Medieval Monastic Education

While the role of monastic education has been studied in great detail in regard to male practices, this book examines the differences between the monastic formation and education of men and of women in Western Europe from the eighth to the ...

Medieval Monastic Education

While the role of monastic education has been studied in great detail in regard to male practices, this book examines the differences between the monastic formation and education of men and of women in Western Europe from the eighth to the sixteenth century. Fourteen chapters, written by well-known scholars, consider monastic education and practices in the geographical areas of England, France, Germany and the Low Countries. Using attitudes toward education and actual educational theories, the authors explore issues such as the use of music and physical training in education to explore new realms of the discipline.

Medieval Monastic Education

Jaeger's development of a scholarly terminology regarding pedagogy and attitudes toward teaching and learning is a welcome tool in the study of medieval monastic education. Behind the activity of learning in monastic milieus are a ...

Medieval Monastic Education

While the role of monastic education has been studied in great detail in regard to male practices, this book examines the differences between the monastic formation and education of men and of women in Western Europe from the eighth to the sixteenth century. Fourteen chapters, written by well-known scholars, consider monastic education and practices in the geographical areas of England, France, Germany and the Low Countries. Using attitudes toward education and actual educational theories, the authors explore issues such as the use of music and physical training in education to explore new realms of the discipline.

Medieval Education

Training for the liturgy as a form of monastic education. In Medieval monastic education, edited by George Ferzoco and Carolyn Muessig. London and New York: Leicester University Press. Courtenay, William J. 1999.

Medieval Education

This volume offers original studies on the subject of medieval education, not only in the formal academic sense typical of schools and universities but also in a broader cultural sense that includes law, liturgy, and the new religious orders of the high Middle Ages. Its essays explore the transmission of knowledge during the middle ages in various kinds of educational communities, including schools, scriptoria, universities, and workshops.

The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West

23 Carolingian Monastic Schools and Reform John J. Contreni Monastic communities in the post-Roman world and the Carolingian age, often despite themselves, became major forces in the creation of a new European culture.

The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West

Monasticism, in all of its variations, was a feature of almost every landscape in the medieval West. So ubiquitous were religious women and men throughout the Middle Ages that all medievalists encounter monasticism in their intellectual worlds. While there is enormous interest in medieval monasticism among Anglophone scholars, language is often a barrier to accessing some of the most important and groundbreaking research emerging from Europe. The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West offers a comprehensive treatment of medieval monasticism, from Late Antiquity to the end of the Middle Ages. The essays, specially commissioned for this volume and written by an international team of scholars, with contributors from Australia, Belgium, Canada, England, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland, and the United States, cover a range of topics and themes and represent the most up-to-date discoveries on this topic.

The Development of Education in Medieval Iceland

360 Monastic education is one of the most enigmatic aspects of the history of education in medieval Iceland, and yet was a vital part of it. The main narrative sources for the medieval Icelandic church, the biskupasǫgur, offer little ...

The Development of Education in Medieval Iceland

Medieval Iceland is known for the fascinating body of literary works it produced, from ornate court poetry to mythological treatises to sagas of warrior-poets and feud culture. This book investigates the institutions and practices of education which lay behind not only this literary corpus, but the whole of medieval Icelandic culture, religion, and society. By bringing together a broad spectrum of sources, including sagas, law codes, and grammatical treatises, it addresses the history of education in medieval Iceland from multiple perspectives. It shows how the slowly developing institutions of the church shaped educational practices within an entirely rural society with its own distinct vernacular culture. It emphasizes the importance of Latin, despite the lack of surviving manuscripts, and teaching and learning in a highly decentralized environment. Within this context, it explores how medieval grammatical education was adapted for bilingual clerical education, which in turn helped create a separate and fully vernacularized grammatical discourse.

Daily Life in Medieval Europe

Monasteries by contrast were concentrated literate communities that served as focal points for study and education . Monastic schools were especially influential during the early Middle Ages , at a time when other educational ...

Daily Life in Medieval Europe

An exploration of both private and public life in the Middle Ages covers society, the life cycle, material culture, life in villages, castles, monasteries, and towns, and the medieval world, plus games, food, and music.

A History of Western Philosophy of Education in the Middle Ages and Renaissance

In this first of the medieval renaissances, we can identify the particular “turn” the monastic movement brought to Western education. It received—initially skeptically, but soon enthusiastically—the tradition of classical paideia and ...

A History of Western Philosophy of Education in the Middle Ages and Renaissance

This volume traces the history of Western philosophy of education from the Medieval through the Renaissance period (500-1550). This vast expanse of time includes the rise of Christian monasticism (one of the most enduring and revolutionary models of education in the history of the West), the birth of Islam (with its advances in mathematical, scientific, and philosophical reasoning), the rise of the university (as an emerging force distinct from ecclesiastical and state control), and the dawn of the Enlightenment. It includes chapters on the educational thought of Benedict, Abelard, Heloise, Aquinas, Maimonides, the prophet Mohammaed, Hrosvitha of Ganderscheim, Hildegard of Bingen, among others. It also considers the educational impact of Reformation thinkers like Erasmus and Luther, and Renaissance thinkers such as Montaigne. About A History of Western Philosophy of Education: An essential resource for researchers, scholars, and students of education, this five-volume set that traces the development of philosophy of education through Western culture and history. Focusing on philosophers who have theorized education and its implementation, the series constitutes a fresh, dynamic, and developing view of educational philosophy. It expands our educational possibilities by reinvigorating philosophy's vibrant critical tradition, connecting old and new perspectives, and identifying the continuity of critique and reconstruction. It also includes a timeline showing major historical events, including educational initiatives and the publication of noteworthy philosophical works.

Monastic Hospitality

41-72 ; Medieval Monastic Education , ed . G. Ferzoco and C. Muessig ( London , 2002 ) . More recently , interest has been fuelled in gardens and animals within the monastery precinct . 107 S. Bonde and C. Maines , “ The archaeology of ...

Monastic Hospitality

How guests were cared for in medieval monasteries, exploring the administrative, financial, spiritual and other implications.

The Grammar Schools of Medieval England

This paucity of educational material ought, in fact, to dispose of any notion that monks were the main educators of the Middle Ages.60 In order to help sever the association of monasteries and education once and for all, ...

The Grammar Schools of Medieval England

The greatest single contribution to the history of the grammar schools of medieval England, including the famous public schools of Winchester and Eton, was made between 1890 and 1915 by Arthur Francis Leach (1851-1915). A graduate of Winchester and All Souls College, Oxford and a member of the Middle Temple, Leach was appointed under Prime Minister Gladstone to the Charity Commission where he was involved in the implementation of the Endowed Schools Act of 1869.

Medieval Monastic Preaching

Research interests include the sermons of Jacques de Vitry , monastic history , and medieval women's education . Co - editor of Medieval Sermon Studies . V.M. O'Mara , Lecturer in English , University of Hull .

Medieval Monastic Preaching

This book demonstrates that monastic preaching was a diverse activity which included preaching by monks, nuns and heretics. The study offers a preliminary step in understanding how preaching shaped monastic identity in the Middle Ages.

Imagining the Human Condition in Medieval Rome

On ornamental and figurative wall painting in Cistercian monasteries , see David Park , ' Cistercian Wall Painting ... in Late Medieval England ' , in George Ferzoco and Caroline Muessig ( eds ) , Medieval Monastic Education ( London ...

Imagining the Human Condition in Medieval Rome

The first monograph on the Vita Humana cycle at Tre Fontane, this book includes an overview of the medieval history of the Roman Cistercian abbey and its architecture, as well as a consideration of the political and cultural standing of the abbey both within Papal Rome and within the Cistercian order. It considers the commission of the fresco cycle, the circumstances of its making and its position within the art historical context of the Roman Duecento. Examining the unusual blend of images in the Vita Humana cycle, this study offers a more nuanced picture of the iconographic repertoire of medieval art.

The Experience of Education in Anglo Saxon Literature

Training for the Liturgy as a Form of Monastic Education. In Medieval Monastic Education, eds. George Ferzoco and Carolyn Muessig, 7–20. London and New York: Leicester University Press, 2000. Brakke, David.

The Experience of Education in Anglo Saxon Literature

Reveals the rich emotional experience of teaching and learning as revealed in Anglo-Saxon literature.

Young Choristers 650 1700

1 Susan Boynton, “The Liturgical Role of Children in Monastic Customaries from the Central Middle Ages,” Studia ... 6 See Susan Boynton, “Training for the Liturgy as a Form of Monastic Education,” in Medieval Monastic Education, ed.

Young Choristers  650 1700

First full-length consideration of the role played by young singers, bringing out its full significance and its development over time.

Cistercian Stories for Nuns and Monks

Plainsong and Medieval Music 11 (2002): 25–35. ———. “Monastic Educational Culture Revisited: The Witness of Zwiefalten and the Hirsau Reform.” In Medieval Monastic Education, edited by George Ferzoco and Carolyn Muessig, 182–97.

Cistercian Stories for Nuns and Monks

Around the year 1200, the Cistercian Engelhard of Langheim dedicated a collection of monastic stories to a community of religious women. Martha G. Newman explores how this largely unedited collection of tales about Cistercian monks illuminates the religiosity of Cistercian nuns. As did other Cistercian storytellers, Engelhard recorded the miracles and visions of the order's illustrious figures, but he wrote from Franconia, in modern Germany, rather than the Cistercian heartland. His extant texts reflect his interactions with non-Cistercian monasteries and with Langheim's patrons rather than celebrating Bernard of Clairvaux. Engelhard was conservative, interested in maintaining traditional Cistercian patterns of thought. Nonetheless, by offering to women a collection of narratives that explore the oral qualities of texts, the nature of sight, and the efficacy of sacraments, Engelhard articulated a distinctive response to the social and intellectual changes of his period. In analyzing Engelhard's stories, Newman uncovers an understudied monastic culture that resisted the growing emphasis on the priestly administration of the sacraments and the hardening of gender distinctions. Engelhard assumed that monks and nuns shared similar interests and concerns, and he addressed his audiences as if they occupied a space neither fully sacerdotal nor completely lay, neither scholastic nor unlearned, and neither solely male nor only female. His exemplary narratives depict the sacramental value of everyday objects and behaviors whose efficacy relied more on individual spiritual formation than on sacerdotal action. By encouraging nuns and monks to imagine connections between heaven and earth, Engelhard taught faith as a learned disposition. Newman's study demonstrates that scholastic questions about signs, sacraments, and sight emerged in a narrative form within late twelfth-century monastic communities.

The Oxford Handbook of Christian Monasticism

Woodbridge : York Medieval Press . Kienzle , Beverly Mayne ( 2000 ) . ' Hildegard of Bingen's Teaching in Her Expositiones evangeliorum and Ordo virtutum ? In Medieval Monastic Education , edited by George Ferzoco and Carolyn Muessig ...

The Oxford Handbook of Christian Monasticism

The Oxford Handbook of Christian Monasticism addresses, for the first time in one volume, multiple strands of Christian monastic practice. Forty-four essays consider historical and thematic aspects of the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Protestant, and Anglican traditions, as well as contemporary 'new monasticism'.

Reading Matthew with Monks

Monastic customaries from Cluny during the period describe the oblates sitting in the chapter house, learning the chant ... 31Susan Boynton, “Training for the Liturgy as a Form of Monastic Education,” in Medieval Monastic Education, ed.

Reading Matthew with Monks

In Reading Matthew with Monks, Derek Olsen seeks to evaluate whether early medieval monastic biblical interpreters can serve as effective conversation partners for modern readers who are committed to broadening their reading of Scripture. Olsen puts the interpretations of four modern Scripture commentaries in conversation with Ælfric of Eynsham’s medieval monastic interpretations of four texts from the Gospel of Matthew. In so doing, he clarifies early medieval interpretive contexts and assesses their usefulness in modern scholarship. As outsiders in modern critical debates, Ælfric and his sources may provide alternative approaches or perspectives that open interpretive possibilities where modern interpreters are locked in disagreement. Early medieval monastic interpreters can serve as excellent guides for understanding the potential for moral, spiritual, or formative meanings of a biblical text. They can help modern readers who are attempting to conform their lives to the biblical text.

The Archaeology and History of Glastonbury Abbey

Glastonbury Abbey and Education NICHOLAS ORME That medieval monasteries were centres of education is a piece of popular folklore which , for once , has not been disproved by historical research . Until the end of the nineteenth century ...

The Archaeology and History of Glastonbury Abbey

Discussion of site and buildings, books and manuscripts, cultural life and traditions, from the earliest Anglo-Saxon period to the later middle ages.

Education in Twelfth century Art and Architecture

2 3 n. c. carpenter, Music in the Medieval and Renaissance Universities (norman oK, 1958), p. 17; S. Boynton, 'training for the liturgy as a form of Monastic Education', Medieval Monastic Education, ed. g. ferzoco and c.

Education in Twelfth century Art and Architecture

A study of the representation of education in material culture, at a period of considerable change and growth.

The Scribes for Women s Convents in Late Medieval Germany

'The Liturgical Role of Children in Monastic Customaries from the Central Middle Ages.' Studia Liturgica 28 (1998): 194–209. – 'Training for the Liturgy as a Form of Monastic Education.' In Medieval Monastic Education, ed.

The Scribes for Women s Convents in Late Medieval Germany

Cyrus demonstrates the prevalence of manuscript production by women monastics and challenges current assumptions of how manuscripts circulated in the late medieval period.

The Late Medieval English College and Its Context

... and although the college played a more prominent educational role in fifteenth-century england than the monastery, it was generally to the latter that late medieval nobility sent their own children for education.59 in other words, ...

The Late Medieval English College and Its Context

A wide ranging survey of the medieval secular college and its context.