolstoy, Mircea Eliade, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Gilbert Keith Chesterton, Friedrich Nietzsche, Blaise Pascal, Arthur Schopenhauer, Luc de Clapiers but also Carlo M. Cipolla, Umberto Eco, Nassim Nicholas Taleb, Alain de Botton, Rory Sutherland, or Naval Ravikant. “An urgent book...Vizi’s work is bursting with many irreverent lessons ready to help you remove the chains of modernity. This book will sharpen your thinking and help you gain clarity on a variety of crucial topics.” ―Ruben Chavez, founder of ThinkGrowProsper “A well-reasoned collection of meditations...They will all contagiously make you think!” ―Luca Dellanna, author of Operational Excellence “Written in a quaint voice, this book charms the reader―mixing just the right amount of reflective self-awareness with cutting insight. For those who consider musings of great import, a pleasant stroll through Economy of Truth would be time well-spent.” ―Jack Peach, teacher and traveler

Maxims and Reflections

Maxims and Reflections


Maxims and Reflections

Geothe's fourteen hundred Maxims and Reflections reveal some of his deepest thought on art, ethics, literature and natural science, but also his immediate reactions to books, chance encounters or his administrative work.

Maxims and Reflections

Geothe's fourteen hundred Maxims and Reflections reveal some of his deepest thought on art, ethics, literature and natural science, but also his immediate reactions to books, chance encounters or his administrative work. Although variable in quality, the vast majority have a freshness and immediacy which vividly conjure up Goethe the man. They make an ideal introduction to one of the greatest of European writers.

The Maxims and Reflections

The Maxims and Reflections

The Maxims and Reflections

The Maxims and Reflections

Renaissance Philosophy

This collection of three philosophical works by Renaissance men offers timeless advice on how to prosper and live morally in business, romance, religion, and society.

Renaissance Philosophy

Wisdom for today’s world from three great thinkers of the Renaissance era. This collection of three philosophical works by Renaissance men offers timeless advice on how to prosper and live morally in business, romance, religion, and society. Although written in the Renaissance era, these guides still resonate today and are collected here for easy reference. In The Art of Worldly Wisdom, Baltasar Gracián advises people of all walks of life how to approach political, professional, and personal situations in a dog-eat-dog world. Comprised of three hundred pithy aphorisms, this influential work of philosophy offers thought-provoking and accessible advice. Some subjects include “Never Compete,” “The Art of Letting Things Alone,” and “Anticipate Injuries and Turn Them into Favours.” Reflections; or Sentences and Moral Maxims by François de La Rochefoucauld offers hundreds of brief, brutally honest observations of humankind and its self-serving nature. The perfect read for any realist—or anyone with the desire to evaluate their moral standing—this edition includes three supplements with additional maxims and essays. In Maxims and Reflections, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe takes a detour from his usual literary endeavors and offers snippets of his musings on life, literature, science, nature, politics, and the human condition. Essential for fans of Goethe’s works, it provides unique insight into the mind of the last true Renaissance man. This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.

Maxims and Reflections

Geothe's fourteen hundred Maxims and Reflections reveal some of his deepest thought on art, ethics, literature and natural science, but also his immediate reactions to books, chance encounters or his administrative work.

Maxims and Reflections

Geothe's fourteen hundred Maxims and Reflections reveal some of his deepest thought on art, ethics, literature and natural science, but also his immediate reactions to books, chance encounters or his administrative work. Although variable in quality, the vast majority have a freshness and immediacy which vividly conjure up Goethe the man. They make an ideal introduction to one of the greatest of European writers.There is nothing worth thinking but it has been thought before; we must only try to think it again.2How can a man come to know himself? Never by thinking, but by doing. Try to do your duty, and you will know at once what you are worth.3But what is your duty? The claims of the day.4The world of reason is to be regarded as a great and immortal being, who ceaselessly works out what is necessary, and so makes himself lord also over what is accidental.5The longer I live, the more it grieves me to see man, who occupies his supreme place for the very purpose of imposing his will upon nature, and freeing himself and his from an outrageous necessity, -to see him taken up with some false notion, and doing just the opposite of what he wants to do; and then, because the whole bent of his mind is spoilt, bungling miserably over everything

Maxims and Reflections

This is a new release of the original 1949 edition.

Maxims and Reflections

This is a new release of the original 1949 edition.

Reflections

This famed work by a noted French author of the Renaissance era, seventeenth-century nobleman François de La Rochefoucauld, offers hundreds of brief, brutally honest observations of humankind and its self-serving nature.

Reflections

We all have strength enough to endure the misfortunes of others. This famed work by a noted French author of the Renaissance era, seventeenth-century nobleman François de La Rochefoucauld, offers hundreds of brief, brutally honest observations of humankind and its self-serving nature. The perfect read for any realist—or anyone with the desire to evaluate their moral standing—this edition includes three supplements with additional maxims and essays. This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.