Medieval Education

medieval education, except for university education, has not been as lively a locus of publication in recent decades as the related field of medieval literacy.2 The essays in this book are grouped under three headings: (I) The ...

Medieval Education

This volume offers original studies on the subject of medieval education, not only in the formal academic sense typical of schools and universities but also in a broader cultural sense that includes law, liturgy, and the new religious orders of the high Middle Ages. Its essays explore the transmission of knowledge during the middle ages in various kinds of educational communities, including schools, scriptoria, universities, and workshops.

Elementary and Grammar Education in Late Medieval France

The literature surrounding the subject of medieval education is, at the same time, both extensive and limited. There is a tremendous amount of literature concerned with scholasticism, the schools of the twelfth century, ...

Elementary and Grammar Education in Late Medieval France

The fourteenth and fifteenth centuries saw a marked increase in the availability of elementary and grammar education in Europe. In France, that rise took the form of a unique blend of trends also seen elsewhere in Europe, ranging from Church-dominated schools to independent schools and communal groups of teachers. Lyon, long a crossroad of ideas from north and south, was home to a particularly interesting blend of approaches, and in this book Sarah Lynch offers a close analysis of the educational landscape of the city, showing how schools and teachers were organised and how they interacted with each other and with ecclesiastical and municipal authorities.

The Development of Education in Medieval Iceland

Medieval Education To understand how education developed in medieval Iceland, we must have a general sense of medieval education as a whole.19 Ideas and institutions were brought to Iceland with Christianization, and adapted there to ...

The Development of Education in Medieval Iceland

Medieval Iceland is known for the fascinating body of literary works it produced, from ornate court poetry to mythological treatises to sagas of warrior-poets and feud culture. This book investigates the institutions and practices of education which lay behind not only this literary corpus, but the whole of medieval Icelandic culture, religion, and society. By bringing together a broad spectrum of sources, including sagas, law codes, and grammatical treatises, it addresses the history of education in medieval Iceland from multiple perspectives. It shows how the slowly developing institutions of the church shaped educational practices within an entirely rural society with its own distinct vernacular culture. It emphasizes the importance of Latin, despite the lack of surviving manuscripts, and teaching and learning in a highly decentralized environment. Within this context, it explores how medieval grammatical education was adapted for bilingual clerical education, which in turn helped create a separate and fully vernacularized grammatical discourse.

Medieval Monastic Education

Recently a number of books have been published in France that deal with medieval education (e.g. Laurioux and Moulinier, 1998; Verger, 1999)} Both studies offer an excellent introduction to educational trends in the central and later ...

Medieval Monastic Education

While the role of monastic education has been studied in great detail in regard to male practices, this book examines the differences between the monastic formation and education of men and of women in Western Europe from the eighth to the sixteenth century. Fourteen chapters, written by well-known scholars, consider monastic education and practices in the geographical areas of England, France, Germany and the Low Countries. Using attitudes toward education and actual educational theories, the authors explore issues such as the use of music and physical training in education to explore new realms of the discipline.

Humanism and Education in Medieval and Renaissance Italy

( ) of the Comoediae, who claimed to have spent years teaching Venetian youths, made this point. ... has been offered by historians of schools and teaching: if medieval education is identified with Aristotelian scholasticism, ...

Humanism and Education in Medieval and Renaissance Italy

Based on the study of over 500 surviving manuscript school books, this comprehensive 2001 study of the curriculum of school education in medieval and Renaissance Italy contains some surprising conclusions. Robert Black's analysis finds that continuity and conservatism, not innovation, characterize medieval and Renaissance teaching. The study of classical texts in medieval Italian schools reached its height in the twelfth century; this was followed by a collapse in the thirteenth century, an effect on school teaching of the growth of university education. This collapse was only gradually reversed in the two centuries that followed: it was not until the later 1400s that humanists began to have a significant impact on education. Scholars of European history, of Renaissance studies, and of the history of education will find that this deeply researched and broad-ranging book challenges much inherited wisdom about education, humanism and the history of ideas.

Healers in the Making Students Physicians and Medical Education in Medieval Bologna 1250 1550

Roberts, Phyllis B. “Sermons and Preaching in/ and the medieval University.” Medieval Education. ... Sigerist, Henry E. “Bedside Manners in the Middle Ages; the Treatise de cautelis medicorum Attributed to Arnald of Villanova.

Healers in the Making  Students  Physicians  and Medical Education in Medieval Bologna  1250 1550

In Healers in the Making, Kira Robison investigates medical instruction at the University of Bologna using the lens of practical medicine, examining both the formation of medical authority and innovations in practical medical pedagogy during the late medieval period.

Library of Congress Subject Headings

... 5001500 Medieval altarpieces USE Altarpieces , Medieval Medieval and modern Latin manuscripts USE Manuscripts , Latin ... Medieval Medieval ecclesiastical embroidery USE Ecclesiastical embroidery , Medieval Medieval education USE ...

Library of Congress Subject Headings


Gentry Culture in Late Medieval England

Much authoritative work has been written on late medieval education and on the song schools provided by parish and great religious house alike . The hard evidence siting the gentry within these various contexts , however , proves more ...

Gentry Culture in Late Medieval England

Essays in this collection examine the lifestyles and attitudes of the gentry in late-medieval England. Through surveys of the gentry's military background, administrative and political roles, social behavior, and education, the reader is provided with an overview of how the group's culture evolved and how it was disseminated.

Women in Early Medieval China

Women from elite families not only grew up in a refined domestic atmosphere, but due to the nature of medieval education, also had considerable educational opportunities. Under the Han dynasty, government schools had trained young men ...

Women in Early Medieval China

This important study provides the only comprehensive survey of Chinese women during the early medieval period of disunion known as the Six Dynasties, which lasted from the fall of the Eastern Han dynasty in AD 220 to the reunification of China by the Sui dynasty in AD 581.

Higher Education and the Growth of Knowledge

Medieval Intermezzo Higher learning in the medieval Islamic world was basically religious Monotheistic religious education, inaugurated by Judaism, influenced, and was in turn influenced by, other educational traditions, including the ...

Higher Education and the Growth of Knowledge

This book sketches the history of higher education, in parallel with the development of science. Its goal is to draw attention to the historical tensions between the aims of higher education and those of science, in the hope of contributing to improving the contemporary university. A helpful tool in analyzing these intellectual and social tensions is Karl Popper's philosophy of science demarcating science and its social context. Popper defines a society that encourages criticism as "open," and argues convincingly that an open society is the most appropriate one for the growth of science. A "closed society," on the other hand, is a tribal and dogmatic society. Despite being the universal home of science today, the university, as an institution that is thousands of years old, carries traces of different past cultural, social, and educational traditions. The book argues that, by and large, the university was, and still is, a closed society and does not serve the best interests of the development of science and of students' education.

A History of Educational Thought

EVALUATION The weakness of medieval education was its lack of interest in the experimental sciences. Truth was regarded as an absolute standard. Heresy was not to be tolerated. Knowledge was to be a rigorous process; it was not to be ...

A History of Educational Thought


Higher Education in Liquid Modernity

The comparison with medieval education has a further unique bearing on our conversation for the simple fact that the university today is still directly connected to its medieval roots. Despite the changes that have taken place in the ...

Higher Education in Liquid Modernity

Based in sociologist Zygmunt Bauman’s theory of liquid modernity, this volume describes and critiques key aspects and practices of liquid education--education as market-driven consumption, short life span of useful knowledge, overabundance of information--through a systematic comparison with ancient Greek paideia and medieval university education, producing a sweeping analysis of the history and philosophy ofeducation for the purpose of understanding current higher education, positing a more holisitic alternative model in which students are embedded in a learning commutity that is itself embedded in a larger society. If liquid modernity has left a vacuum where, according to Bauman, the pilot’s cabin is empty, this volume argues that no structure is better positioned to fill this vacuum than the university and outlines a renewed vision of social transformation through higher education.

Jews in the Early Modern World

In the area of medieval Jewish education , the work of Ivan G. Marcus and Ephraim Kanarfogel has been central . See Marcus ' Rituals of Childhood : Jewish Acculturation in Medieval Europe ( New Haven , CT , 1996 ) and Kanarfogel's ...

Jews in the Early Modern World

Jews in the Early Modern World presents a comparative and global history of the Jews for the early modern period, 1400-1700. It traces the remarkable demographic changes experienced by Jews around the globe and assesses the impact of those changes on Jewish communal and social structures, religious and cultural practices, and relations with non-Jews.

Higher Education

Education : ( 1 ) Second year - history of ancient and medieval philosophy , history of ancient and medieval education , general biology , logic , experimental psychology , foreign language II ; ( 2 ) third year - history of modern and ...

Higher Education


Challenging Life Existential Questions as a Resource for Education

The medieval convent or cathedral school was an important prerequisite for Renaissance schools and until the 18th century, you can talk about a literary continuity, based on the clerical education system and its pedagogical intentions ...

Challenging Life  Existential Questions as a Resource for Education

There is an increasing recognition today that young people need to have knowledge about religions and world views in order to live and work in diverse societies. What kind of 'maps' are they provided with through religious, values and ethics education? Does education address the challenging existential questions that children and adolescents ask about life and the world? This volume addresses different aspects of how existential questions have been dealt with in educational research. It especially draws attention to the Swedish research tradition of focusing on life questions and the interpretation of life in education, but with contemporary international research added. It also addresses issues of ethics education and discusses possible options for the future of existential questions as a resource for education.

Division of Education Programs

The University of Wisconsin Madison , Wisconsin Medieval Studies : An Interdisciplinary Approach a Founded in 1849 , the University of Wisconsin is a state - supported institution offering undergraduate and graduate degrees in all major ...

Division of Education Programs


The Canonesses and Education in the Early Middle Ages

To judge aright of this aspect of feminine education , it is necessary to bear in mind that medieval education cannot be correctly estimated by modern standards . Social standards and conditions during the Middle Ages were very ...

The Canonesses and Education in the Early Middle Ages


Renaissance Humanism from the Middle Ages to Modern Times

Renaissance humanism found its place under the educational sun by creating what medieval education lacked: a middle school system; and if one had no desire to become a lawyer, doctor, or theologian, then humanistic training adequately ...

Renaissance Humanism  from the Middle Ages to Modern Times

Starting with an essay on the Renaissance as the concluding phase of the Middle Ages and ending with appreciations of Paul Oskar Kristeller, the great twentieth-century scholar of the Renaissance, this new volume by John Monfasani brings together seventeen articles that focus both on individuals, such as Erasmus of Rotterdam, Angelo Poliziano, Marsilio Ficino, and Niccolò Perotti, and on large-scale movements, such as the spread of Italian humanism, Ciceronianism, Biblical criticism, and the Plato-Aristotle Controversy. In addition to entering into the persistent debate on the nature of the Renaissance, the articles in the volume also engage what of late have become controversial topics, namely, the shape and significance of Renaissance humanism and the character of the Platonic Academy in Florence.

The Universities of Europe in the Middle Ages

education apart altogether from any theological interpreta- CHAP . II . tion which might be put upon them . All culture that was not obviously and immediately useful was doomed to extinction . Christianity at least considerably widened ...

The Universities of Europe in the Middle Ages


Handbook of Medieval Studies

fields than its present-day English counterpart (see Jorge J. E.Gracia, “Philosophy in the Middle Ages: An Introduction,”A ... Philosophy itself had no formal place within the trivium and quadrivium of the medieval educational system; ...

Handbook of Medieval Studies

This interdisciplinary handbook provides extensive information about research in medieval studies and its most important results over the last decades. The handbook is a reference work which enables the readers to quickly and purposely gain insight into the important research discussions and to inform themselves about the current status of research in the field. The handbook consists of four parts. The first, large section offers articles on all of the main disciplines and discussions of the field. The second section presents articles on the key concepts of modern medieval studies and the debates therein. The third section is a lexicon of the most important text genres of the Middle Ages. The fourth section provides an international bio-bibliographical lexicon of the most prominent medievalists in all disciplines. A comprehensive bibliography rounds off the compendium. The result is a reference work which exhaustively documents the current status of research in medieval studies and brings the disciplines and experts of the field together.