Medieval Schools

Preface Medieval Schools is a sequel to Medieval Children , published in 2001. That book centres on children at home and how they grew up there . This one follows them to school . Not all of them , of course , because schools probably ...

Medieval Schools

A sequel to Nicholas Orme's widely praised study, Medieval Children Children have gone to school in England since Roman times. By the end of the middle ages there were hundreds of schools, supporting a highly literate society. This book traces their history from the Romans to the Renaissance, showing how they developed, what they taught, how they were run, and who attended them. Every kind of school is covered, from reading schools in churches and town grammar schools to schools in monasteries and nunneries, business schools, and theological schools. The author also shows how they fitted into a constantly changing world, ending with the impacts of the Renaissance and the Reformation. Medieval schools anticipated nearly all the ideas, practices, and institutions of schooling today. Their remarkable successes in linguistic and literary work, organizational development, teaching large numbers of people shaped the societies that they served. Only by understanding what schools achieved can we fathom the nature of the middle ages.

The Grammar Schools of Medieval England

“2 In his brief survey of the pre-Reformation period, Watson shares Leach's emphasis on the ecclesiastical domination of the nation's schools as the "central feature" of medieval times.6f* Moreover, he classifies the various kinds of ...

The Grammar Schools of Medieval England

The greatest single contribution to the history of the grammar schools of medieval England, including the famous public schools of Winchester and Eton, was made between 1890 and 1915 by Arthur Francis Leach (1851-1915). A graduate of Winchester and All Souls College, Oxford and a member of the Middle Temple, Leach was appointed under Prime Minister Gladstone to the Charity Commission where he was involved in the implementation of the Endowed Schools Act of 1869.

Schools and Schooling in Late Medieval Germany

Cathedral, collegiate, and city schools which left clearer footprints, were not, as a rule, open to girls. That many medieval schools excluded girls was less the result of medieval perceptions of the fitness of women for learning than ...

Schools and Schooling in Late Medieval Germany

Through a detailed reconstruction of schooling in late medieval Regensburg, this book provides fresh insights into the complex cultural, political, and institutional contexts in which the educational expansion of the late Middle Ages took place.

The Schools of Medieval England

... principles put into practice, we bring our survey of the Medieval Schools of England to an end. It may be interesting, in conclusion, to attempt some sort of statistical summary of school supply in England before the Reformation.

The Schools of Medieval England

Originally published 1915. This reprints the edition of 1969. When originally published this volume was the first history of English schools before the Reformation, reckoned from the accession of Edward VI.

The Schools of Medieval England

... principles put into practice, we bring our survey of the Medieval Schools of England to an end. It may be interesting, in conclusion, to attempt some sort of statistical summary of school supply in England before the Reformation.

The Schools of Medieval England


Crossing Boundaries at Medieval Universities

Arnau was by far the most prolific writer in the school's history, and the sheer quantity of his medical works makes it easy to think of him as a sport, as a kind of “world-historical” medical ... 54 Jacquart, La médecine médiévale, p.

Crossing Boundaries at Medieval Universities

This collaborative volume explores how the creation and the crossing of faculty, disciplinary and social boundaries contributed to the development of the medieval European university.

The Universities of Europe in the Middle Ages pt 2 English universities Student life

THE NUMBERS IN THE MEDIEVAL UNIVERSITIES . PAGE Testimony of Odofredus as to Bologna 581 Of Richard of Armagh , Wycliffe , and Gascoigne as to Oxford 581 Medieval exaggeration 582 More moderate statements as to Oxford 583 Degree ...

The Universities of Europe in the Middle Ages  pt  2  English universities  Student life


The Universities of Europe in the Middle Ages

The method of enquiry and of teaching of which he was the originator , was the method which essentially characterised the teaching of the medieval Universities - a method transferred by Abelard from Philosophy to Theology ...

The Universities of Europe in the Middle Ages


Universities and Schooling in Medieval Society

Since then there have been numerous studies on various national groups at medieval universities , on the effect of en - masse migrations , and on the exchange of students and masters between universities . Numerous Italians studied and ...

Universities and Schooling in Medieval Society

The 10 papers in this volume examine university and pre-university education in the 14th to 16th centuries in Germany, Italy, France, and England. Particular attention recruitment, financial support, studying abroad, social status, and careers of graduates.

The Cambridge Companion to Medieval English Culture

The Early Oxfiord Schools, The History of the University of Oxford: Vol. I (Oxford, 1984). Catto, J. I. and Ralph Evans (eds.) ... Mann, Jill, '“He Knew Nat Catoun': Medieval School-Texts and Middle English Literature,” in Jill ...

The Cambridge Companion to Medieval English Culture

"This "companion" is designed to introduce a range of materials deemed to constitute the culture (or, perhaps better, cultures) of medieval England, from approximately the Norman Conquest to roughly the Reformation. The fields presented here may offer a rather unusual fit with standard courses and disciplines, but the pressures on modern frameworks are intended. It is not unusual, however, for study of early periods to offer some combination of "literature," "history," "archaeology," "art history," or other field. Studies in antiquity and the Renaissance do this regularly; and medieval studies was from the outset defined in an equally capacious frame"--

The Universities of Europe in the Middle Ages English universities Student life

312 King's College (1441) . -315 Queens' College (1448) 320 S. Catharine's (1475) ...... 322 Jesus (1497) 323 CHAPTER XIII THE NUMBERS IN THE MEDIEVAL UNIVERSITIES Testimony of Odofredus as to Bologna . . . 325 Of Richard of Armagh, ...

The Universities of Europe in the Middle Ages  English universities  Student life


Gender and Emotions in Medieval and Early Modern Europe Destroying Order Structuring Disorder

The lives of the Sisters of Diepenveen and those of Deventer, both nunneries within the Devotio Moderna, show a similar pattern, but here nuns teaching their younger sisters seem to have been the rule, and schools as such are not ...

Gender and Emotions in Medieval and Early Modern Europe  Destroying Order  Structuring Disorder

States of emotion were vital as a foundation to society in the premodern period, employed as a force of order to structure diplomatic transactions, shape dynastic and familial relationships, and align religious beliefs, practices and communities. At the same time, societies understood that affective states had the potential to destroy order, creating undesirable disorder and instability that had both individual and communal consequences. These had to be actively managed, through social mechanisms such as children's education, acculturation, and training, and also through religious, intellectual, and textual practices that were both socio-cultural and individual. Presenting the latest research from an international team of scholars, this volume argues that the ways in which emotions created states of order and disorder in medieval and early modern Europe were deeply informed by contemporary gender ideologies. Together, the essays reveal the critical roles that gender ideologies and lived, structured, and desired emotional states played in producing both stability and instability.

Humanism and Scholasticism in Late Medieval Germany

Even a cursory survey of medieval university foundations reveals the close connection between politics and higher learning. Only the oldest and most venerable European universities—Bologna, Paris, Oxford, and Montpellier—grew ...

Humanism and Scholasticism in Late Medieval Germany

This analysis of the intellectual life of German universities in the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries demonstrates that humanist-scholastic relations were not the titanic struggles depicted in the humanists' own arguments or the many modern chronicles. Eschewing neat but misleading dichotomies, the author describes the German humanists' critique of scholasticism from the 1450s to the 1510s and the scholastics' response. He traces the reception of humanists in Germany's universities, including their place in the academic corporation, the "opposition" they faced, and the pace of humanist curriculum reforms, and he places the famous Reuchlin affair and other intellectual feuds in the context of humanist-scholastic relations. After 1500 the calls of the early humanists for the reform of Latin grammar instruction and the teaching of the studia humanitatis gave way to more encompassing attacks on scholastic theology and the philolsophical offerings of the arts course. The study draws on a wide variety of sources to describe both the gradual emergence of Renaissance humanism after 1450 and its rapid triumph after 1500. James H. Overfield is Associate Professor of History at the University of Vermont, Burlington. Originally published in 1985. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

The Experience of Beauty in the Middle Ages

Medieval school questions, like the proverbial 'How many angels can stand on the head ofa pin?' are in this same tradition. And it is not only a tradition in the schools but in medieval great households and courts as well, ...

The Experience of Beauty in the Middle Ages

This book articulates a new approach to medieval aesthetic values, emphasizing the sensory and emotional basis of all medieval arts, their love of play and fine craftsmanship, of puzzles, and of strong contrasts. Written for a general educated audience as well as students and scholars in the field, it offers an understanding of medieval literature and art that is rooted in the perceptions and feelings of ordinary life, made up of play and laughter as well as serious work. Medieval stylistic values of variety, sweetness, good taste, and ordinary beauty are grounded in classical and medieval biological theories of change and flux in the human body, not only in symbolism and theology. The book will appeal to all lovers of medieval arts, literature, architecture, music, and painting, as well as serious students of religion and the language of beauty.

Jewish Life in the Middle Ages

CHAPTER XIX THE MEDIEVAL SCHOOLS The Renaissance and the Jews . The Talmudical scheme of education . The education of girls . Learned women . Use of the vernacular in synagogue . Translations of the prayers . Ceremony of introducing the ...

Jewish Life in the Middle Ages


The Oxford Handbook of Medieval Literature in English

(1998), Collectanea pseudo-Bedae (Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, School of Celtic Studies). CARTLIDGE , NILE (ed.) ... (2006), ORME Medieval Schools: From Roman Britain to Renaissance England 316 daniel anlezark.

The Oxford Handbook of Medieval Literature in English

The study of medieval literature has experienced a revolution in the last two decades, which has reinvigorated many parts of the discipline and changed the shape of the subject in relation to the scholarship of the previous generation. 'New' texts (laws and penitentials, women's writing, drama records), innovative fields and objects of study (the history of the book, the study of space and the body, medieval masculinities), and original ways of studying them (the Sociology of the Text, performance studies) have emerged. This has brought fresh vigour and impetus to medieval studies, and impacted significantly on cognate periods and areas. The Oxford Handbook of Medieval Literature in English brings together the insights of these new fields and approaches with those of more familiar texts and methods of study, to provide a comprehensive overview of the state of medieval literature today. It also returns to first principles in posing fundamental questions about the nature, scope, and significance of the discipline, and the directions that it might take in the next decade. The Handbook contains 44 newly commissioned essays from both world-leading scholars and exciting new scholarly voices. Topics covered range from the canonical genres of Saints' lives, sermons, romance, lyric poetry, and heroic poetry; major themes including monstrosity and marginality, patronage and literary politics, manuscript studies and vernacularity are investigated; and there are close readings of key texts, such as Beowulf, Wulf and Eadwacer, and Ancrene Wisse and key authors from Ælfric to Geoffrey Chaucer, Langland, and the Gawain Poet.

History of Universities

Vivian Green, A History of Oxford University, (London, 1974), 25; Hastings Rashdall, in his classic work on medieval universities, discusses the riot briefly as one of several events that precipitated significant university migrations: ...

History of Universities

Volume XXI/1 of History of Universities contains the customary mix of learned articles, book reviews, conference reports, and bibliographical information, which makes this publication such an indispensable tool for the historian of higher education. Its contributions range widely geographically, chronologically, and in subject-matter. The volume is, as always, a lively combination of original research and invaluable reference material.

Samson and Delilah in Medieval Insular French

“December Liberties: Playing with the Roman Poets in the High-Medieval Schools”, Interfaces, 3 (2016): 90–108. Newman, Barbara. Medieval Crossover: Reading the Secular Against the Sacred (Conway Lectures in Medieval Studies.).

Samson and Delilah in Medieval Insular French

Samson and Delilah in Medieval Insular French investigates several different adaptations of the story of Samson that enabled it to move from a strictly religious sphere into vernacular and secular artworks. Catherine Léglu explores the narrative’s translation into French in medieval England, examining the multiple versions of the Samson narrative via its many adaptations into verse, prose, visual art and musical. Utilizing a multidisciplinary approach, this text draws together examples from several genres and media, focusing on the importance of book learning to secular works. In analysing this Biblical narrative, Léglu reveals the importance of the Samson and Delilah story as a point of entry into a fuller understanding of medieval translations and adaptations of the Bible.

Handbook of Medieval Culture

Drawn from the libraries of the medieval schools and colleges, monasteries, and especially the convents of the friars minor, texts continue to be systematically collected, edited, and catalogued in increasing numbers and studied by ...

Handbook of Medieval Culture

A follow-up publication to the Handbook of Medieval Studies, this new reference work turns to a different focus: medieval culture. Medieval research has grown tremendously in depth and breadth over the last decades. Particularly our understanding of medieval culture, of the basic living conditions, and the specific value system prevalent at that time has considerably expanded, to a point where we are in danger of no longer seeing the proverbial forest for the trees. The present, innovative handbook offers compact articles on essential topics, ideals, specific knowledge, and concepts defining the medieval world as comprehensively as possible. The topics covered in this new handbook pertain to issues such as love and marriage, belief in God, hell, and the devil, education, lordship and servitude, Christianity versus Judaism and Islam, health, medicine, the rural world, the rise of the urban class, travel, roads and bridges, entertainment, games, and sport activities, numbers, measuring, the education system, the papacy, saints, the senses, death, and money.

Priests of the Law

Orme, N, English Schools in the Middle Ages (Meuthen & Co 1973) Orme, N, Education in the West of England, 1066–1548 (Exeter University Press 1976) Orme, N, Medieval Schools: From Roman Britain to Renaissance England (Yale University ...

Priests of the Law

Priests of the Law tells the story of the first people in the history of the common law to think of themselves as legal professionals. In the middle decades of the thirteenth century, a group of justices working in the English royal courts spent a great deal of time thinking and writing about what it meant to be a person who worked in the law courts. This book examines the justices who wrote the treatise known as Bracton. Written and re-written between the 1220s and the 1260s, Bracton is considered one of the great treatises of the early common law and is still occasionally cited by judges and lawyers when they want to make the case that a particular rule goes back to the beginning of the common law. This book looks to Bracton less for what it can tell us about the law of the thirteenth century, however, than for what it can tell us about the judges who wrote it. The judges who wrote Bracton - Martin of Pattishall, William of Raleigh, and Henry of Bratton - were some of the first people to work full-time in England's royal courts, at a time when there was no recourse to an obvious model for the legal professional. They found one in an unexpected place: they sought to clothe themselves in the authority and prestige of the scholarly Roman-law tradition that was sweeping across Europe in the thirteenth century, modelling themselves on the jurists of Roman law who were teaching in European universities. In Bracton and other texts they produced, the justices of the royal courts worked hard to ensure that the nascent common-law tradition grew from Roman Law. Through their writing, this small group of people, working in the courts of an island realm, imagined themselves to be part of a broader European legal culture. They made the case that they were not merely servants of the king: they were priests of the law.