Mayan Visions

analysis of the Guatemalan pan-Mayan identity movement. ... I shall draw on her strategies to analyze the Zapatista movement of the Chiapas Mayans. ... I have tried to articulate the unself-conscious 234 MAYAN VISIONS.

Mayan Visions

A significant work by one of anthropology's most important scholars, this book provides an introduction to the Chiapas Mayan community of Mexico, better known for their role in the Zapatista Rebellion.

Ancient Maya Women

While most of her work has focused on chicken Itzá , she is now the project epigrapher for research at the Maya site of ... years was published in 2001 with the title Mayan Visions : The Quest for Autonomy in an Age of Globalization .

Ancient Maya Women

Edited volume tracing the state of knowledge of gender in Ancient Mayan society. Visit our website for sample chapters!

Socio Environmental Regimes and Local Visions

The Mayan institutions not only contrast with but are in competition with the basic education system established from the structure of the Mexican State. The competition is given in terms of educational content (i.e., knowledge of the ...

Socio Environmental Regimes and Local Visions

This book presents oral histories, collective dialogues, and analyses of rural and indigenous livelihoods facing global socio-environmental regime change in Latin America (LA). Since the late twentieth century, rural and indigenous producers in LA, including agriculturists, coffee-growers, as well as small-scale farmers/fishers, and others, have had to resist, cope with, or adapt to a range of neoliberal socio-environmental regimes that impact their territories and associated resources, including water, production systems and ultimately their cultural traditions. In response, rural producers are using local visions and innovation niches to decide what, when, and how to resist, cope with uncertainty, and still be successful in using their customary laws to retain their land rights and livelihoods. This book presents a range of ethnically diverse case studies from LA, which addresses socio-environmental, educational, and law regimes’ effects using transdisciplinary research approaches in rural, traditional and indigenous production systems. Based on both, the results and insights gained into how producers are resisting and adapting to these regimes, as well as decades of research carried out in LA rural territories by the participating authors, the book puts forward a baseline for devising new public policies that are better suited to the real challenges of livelihoods, poverty, and environmental degradation in LA. These recommendations are rooted in post-development thinking; they promote territorial public policy with social inclusion and a human’s rights approach. The book draws on over 20 years of research carried out by LA’s academics and their undergraduate and graduate students who have addressed collaborative work, participatory research, and transdisciplinary approaches with rural commons and communities in LA. It features 19 case studies, with contributions from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Cuba, Honduras, and Mexico.

Contemporary Theatre in Mayan Mexico

June C. Nash explores this in more detail in Mayan Visions : The Quest for Autonomy in an Age of Globalization ( New York : Routledge , 2001 ) . According to Nash , one of the most important differences between the logic of indigenous ...

Contemporary Theatre in Mayan Mexico

From the dramatization of local legends to the staging of plays by Shakespeare and other canonical playwrights to the exploration of contemporary sociopolitical problems and their effects on women and children, Mayan theatre is a flourishing cultural institution in southern Mexico. Part of a larger movement to define Mayan self-identity and reclaim a Mayan cultural heritage, theatre in Mayan languages has both reflected on and contributed to a growing awareness of Mayans as contemporary cultural and political players in Mexico and on the world's stage. In this book, Tamara Underiner draws on fieldwork with theatre groups in Chiapas, Tabasco, and Yucatán to observe the Maya peoples in the process of defining themselves through theatrical performance. She looks at the activities of four theatre groups or networks, focusing on their operating strategies and on close analyses of selected dramatic texts. She shows that while each group works under the rubric of Mayan or indigenous theatre, their works are also in constant dialogue, confrontation, and collaboration with the wider, non-Mayan world. Her observations thus reveal not only how theatre is an agent of cultural self-definition and community-building but also how theatre negotiates complex relations among indigenous communities in Mayan Mexico, state governments, and non-Mayan artists and researchers.

The Maya

Kay B. Warren, Indigenous Movements and their Critics: Pan-Maya Activism in Guatemala (Princeton, NJ, 1998), p. 82. ... 15 June C. Nash, Mayan Visions: The Quest for Autonomy in an Age of Globalization (New York, 2001), pp. 24–5, 122–3.

The Maya

An illuminating look at the myriad communities who have engaged with the ancient Maya over the centuries. This book reveals how the ancient Maya—and their buildings, ideas, objects, and identities—have been perceived, portrayed, and exploited over five hundred years in the Americas, Europe, and beyond. Engaging in interdisciplinary analysis, the book summarizes ancient Maya art and history from the preclassical period to the Spanish invasion, as well as the history of outside engagement with the ancient Maya, from Spanish invaders in the sixteenth century to later explorers and archaeologists, taking in scientific literature, visual arts, architecture, world’s fairs, and Indigenous activism. It also looks at the decipherment of Maya inscriptions, Maya museum exhibitions and artists’ responses, and contemporary Maya people’s engagements with their ancestral past. Featuring the latest research, this book will interest scholars as well as general readers who wish to know more about this ancient, fascinating culture.

Visions Abya Yala

When we speak of living development of the philosophy , things , the Mayan vision enco- mystical theology , artistry and mpasses minerals , vegetables , ani- science of the peoples . Instead of mals , water , stones , etc. recognising ...

Visions Abya Yala


Comparative Indigeneities of the Am ricas

We argue that the Yucatan Peninsula cannot be characterized by Mayan apathy and conformism — as a region where “nothing happens,” ... since neither is unified in terms of interests, perceived needs, desires, and visions of the future.

Comparative Indigeneities of the Am  ricas

Comparative Indigeneities of the Américas highlights intersecting themes such as indigenismo, mestizaje, migration, displacement, autonomy, sovereignty, borders, spirituality, and healing that have historically shaped the experiences of Native peoples across the Américas. In doing so, it promotes a broader understanding of the relationships between Native communities in the United States and Canada and those in Latin America and the Caribbean and invites a hemispheric understanding of the relationships between Native and mestiza/o peoples.

Theory in Social and Cultural Anthropology

Communities in Chiapas, Mexico (1995), which was simultaneously published in Spanish; Mayan Visions (2001), with a Spanish translation in 2006; and Social Movements: A Reader (2004). Nash shares homes with her husband, the religious ...

Theory in Social and Cultural Anthropology

Social and cultural anthropology and archaeology are rich subjects with deep connections in the social and physical sciences. Over the past 150 years, the subject matter and different theoretical perspectives have expanded so greatly that no single individual can command all of it. Consequently, both advanced students and professionals may be confronted with theoretical positions and names of theorists with whom they are only partially familiar, if they have heard of them at all. Students, in particular, are likely to turn to the web to find quick background information on theorists and theories. However, most web-based information is inaccurate and/or lacks depth. Students and professionals need a source to provide a quick overview of a particular theory and theorist with just the basics—the "who, what, where, how, and why," if you will. In response, SAGE Reference plans to publish the two-volume Theory in Social and Cultural Anthropology: An Encyclopedia. Features & Benefits: Two volumes containing approximately 335 signed entries provide users with the most authoritative and thorough reference resource available on anthropology theory, both in terms of breadth and depth of coverage. To ease navigation between and among related entries, a Reader's Guide groups entries thematically and each entry is followed by Cross-References. In the electronic version, the Reader's Guide combines with the Cross-References and a detailed Index to provide robust search-and-browse capabilities. An appendix with a Chronology of Anthropology Theory allows students to easily chart directions and trends in thought and theory from early times to the present. Suggestions for Further Reading at the end of each entry and a Master Bibliography at the end guide readers to sources for more detailed research and discussion.

The Legacy of Mesoamerica

NASH, JUNE C. 2001 Mayan Visions: The Quest for Autonomy in an Age of Globalization. London: Routledge. ROSS, JOHN 1994 Rebellion from the Roots: Indian Uprising in Chiapas. Munroe, Maine: Common Courage Press. ROSS, JOHN 1995 The EZLN, ...

The Legacy of Mesoamerica

The Legacy of Mesoamerica: History and Culture of a Native American Civilization summarizes and integrates information on the origins, historical development, and current situations of the indigenous peoples of Mesoamerica. It describes their contributions from the development of Mesoamerican Civilization through 20th century and their influence in the world community. For courses on Mesoamerica (Middle America) taught in departments of anthropology, history, and Latin American Studies.

13 B aktun

Mayan Visions of 2012 and Beyond Gaspar Pedro Gonzalez. C H A P T E R 4 ---- ... we can observe how some myths can be “translated” and converted into mathematical diagrams that express astronomical relationships and allow for the ...

13 B aktun

As 2012 looms with its promise of radical cultural and spiritual change, humankind is increasingly seeking strategies to survive and thrive. In 13 B’aktun, Gaspar Pedro González turns to the traditional Mayan belief system to navigate this uncertain future. The term 13 B’aktun refers to the thirteenth cycle of 144,000 days in the Mayan Long Count Calendar. Many scholars believe that this cycle is set to end on December 21, 2012. Framed as a fictional dialogue between a contemporary Mayan father and son, the book explores such questions as “Will life continue on Earth?” and “Will there be another creation at the end of this era?” The father imparts the knowledge of his ancestors and shares his direct mystical experiences that bring alive traditional beliefs about creation and the divine purpose of humanity, the Earth, and the universe. Through the father’s poetic words, the author helps us to critically reflect on our existence, the state of the modern world, and human destiny. In addition to ancient Mayan wisdom, 13 B’aktun incorporates the insights of modern philosophers, scientists, and religious texts concerning consciousness, human behavior, and predictions for the future. What unifies all of these sources is the message that despite our existing world dilemmas, there is still time to change our ways. The only book on 2012 by a Mayan author, 13 B’aktun draws on the storytelling experiences of the author’s childhood and his academic research as an adult. Countering the widespread hype and misinformation surrounding 2012, González blends past and present thought into a persuasive plan for moving into the new era.

Indigenous Movements Self Representation and the State in Latin America

Mayan Visions: The Quest for Autonomy in an Age of Globalization. New York: Routledge. Nelson, Diane. 1996. Maya Hackers and the Cyberspatialized Nation-State: Modernity, Ethnostalgia, and a Lizard Queen in Guatemala.

Indigenous Movements  Self Representation  and the State in Latin America

This volume focuses on movements, the politics of representation, and Latin America's anthropological and activist orientation.

Moon Belize Cayes

13 B'aktun: Mayan Visions of 2012 and Beyond. Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic Books, 2010. González is a Q'anjobal Mayan novelist, philosopher, and scholar from Guatemala. This book, translated to English by Dr. Robert Sitler, ...

Moon Belize Cayes

This full-color guide to Belize Cayes includes vibrant photos and helpful planning maps. Travel writer, photographer, and Belize expert Lebawit Lily Girma shares the best ways to experience these stunning islands. Girma offers a range of interesting activities for every traveler—whether they're avid snorkelers, beach bums, aspiring divers, honeymooners, or simply on a budget—as well as unique features like an underwater guide to exploring the sea life of Belize. Packed with information on dining, transportation, and accommodations, Moon Belize Cayes gives travelers the tools they need to create a more personal and memorable experience.

Adjusting the Lens

Her research interests include Mayan knowledge and culture, Mayan self-identity and representation, ... “Agua sagrada: Uno de los principales elementos de vida en la cultura Maya” (2013), “Mayan Visions of Autonomy and the Politics of ...

Adjusting the Lens

Adjusting the Lens offers a detailed analysis of contemporary, independent, indigenous-language audiovisual production in Mexico and in Mexican migrant communities in the United States. The contributors relate the styles and forms of collaborative and community media production to socially critical, transformative, resistant, and constitutive processes off-screen, thereby exploring the political within the context of the media. The chapters show how diasporic media makers map novel interpretations of image and sound into existing audiovisual discourses to communicate social and cultural changes within their communities that counter stereotypical representations in commercial television and cinema, and contribute to a newfound communal identity. The new media expose the conflict of social movements and/or indigenous and rural communities with the state, challenge Eurocentrism and globalization, and reveal the power of audiovisual production to affect political change.

Uprising of Hope

Like the ancient Maya ancestors for whom the sea was a dreamtime boundary between two creations , the Zapatista vision ... and June Nash's Mayan Visions ( 2001 ) is an exhaustive survey of the attempt to achieve indigenous autonomy .

Uprising of Hope

Drawing on decades-long relationships and fieldwork with the Zapatistas of south-eastern Mexico, cultural anthropologists Duncan Earle and Jeanne Simonelli reveal a complex portrait of a people struggling with self-determination on every level. Combining their own compelling narrative as participant-observers, and those of their Chaipas compadres, the authors effectively call for an activist approach to research, resulting in an ethnography that is at once analytical and deeply personal. Uprising of Hope is compelling reading for scholars and general readers of anthropology, social justice, ethnography, Latin American history and ethnic studies.

Weaving the Past

University of Texas Press, Austin. Nash, June. 2001. Mayan Visions:The Quest for Autonomy in an Age of Globalization. Routledge, New York. ———. 1995. The Reassertion of Indigenous Identity: Mayan Responses to State Intervention in ...

Weaving the Past

Weaving the Past is the first comprehensive history of Latin America's indigenous women. While concentrating mainly on native women in Mesoamerica and the Andes, it also covers indigenous peoples in a variety of areas of South and Central America. Drawing on primary and secondary sources, it argues that change, not continuity, has been the norm for indigenous peoples whose resilience in the face of complex and long-term patterns of cultural change is due in no small part to the roles, actions, and agency of women.

Dissident Women

Nash, June 1970 In the Eyes of the Ancestors: Belief and Behavior in a Mayan Community. ... 1993 “Maya Household Production in the Modern World. ... 2001 Mayan Visions: The Quest for Autonomy in an Age ofGlobalization.

Dissident Women

Yielding pivotal new perspectives on the indigenous women of Mexico, this book presents a diverse collection of voices exploring the human rights and gender issues that gained international attention after the first public appearance of the Zapatista National Liberation Army in 1994.

Las Abejas

The Reassertion of Indigenous Identity: Maya Responses to State Intervention: Chiapas. Latin American Research Review 30: 7–41. ——. 2001. Mayan Visions: the Quest for Autonomy in an Age of Globalization. New York and London: Routledge.

Las Abejas

First Published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Globalizing Education Educating the Local

Phillipe Lacoue-Labarthe, Jean-Luc Nancy. London: Routledge. Nancy, J-L., 2000. Being Singular Plural. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. Nash, J., 2001. Mayan Visions. The Quest for Autonomy in an Age of Globalization.

Globalizing Education  Educating the Local

Provides a critical account of how contemporary educational knowledge is put together and presented in the global knowledge economy, redefining the actors in the education process, including principally the child, pupil, and learner, but also the teacher, parent, inspector and policy-maker.

Elusive Unity

“Ethnic Mobilization among the Maya of Yucatán Today.” Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic ... Maya Intellectual Renaissance: Identity, Representation and Leadership. ... Mayan Visions: The Questfor Autonomy in an Age ofGlobalization.

Elusive Unity

In Elusive Unity, Armstrong-Fumero examines early twentieth-century peasant politics and twenty-first-century indigenous politics in the rural Oriente region of Yucatán. The rural inhabitants of this region have had some of their most important dealings with their nation’s government as self-identified “peasants” and “Maya.” Using ethnography, oral history, and archival research, Armstrong-Fumero shows how the same body of narrative tropes has defined the local experience of twentieth-century agrarianism and twenty-first-century multiculturalism. Through these recycled narratives, contemporary multicultural politics have also inherited some ambiguities that were built into its agrarian predecessor. Specifically, local experiences of peasant and indigenous politics are shaped by tensions between the vernacular language of identity and the intense factionalism that often defines the social organization of rural communities. This significant contribution will be of interest to historians, anthropologists, and political scientists studying Latin America and the Maya.

Mayan Calendar Prophecies Predictions for 2012 2052

A prophecy is usually the result of some type of vision or divine intervention received by a spiritual specialist like a shaman or priest. ... He noted that Mayan “prophets” did not simply receive visions and make random predictions.

Mayan Calendar Prophecies  Predictions for 2012 2052

Take a look at the science behind the Mayan calendar, prophecies and mythology. The Maya believed multiple cycles governed civilization. They created various calendars to track these cycles. Their short count calendar tracked a 256-year cycle believed to control epidemics, famines, warfare and more. Scientists have found a 250-year solar cycle that also appears to affect epidemics, famines, warfare and more. Their long count calendar tracked a 5000-year cycle related to natural disasters and cosmic catastrophes. Scientists have also discovered that the Earth is subjected to periodic bombardment by comets and asteroids that plunges the world into long periods of darkness and cold. Mayan mythology appears to record such events and in some instances even the exact dates on which these catastrophes occurred in the past. By comparing these dates with ice core records, sedimentary records, and climate records, this book reveals the truth about civilization's darkest days. And what may lie ahead in the future.