Maximum Rocknroll

MAXIMUMROCKNROLL TOP 10 I For what it ' s worth not much ) , here ' s some
of the MAR crew ' s current Top 10 ( or so . . . ) lists of stuft we reviewed this month
. SUBSCRIPTIONS : ( postpaid prices ) •US Rate : S4 each . 6 issue sub for ...

Maximum Rocknroll


The Ballerina and the Bull

Maximum Rocknroll was passionately committed to the ethos of autonomy and
would only carry ads and review records from independent labels. This was
important, because Maximum Rocknroll was a central source of information
about ...

The Ballerina and the Bull

Our moment has seen the resurgence of an anarchist sensibility, from the uprisings in Seattle in 1999 to the Occupy movement of 2011. Against the vacuity and drift of financialized capitalism, proclaiming there is no alternative, these insurgent movements have insisted that an alternative is possible. In The Ballerina and the Bull Johanna Isaacson explores the occult history of US punk, hardcore, queercore, and riot grrrl, DIY culture, and alternative subcultures to trace a new politics of expressive negation that both contests the present order and gives us a sense of the impasses of politics in an age of depoliticization. Expressive negation registers the contradictory politics at the heart of these projects: the desire for negation that must be positively expressed. Drawing on first- hand experience, interviews, and discussion of the ludic, spatial, and sexual politics of anarchist subcultures, Isaacson maps an underground utopian politics of style and develops a radically new history of the present moment.

Punk Record Labels and the Struggle for Autonomy

20, September—October 1997, 49—53. MRR. “Ax/ction Records.”
Maximumrocknroll no. 46, March 1987, 1 page. MRR. Documents relating to
Screeching Weasel and Lookout Records. Maximum, rocknroll no. 168, May
1997, 5 pages. MRR.

Punk Record Labels and the Struggle for Autonomy

This book describes the emergence of DIY punk record labels in the early 1980s. Based on interviews with sixty-one labels, including four in Spain and four in Canada, it describes the social background of those who run these labels. Especially interesting are those operated by dropouts from the middle class. Other respected older labels are often run by people with upper middle-class backgrounds. A third group of labels are operated by working-class and lower middle-class punks who take a serious attitude to the work. Using the ideas of French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu, this book shows how the field of record labels operates. The choice of independent or corporate distribution is a major dilemma. Other tensions are about signing contracts with bands, expecting extensive touring, and using professional promotion. There are often rivalries between big and small labels over bands that have become popular and have to decide whether to move to a more commercial record label. Unlike approaches to punk that consider it as subcultural style, this book breaks new ground by describing punk as a social activity. One of the surprising findings is how many parents actually support their children's participation in the scene. Rather than attempting to define punk as resistance or as commercial culture, this book shows the dilemmas that actual punks struggle with as they attempt to live up to what the scene means for them.

We Were Going to Change the World

Worked in L.A. as a photographer and writer for fanzines (including Flipside,
Maximum Rocknroll, and We Got Power) and as a columnist for Maximum
Rocknroll, and attended shows at various venues throughout Los Angeles
County in the ...

We Were Going to Change the World

The punk rock scene of the 1970s and ’80s in Southern California is widely acknowledged as one of the most vibrant, creative periods in all of rock and roll history. And while many books have covered the artists who contributed to the music of that era, none have exclusively focused on the vitality and influence of the women who played such a crucial role in this incredibly dynamic and instrumental movement. We Were Going to Change the World captures the stories of women who were active in the SoCal punk rock scene during this historic time, adding an important voice to its cultural and musical record. Through exclusive interviews with musicians, journalists, photographers, and fans, Stacy Russo has captured the essence of why these women were drawn to punk rock, what they witnessed, and how their involvement in this empowering scene ended up influencing the rest of their lives. From such hugely influential musicians and performers as Exene Cervenka, Alice Bag, Kira, Phranc, Johanna Went, Teresa Covarrubias, and Jennifer Precious Finch, to such highly regarded journalists, DJs, and photographers as Ann Summa, Jenny Lens, Kristine McKenna, Pleasant Gehman, and Stella, to the fans and scenesters who supported the bands and added so much color and energy to the scene, We Were Going to Change the World is an important oral history of the crucial contributions women injected into the Southern California punk rock scene of the 1970s and ’80s. Empowering, touching, and informative, Stacy Russo’s collection of interviews adds a whole new dimension to the literature of both punk rock and women’s studies.

The Politics of Punk

Maximum Rocknroll 60 (May 1988). Grisham, Jack. Interview with the author.
June 2012. Gross ... “The Politics of Youth Culture: Some Observations on Rock
and Roll in American Culture.” Social Text 8 (Winter 1983–1984): 104–26. ———
.

The Politics of Punk

The Politics of Punk probes the conscience of punk music by going beyond the lyrics and slogans of the pithy culture war. Creating a people’s history of punk's social, aesthetic, and political features, the book features original interviews with members of Dead Kennedys, Dead Boys, MDC, and many more.

AC DC Maximum Rock Roll

Now, in a book of astonishing breadth and scope, comes, for the very first time, the complete story of AC/DC.

AC DC  Maximum Rock   Roll

Over three decades and more than 150 million albums, AC/DC has established itself as much more than just a great rock band. For millions of fans spanning several generations across the world, they are an ear-bleedingly loud, sweat-soaked religion, courtesy of such classic albums as Highway to Hell and Back in Black. Now, in a book of astonishing breadth and scope, comes, for the very first time, the complete story of AC/DC. Everything you ever wanted to know and plenty more you never dreamt of is all here, the ultimate balls-out adventure, laced with sex, drunken escapades and brawls. It's a journey that started in the suburban Sydney, Australia, bedrooms of brothers Malcolm and Angus Young, boys who could wreak havoc with their guitars. Over their power chords were the lyrics and voice of Bon Scott, who would lead them higher and higher—until his tragic death in 1980. The bittersweet irony after his death was that not only did the Youngs manage to hold together without him, but the band's fortunes and status skyrocketed with his replacement, Brian Johnson, and the album Back in Black. Five long years in the making, AC/DC: Maximum Rock & Roll is sourced from more than 1,300 interviews the band has given over the past thirty years combined with in excess of 75 of the authors' own interviews with those who worked with AC/DC both in the studio and on the road—many of whom have never spoken about the band publicly. It's topped off with stunning, never-before-seen photos to create the ultimate portrait of the ultimate rock band.

Maximum Rocknroll

Maximum Rocknroll


Rebel Music in the Triumphant Empire

Review of Bad Religion, No Control LP, MaximumRockNRoll 81 (February 1990).
35. Mike McNiel, Review of NOFX, The Longest Line EP, MaximumRockNRoll
109 (June 1992). 36. Michelle Haunold, Review of Pennywise, Wild Card EP ...

Rebel Music in the Triumphant Empire

At the dawn of the 1990s, as the United States celebrated its victory in the Cold War and sole superpower status by waging war on Iraq and proclaiming democratic capitalism as the best possible society, the 1990s underground punk renaissance transformed the punk scene into a site of radical opposition to American empire. Nazi skinheads were ejected from the punk scene; apathetic attitudes were challenged; women, Latino, and LGBTQ participants asserted their identities and perspectives within punk; the scene debated the virtues of maintaining DIY purity versus venturing into the musical mainstream; and punks participated in protest movements from animal rights to stopping the execution of Mumia Abu-Jamal to shutting down the 1999 WTO meeting. Punk lyrics offered strident critiques of American empire, from its exploitation of the Third World to its warped social relations. Numerous subgenres of punk proliferated to deliver this critique, such as the blazing hardcore punk of bands like Los Crudos, propagandistic crust-punk/dis-core, grindcore and power violence with tempos over 800 beats per minute, and So-Cal punk with its combination of melody and hardcore. Musical analysis of each of these styles and the expressive efficacy of numerous bands reveals that punk is not merely simplistic three-chord rock music, but a genre that is constantly revolutionizing itself in which nuances of guitar riffs, vocal timbres, drum beats, and song structures are deeply meaningful to its audience, as corroborated by the robust discourse in punk zines.

Grace Ambrose Maximum RocknRoll

Interview of Grace Ambrose, coordinator of the San Francisco-based punk zine, Maximum RocknRoll, by Marc Fischer.

Grace Ambrose   Maximum RocknRoll

Interview of Grace Ambrose, coordinator of the San Francisco-based punk magazine, Maximum RocknRoll, by Marc Fischer.

Fear of a Norb Planet

A complete collection of Rev. Norb's ridiculous punk columns for Maximum RockNRoll magazine, from 1994-98.

Fear of a Norb Planet

A complete collection of Rev. Norb's ridiculous punk columns for Maximum RockNRoll magazine, from 1994-98.

Maximum Rocknroll Zine Features 1987 present

Compilation of selected zine-related features published in Maximum Rocknroll dating between 1987 and 2014. Includes profiles of and interviews with zine creators from around the world.

Maximum Rocknroll Zine Features  1987 present

Compilation of selected zine-related features published in Maximum Rocknroll dating between 1987 and 2014. Includes profiles of and interviews with zine creators from around the world.

AC DC

For the first time, Murray Engleheart along with Arnaud Durieux tells the full story of Australia's greatest and loudest rock n' rock export. Not only did they manage to emerge from the tragic death of legendary singer, Bon Scott in 1980.

AC DC

Who knew when the Young family emigrated from Glasgow to Sydney in the early sixties that the family's youngest lads would go on to lead one of the world's most loved and respected rock bands? Who knew that some of their biggest fans would end up being their own heroes, the Rolling Stones? that streets in Melbourne and Madrid would be officially named in their honour? that they would play to two million people at a single concert in Moscow? For the first time, Murray Engleheart along with Arnaud Durieux tells the full story of Australia's greatest and loudest rock n' rock export. Not only did they manage to emerge from the tragic death of legendary singer, Bon Scott in 1980. But in a bitter sweet irony, the band's fortunes and status skyrocketed around the world with Scott's replacement, Brian Johnson and the album, Back In Black. More than 25 years on, AC/DC show no sign of slowing down and are more an institution than simply a rock band. try and imagine a world without them.

AC DC

More than five years in the making, Maximum Rock 'n' Roll is the most in-depth view yet of the AC/DC phenomenon, forged by the world's foremost and internationally recognised experts on the band.

AC DC

Who knew that when the Young family emigrated from Glasgow to Sydney in the early sixties, that the family's youngest lads would go on to lead on of the world's most loved and respected rock bands? For the first time, the authors' tell the full story of Australia's greatest and loudest rock'n'roll export - AC/DC.

Punk Crisis

As author Raymond A. Patton argues, punk eroded the boundaries and political categories that defined the Cold War Era, replacing them with a new framework based on identity as conservative or progressive.

Punk Crisis

In March 1977, John "Johnny Rotten" Lydon of the punk band the Sex Pistols looked over the Berlin wall onto the grey, militarized landscape of East Berlin, which reminded him of home in London. Lydon went up to the wall and extended his middle finger. He didn't know it at the time, but the Sex Pistols' reputation had preceded his gesture, as young people in the "Second World" busily appropriated news reports on degenerate Western culture as punk instruction manuals. Soon after, burgeoning Polish punk impresario Henryk Gajewski brought the London punk band the Raincoats to perform at his art gallery and student club-the epicenter for Warsaw's nascent punk scene. When the Raincoats returned to England, they found London erupting at the Rock Against Racism concert, which brought together 100,000 "First World" UK punks and "Third World" Caribbean immigrants who contributed their cultures of reggae and Rastafarianism. Punk had formed networks reaching across all three of the Cold War's "worlds". The first global narrative of punk, Punk Crisis examines how transnational punk movements challenged the global order of the Cold War, blurring the boundaries between East and West, North and South, communism and capitalism through performances of creative dissent. As author Raymond A. Patton argues, punk eroded the boundaries and political categories that defined the Cold War Era, replacing them with a new framework based on identity as conservative or progressive. Through this paradigm shift, punk unwittingly ushered in a new era of global neoliberalism.

Maximum Rock n Roll

Maximum Rock  n Roll


Punk and Revolution

In these seven essays, Greene experiments with style and content, bends the ethnographic genre, and juxtaposes the textual and visual.

Punk and Revolution

In Punk and Revolution Shane Greene radically uproots punk from its iconic place in First World urban culture, Anglo popular music, and the Euro-American avant-garde, situating it instead as a crucial element in Peru's culture of subversive militancy and political violence. Inspired by José Carlos Mariátegui's Seven Interpretive Essays on Peruvian Reality, Greene explores punk's political aspirations and subcultural possibilities while complicating the dominant narratives of the war between the Shining Path and the Peruvian state. In these seven essays, Greene experiments with style and content, bends the ethnographic genre, and juxtaposes the textual and visual. He theorizes punk in Lima as a mode of aesthetic and material underproduction, rants at canonical cultural studies for its failure to acknowledge punk's potential for generating revolutionary politics, and uncovers the intersections of gender, ethnicity, class, and authenticity in the Lima punk scene. Following the theoretical interventions of Debord, Benjamin, and Bakhtin, Greene fundamentally redefines how we might think about the creative contours of punk subculture and the politics of anarchist praxis.

Processing Creativity

If you’ve had trouble getting your music to be as good as the musicians you look up to, then this book can help you understand the practices they use to make their music so great.

Processing Creativity

p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; text-indent: 48.0px; line-height: 18.0px; font: 13.0px Arial; -webkit-text-stroke: #000000} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; text-indent: 48.0px; line-height: 18.0px; font: 12.0px Times; -webkit-text-stroke: #000000; min-height: 14.0px} p.p3 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; line-height: 14.0px; font: 12.0px Times; -webkit-text-stroke: #000000; min-height: 14.0px} li.li4 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; line-height: 18.0px; font: 13.0px Arial; -webkit-text-stroke: #000000} li.li5 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; line-height: 18.0px; font: 13.0px Arial; -webkit-text-stroke: #000000; min-height: 15.0px} span.s1 {font-kerning: none} ul.ul1 {list-style-type: disc} For over a decade, Jesse Cannon has been pushing creative ideas in music. You may know him from writing one of the most popular books on the music business, Get More Fans, or from his recording credits on records with the most varied set of bands you’ve ever seen including: The Cure, The Misfits, Animal Collective, Brand New, The Dillinger Escape Plan, The Menzingers, Limp Bizkit, Basement, Leftover Crack, Saves The Day, Senses Fail, Weird Al, Lifetime, Say Anything, NOFX, Man Overboard, Bad Books, Transit, Somos, Conflict and over a thousand others. You may also know his work as the host of the podcast Noise Creators and Off The Record or from writing for outlets like Alternative Press, Tape Op, Hypebot and countless others. He just wrote a book about what he’s learned working on all those records and writing about music’s bleeding edge, taking on the subject he knows the most about; helping musicians fulfill their creative vision. Processing Creativity: The Tools, Practices And Habits Used To Make Music You’re Happy With is the culmination of four years of poring over scientific studies, books and thoughts from top creators as well as his own experience to write a book every musician should read about what goes into making great music versus what bands do when they make a bad album. Covering the pitfalls of creating music, the book thoroughly explores the hidden reasons we actually like music, how to get along with your collaborators and patterns that help creativity flourish. While every musician says that being creative is the most important part of their life, they barely explore what’s holding back them back from making music they are happy with. When trying to navigate the ways our creative endeavors fail there’s no YouTube tutorial, listicle or college course that can help navigate the countless creative pitfalls that can ruin your music. If you’ve had trouble getting your music to be as good as the musicians you look up to, then this book can help you understand the practices they use to make their music so great. He’s crafted a book that exposes life-changing knowledge that can be read in under a day, that identifies the patterns and essential knowledge he helps bring to musicians each day. Writing a detailed read that will leave even the most advanced creators with a new perspective on how to make music they’re more happy with. There are no rules to being creative, but there's research and considerations that can help you make better decisions, get past the breakdowns in your process and enhance the emotional impact your songs have on others. The essential ideas on creating music are detailed in a simple, fun language that’s littered with quotes and insight from the most innovative creators of our time that discusses subjects like: How to make highly emotional music that makes listeners compelled to listen again and again. Effectively dealing with collaborative problems like “too many chefs in the kitchen,” giving helpful criticism or dealing with stubborn collaborators. Finding inspiration to develop into music that’s uniquely your own. How to draft your songs while avoiding the common pitfalls of losing perspective and giving up. Examining the unexpected reasons we enjoy music. Calming your thoughts so they don’t sabotage your music and other helpful tools to help execute your music as best as possible. Whether you're a music fan, producer, songwriter or musician, there's no book with more helpful ideas that can help make everything you create in the future better.

MDC Memoir from a Damaged Civilization

From the time Dave Dictor was young, he knew he was a little different than the all-American kids around him.

MDC  Memoir from a Damaged Civilization

A searing punk memoir by an American original rebelling against conformity, complacency, and conservatism with his iconic band, MDC. From the time Dave Dictor was young, he knew he was a little different than the all-American kids around him. Radicalized politically while in high school, inspired to seize opportunities by his hard-working parents, and intrigued with gender fluidity, Dictor moved to Austin, and connected with local misfits and anti-establishment rock'n'rollers. He began penning songs that influenced American punk rock for decades. MDC always has been in the vanguard of social struggles, confronting homophobia in punk rock during the early 1980s; invading America's heartland at sweltering Rock Against Reagan shows; protesting the Pope's visit to San Francisco in 1987; in 1993 they were the first touring US punk band to reach a volatile Russia after the collapse of the Soviet Union. Dictor's narrative is a raw portrait of an American underground folk-hero who stood on the barricades advocating social justice and spreading punk's promise to a global audience. Part poet, renegade, satirist, and lover, he is an authentic, homegrown character carrying the progressive punk fight into the twenty-first century. Dave Dictor is singer, lyricist, and founding member of legendary American punk band MDC (Millions of Dead Cops). Since 1979, Dictor has toured throughout the world with MDC, releasing more than nine albums with MDC that sold more than 125,000 copies. MDC continues to tour, playing over sixty concerts each year. Dictor's MDC song, "John Wayne Was a Nazi," was featured in the best-selling video game Grand Theft Auto 5. He appeared in the film American Hardcore and resides in Portland, Oregon.

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