Framing Medieval Bodies

4 Michael Camille The image and the self : unwriting late medieval bodies The law constantly writes itself on bodies . It engraves itself on parchment made from the skin of its subjects . It articulates them in a juridicial corpus .

Framing Medieval Bodies

This text offers a wide-ranging analysis of the medieval body and its representations, covering the cultural, historical, literary and archaeological dimensions of the subject.

Medieval Bodies Life and Death in the Middle Ages

Unfolding like a medieval pageant, and filled with saints, soldiers, caliphs, queens, monks and monstrous beasts, this book throws light on the medieval body from head to toe—revealing the surprisingly sophisticated medical knowledge of ...

Medieval Bodies  Life and Death in the Middle Ages

With wit, wisdom, and a sharp scalpel, Jack Hartnell dissects the medieval body and offers a remedy to our preconceptions. Just like us, medieval men and women worried about growing old, got blisters and indigestion, fell in love, and had children. And yet their lives were full of miraculous and richly metaphorical experiences radically different from our own, unfolding in a world where deadly wounds might be healed overnight by divine intervention, or where the heart of a king, plucked from his corpse, could be held aloft as a powerful symbol of political rule. In this richly illustrated and unusual history, Jack Hartnell uncovers the fascinating ways in which people thought about, explored, and experienced their physical selves in the Middle Ages, from Constantinople to Cairo and Canterbury. Unfolding like a medieval pageant, and filled with saints, soldiers, caliphs, queens, monks and monstrous beasts, this book throws light on the medieval body from head to toe—revealing the surprisingly sophisticated medical knowledge of the time. Bringing together medicine, art, music, politics, philosophy, religion, and social history, Hartnell's work is an excellent guide to what life was really like for the men and women who lived and died in the Middle Ages. Perfumed and decorated with gold, fetishized or tortured, powerful even beyond death, these medieval bodies are not passive and buried away; they can still teach us what it means to be human. Some images in this ebook are not displayed due to permissions issues.

Medieval Monstrosity and the Female Body

“The Person in the Form: Medieval Challenges to Bodily 'Order.'” In Framing Medieval Bodies, eds. Sarah Kay and Miri Rubin. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1994: 100–122. Russell, Jeffrey Burton. Witchcraft in the Middle Ages.

Medieval Monstrosity and the Female Body

The medieval monster is a slippery construct, and its referents include a range of religious, racial, and corporeal aberrations. In this study, Miller argues that one incarnation of monstrosity in the Middle Ages—the female body—exists in special relation to medieval teratology insofar as it resists the customary marginalization that defined most other monstrous groups in the Middle Ages. Though medieval maps located the monstrous races on the distant margins of the civilized world, the monstrous female body took the form of mother, sister, wife, and daughter. It was, therefore, pervasive, proximate, and necessary on social, sexual, and reproductive grounds. Miller considers several significant texts representing authoritative discourses on female monstrosity in the Middle Ages: the Pseudo-Ovidian poem, De vetula (The Old Woman); a treatise on human generation erroneously attributed to Albert the Great, De secretis mulierum (On the Secrets of Women), and Julian of Norwich’s Showings. Through comparative analysis, Miller grapples with the monster’s semantic flexibility while simultaneously working towards a composite image of late-medieval female monstrosity whose features are stable enough to define. Whether this body is discursively constructed as an Ovidian body, a medicalized body, or a mystical body, its corporeal boundaries fail to form properly: it is a body out of bounds.

Medieval Theology and the Natural Body

Exemplified in Green's fundamental and brilliant work on medieval women's medicine and women's bodies is a seamless integration of a modern critical 33 The relics of Christ's blood are the subject of N. Vincent's Henry III and the Holy ...

Medieval Theology and the Natural Body

New interdisciplinary essays on the treatment of the body in medieval theology.

Social Identity in Early Medieval Britain

Early medieval bodies are now almost impenetrable to us in any investigation. What we have been left with are a select sample of the lifeless skeletal remains of the inhumed and the cremated. Such physical reminders of the previous ...

Social Identity in Early Medieval Britain

Social identity is a concept od increasing importance in the social sciences. Here, the concept is applied to the often atheoretical realm of medieval studies. Each contributor focuses on a particular topic of early medieval identity - ethnicity, national identity, social location, subjectivity/personhood, political organization, kiship, the body, gender, age, proximity/regionality, memory and ideological systems. The result is a pioneering vision of medieval social identity and a challenge to some of the received general wisdoms about this period.

Disability in Medieval Europe

Inspired by the work of Foucault, there has been a surge of interest in bodies, both historical and contemporary. For the medieval period, notable examples include the volume edited by Sarah Kay and Miri Rubin, Framing Medieval Bodies, ...

Disability in Medieval Europe

This impressive volume presents a thorough examination of all aspects of physical impairment and disability in medieval Europe. Examining a popular era that is of great interest to many historians and researchers, Irene Metzler presents a theoretical framework of disability and explores key areas such as: medieval theoretical concepts theology and natural philosophy notions of the physical body medical theory and practice. Bringing into play the modern day implications of medieval thought on the issue, this is a fascinating and informative addition to the research studies of medieval history, history of medicine and disability studies scholars the English-speaking world over.

Handbook of Medieval Studies

[1984]: 129–46; Wolfgang Brandt, “Die Beschreibung häßlicher Menschen,” GRM 35 [1985]: 257–78; Shulamith Shahar, “The Old Body in Medieval Culture,” Framing Medieval Bodies, ed. Sarah Kay and Miri Rubin, 1994, 160–86).

Handbook of Medieval Studies

This interdisciplinary handbook provides extensive information about research in medieval studies and its most important results over the last decades. The handbook is a reference work which enables the readers to quickly and purposely gain insight into the important research discussions and to inform themselves about the current status of research in the field. The handbook consists of four parts. The first, large section offers articles on all of the main disciplines and discussions of the field. The second section presents articles on the key concepts of modern medieval studies and the debates therein. The third section is a lexicon of the most important text genres of the Middle Ages. The fourth section provides an international bio-bibliographical lexicon of the most prominent medievalists in all disciplines. A comprehensive bibliography rounds off the compendium. The result is a reference work which exhaustively documents the current status of research in medieval studies and brings the disciplines and experts of the field together.

Body and Sacred Place in Medieval Europe 1100 1389

Framing Medieval Bodies. Manchester, England; New York: Manchester University Press, 1994. Kennedy, V.L. “The Handbook of Master Peter Chancellor of Chartres.” Mediaeval Studies 5 (1943): 1–38. Kirby, Larry Joseph.

Body and Sacred Place in Medieval Europe  1100   1389

Body and Sacred Place in Medieval Europe investigates the medieval understanding of sacred place, arguing for the centrality of bodies and bodily metaphors to the establishment, function, use, and power of medieval churches. Questioning the traditional division of sacred and profane jurisdictions, this book identifies the need to consider non-devotional uses of churches in the Middle Ages. Dawn Marie Hayes examines idealized visions of medieval sacred places in contrast with the mundane and profane uses of these buildings. She argues that by the later Middle Ages-as loyalties were torn by emerging political, economic, and social groups-the Church suffered a loss of security that was reflected in the uses of sacred spaces, which became more restricted as identities shifted and Europeans ordered the ambiguity of the medieval world.

Women and Gender in Medieval Europe

The Eucharist offered an especially potent symbol of Christ's physicality and humanity, uniting women's bodies and Christ. ... Holy Feast and Holy Fast: The Religious Significance of Food to Medieval Women.

Women and Gender in Medieval Europe

From women's medicine and the writings of Christine de Pizan to the lives of market and tradeswomen and the idealization of virginity, gender and social status dictated all aspects of women's lives during the middle ages. A cross-disciplinary resource, Women and Gender in Medieval Europe examines the daily reality of medieval women from all walks of life in Europe between 450 CE and 1500 CE, i.e., from the fall of the Roman Empire to the discovery of the Americas. Moving beyond biographies of famous noble women of the middles ages, the scope of this important reference work is vast and provides a comprehensive understanding of medieval women's lives and experiences. Masculinity in the middle ages is also addressed to provide important context for understanding women's roles. Entries that range from 250 words to 4,500 words in length thoroughly explore topics in the following areas: · Art and Architecture · Countries, Realms, and Regions · Daily Life · Documentary Sources · Economics · Education and Learning · Gender and Sexuality · Historiography · Law · Literature · Medicine and Science · Music and Dance · Persons · Philosophy · Politics · Political Figures · Religion and Theology · Religious Figures · Social Organization and Status Written by renowned international scholars, Women and Gender in Medieval Europe is the latest in the Routledge Encyclopedias of the Middle Ages. Easily accessible in an A-to-Z format, students, researchers, and scholars will find this outstanding reference work to be an invaluable resource on women in Medieval Europe.

Feminist Approaches to the Body in Medieval Literature

is , as fleshly bodies , just as Dante Alighieri's spiritual journey to God was cast in the form of an actual , physical ... images of the dying Christ , effigies of holy persons , saintly body parts — found in medieval cathedrals .

Feminist Approaches to the Body in Medieval Literature

Feminist Approaches to the Body in Medieval Literature forges a new link between contemporary feminist and cultural theory and medieval history and literature. The essays establish crucial historical connections between feminist theorizing about the body and specific accounts of gendered bodies in medieval texts.

The Spectacle of the Body in Late Medieval England

The Spectacle of the Body in Late Medieval England uses a flexible feminist, psychoanalytic and post-structuralist methodology to investigate late medieval concepts and performances of the body in western Europe, with an emphasis on ...

The Spectacle of the Body in Late Medieval England

The volume The Spectacle of the Body in Late Medieval England represents a study on the human body representation in medieval England by approaching the concept of the spectacle as a space of manifestation. The author clarifies the ways of understanding the body as a physical and metaphorical reality, but also the medieval conceptualization of violence. On top of that, the author is making an investigation on the violent character of spectacles' representation in pursuit of picturing this subject more clearly and more relevant. The approach of the volume is dominantly Christian reviewing the representations of the body through outstanding figures of Christianity (crucifixion of Jesus Christ, body of Virgin Mary).

Bodies of Pain

“The Image and the Self: Unwriting Late Medieval Bodies.” In Framing Medieval Bodies, ed. Sarah Kay and Miri Rubin, 62—99. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1994. Campbell, Ian R. “An Act of Mercy: The Cadoc Episode in Hartmann ...

Bodies of Pain

First Published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Ends of the Body

Collections of essays focusing on the body in the Middle Ages are faced with the similarly daunting task of defining and circumscribing the parameters of the medieval body. Sarah Kay and Miri Rubin, in Framing Medieval Bodies, ...

The Ends of the Body

Drawing on Arabic, English, French, Irish, Latin and Spanish sources, the essays share a focus on the body’s productive capacity – whether expressed through the flesh’s materiality, or through its role in performing meaning. The collection is divided into four clusters. ‘Foundations’ traces the use of physical remnants of the body in the form of relics or memorial monuments that replicate the form of the body as foundational in communal structures; ‘Performing the Body’ focuses on the ways in which the individual body functions as the medium through which the social body is maintained; ‘Bodily Rhetoric’ explores the poetic linkage of body and meaning; and ‘Material Bodies’ engages with the processes of corporeal being, ranging from the energetic flow of humoural liquids to the decay of the flesh. Together, the essays provide new perspectives on the centrality of the medieval body and underscore the vitality of this rich field of study.

Flesh and Word

every level of medieval discourse'20, as Suzanne Conklin Akbari and Jill Ross phrase it, and it is important to draw attention to the processes which shape and form these nuanced representations of bodies in medieval texts.

Flesh and Word

Bodies and their role in cultural discourse have been a constant focus in the humanities and social sciences in recent years, but comparatively few studies exist about Old Norse-Icelandic or early Irish literature. This study aims to redress this imbalance and presents carefully contextualised close readings of medieval texts. The chapters focus on the role of bodies in mediality discourse in various contexts: that of identity in relation to ideas about self and other, of inscribed and marked skin and of natural bodily matters such as defecation, urination and menstruation. By carefully discussing the sources in their cultural contexts, it becomes apparent that medieval Scandinavian and early Irish texts present their very own ideas about bodies and their role in structuring the narrated worlds of the texts. The study presents one of the first systematic examinations of bodies in these two literary traditions in terms of body criticism and emphasises the ingenuity and complexity of medieval texts.

Writing Religious Women

Framing Medieval Bodies ( Manchester , 1994 ) , 24–42 ( 24 ) . J. McEnvoy , ' Grosseteste on the Soul's Care for the Body : A New Text and New Sources for the Idea ' , in Freibergs ( ed . ) , Aspectus and Affectus , 37–56 ( 42–3 ) .

Writing Religious Women

This collection of commissioned essays explores women's vernacular theology through a wide range of medieval prose and verse texts, from saints' lives to visionary literature. Employing a historicist methodology, the essays are sited at the intersection of two discursive fields: female spiritual practice and female textual practice. The contributors are primarily interested in the relation of women to religious books, as writers, receivers, and as objects of representation. They focus on historical approaches to the question of women's spirituality, and generically unrestricted examinations of issues of female literacy, book ownership, and reading practice. The essays are grouped under four main themes: the influence of anchoritic spirituality upon later lay piety, Carthusian links with female spirituality, the representation of femininity in Anglo-Norman and Middle English religious poetry, and veneration, performance and delusion in the Book of Margery Kempe.

Fleshly Things and Spiritual Matters

Studies on the Medieval Body in Honour of Margaret Bridges Nicole Nyffenegger, Katrin Rupp. that we distinguish between body and ... Bodies, medieval and modern, offer a vast field of research and will continue to keep scholars busy.

Fleshly Things and Spiritual Matters

This book offers fresh insights into the plethora of medieval bodies and the multiple perspectives that can be assumed in their discussion. The ten essays by internationally renowned scholars and young academics encompass diverse approaches to the body such as the function of gestures, the gendered gaze, the body’s spatial and geographical positioning, the (dis)integrity of the body or the connection between linguistic uses of ‘body’ and physical bodies. While most of the contributions of this collection are in the field of medieval English literature, they underline the value of interdisciplinary approaches which connect them with neighbouring disciplines such as modern literature and arts, history, theology and gender studies. Contributors: Katharina Berger-Meister, Guillemette Bolens, Leslie Dunton-Downer, Laurie Finke, Angelina Keller, Andy Kelly, Fabienne Michelet, R. Allen Shoaf, Lotta Sigurdsson, and Paul Taylor.

Signs of Devotion

The Cult of St. ®thelthryth in Medieval England, 695-1615 Virginia Blanton ... Anthropological research like Douglas's has provided an avenue for scholars to examine medieval bodies as metaphoric or symbolic spaces.

Signs of Devotion


Excrement in the Late Middle Ages

Roberta Gilchrist, “Medieval Bodies in the Material World: Gender, Stigma and the Body,” in Framing Medieval Bodies, ed. Sarah Kay and Miri Rubin (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1994), p. 59 [43–61).

Excrement in the Late Middle Ages

This interdisciplinary book intergrates the historical practices regarding material excrement and its symbolic representation, concluding that excrement is a moral and ethical category deserving scrutiny.

Monstrosity Disability and the Posthuman in the Medieval and Early Modern World

Leah Pope Parker explores the aberrance of the body in Medieval Christianity. Her “Eschatology for Cannibals: A System of Aberrance in the Old English Andreas” interrogates the vulnerable and aberrant bodies of saints in order to ...

Monstrosity  Disability  and the Posthuman in the Medieval and Early Modern World

This collection examines the intersection of the discourses of “disability” and “monstrosity” in a timely and necessary intervention in the scholarly fields of Disability Studies and Monster Studies. Analyzing Medieval and Early Modern art and literature replete with images of non-normative bodies, these essays consider the pernicious history of defining people with distinctly non-normative bodies or non-normative cognition as monsters. In many cases throughout Western history, a figure marked by what Rosemarie Garland-Thomson has termed “the extraordinary body” is labeled a “monster.” This volume explores the origins of this conflation, examines the problems and possibilities inherent in it, and casts both disability and monstrosity in light of emergent, empowering discourses of posthumanism.

Fallen Bodies

Pollution, Sexuality, and Demonology in the Middle Ages Dyan Elliott. MEDIEVAL STUDIES , EUROPEAN HISTORY Medieval clerics believed that original sin had rendered their " fallen bodies " vulnerable to corrupting impulsesparticularly ...

Fallen Bodies

Medieval clerics believed that original sin had rendered their "fallen bodies" vulnerable to corrupting impulses—particularly those of a sexual nature. They feared that their corporeal frailty left them susceptible to demonic forces bent on penetrating and polluting their bodies and souls. Drawing on a variety of canonical and other sources, Fallen Bodies examines a wide-ranging set of issues generated by fears of pollution, sexuality, and demonology. To maintain their purity, celibate clerics combated the stain of nocturnal emissions; married clerics expelled their wives onto the streets and out of the historical record; an exemplum depicting a married couple having sex in church was told and retold; and the specter of the demonic lover further stigmatized women's sexuality. Over time, the clergy's conceptions of womanhood became radically polarized: the Virgin Mary was accorded ever greater honor, while real, corporeal women were progressively denigrated. When church doctrine definitively denied the physicality of demons, the female body remained as the prime material presence of sin. Dyan Elliott contends that the Western clergy's efforts to contain sexual instincts—and often the very thought and image of woman—precipitated uncanny returns of the repressed. She shows how this dynamic ultimately resulted in the progressive conflation of the female and the demonic, setting the stage for the future persecution of witches.