Memories of the Afterlife

Life Between Lives Stories of Personal Transformation

Memories of the Afterlife

Dr. Michael Newton, best-selling author of Journey of Souls and Destiny of Souls, returns with a series of case studies that highlight the profound impact of spiritual regression on people’s everyday lives. Edited by Dr. Newton, these fascinating true accounts from around the world are handpicked and presented by Life Between Lives hypnotherapists certified by the Newton Institute. After recalling memories of their afterlife, the people in these studies embarked on life-changing spiritual journeys—reuniting with soul mates and spirit guides, and discovering the ramifications of life and body choices, love relationships, and dreams by communing with their immortal souls. As gems of self-knowledge are revealed, dramatic epiphanies result, enabling these ordinary people to understand adversity in their lives, find emotional healing, realize their true purpose, and forever enrich their lives with new meaning.

Blueprints of the Afterlife

Blueprints of the Afterlife

In a future world that has been decimated by a sentient glacier and corrupt nanotechnology, a film archivist, a former mercenary and a virtuoso dishwasher are manipulated by a man who is overseeing the construction of a Manhattan replica in Puget Sound. By the author of Misconception. Original.

Memories of Class (Routledge Revivals)

The Pre-history and After-life of Class

Memories of Class (Routledge Revivals)

First published in 1982, Professor Bauman’s discussion of the mechanism of class formation and institutionalisation of class conflict argues that our understanding of changes in social and political structure has been hindered by the freezing of concepts of class in the ice-age of industrial society. He investigates the impact of historical memory on the early transformation of rank into a class society, and on the current confusion in the analysis of the ‘crisis of late-industrial society’. The book traces the formation of a class society back to the patterns of ‘surveillance power’ and control, and shows how these patterns preceded and made possible the industrial system. Subsequently ‘economised’ into the industrial system, these same patterns of control have now proved to be inadequate under social conditions brought about by this economisation of the power conflict.

The Afterlife of Austria-Hungary

The Image of the Habsburg Monarchy in Interwar Europe

The Afterlife of Austria-Hungary

The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in 1914 was just one link in a chain of events leading to World War I and the downfall of the Austro-Hungarian empire. By 1918, after nearly four hundred years of rule, the Habsburg monarchy was expunged in an instant of history. Remarkably, despite tales of decadence, ethnic indifference, and a failure to modernize, the empire enjoyed a renewed popularity in interwar narratives. Today, it remains a crucial point of reference for Central European identity, evoking nostalgia among the nations that once dismembered it. The Afterlife of Austria-Hungary examines histories, journalism, and literature in the period between world wars to expose both the positive and the negative treatment of the Habsburg monarchy following its dissolution and the powerful influence of fiction and memory over history. Originally published in Polish, Adam Kozuchowski’s study analyzes the myriad factors that contributed to this phenomenon. Chief among these were economic depression, widespread authoritarianism on the continent, and the painful rise of aggressive nationalism. Many authors of these narratives were well-known intellectuals who yearned for the high culture and peaceable kingdom of their personal memory. Kozuchowski contrasts these imaginaries with the causal realities of the empire’s failure. He considers the aspirations of Czechs, Poles, Romanians, Hungarians, and Austrians, and their quest for autonomy or domination over their neighbors, coupled with the wave of nationalism spreading across Europe. Kozuchowski then dissects the reign of the legendary Habsburg monarch, Franz Joseph, and the lasting perceptions that he inspired. To Kozuchowski, the interwar discourse was a reaction to the monumental change wrought by the dissolution of Austria-Hungary and the fear of a history lost. Those displaced at the empire’s end attempted, through collective (and selective) memory, to reconstruct the vision of a once great multinational power. It was an imaginary that would influence future histories of the empire and even became a model for the European Union.

The Afterlife of AmericaÕs War in Vietnam

Changing Visions in Politics and on Screen

The Afterlife of AmericaÕs War in Vietnam

The fall of Saigon in 1975 signaled the end of America’s longest war. Yet in many ways the conflict was far from over. Although the actual fighting ended, the struggle to find political justification and historical vindication for the Vietnam War still lingered in American consciousness. A plethora of images from America’s first “televised war” has kept the conflict all too fresh in the memories of those who lived through it, while creating a confusing picture for a younger generation. The political process of attaching meaning to historical events has ultimately failed due to the lack of consensus—then and now—regarding events surrounding the Vietnam War. Reviewing the record of American politics, film, and television, this volume provides a brief overview of the war’s appearance in American popular culture. It examines the ways in which this conflict has consistently resurfaced in social and political life, especially in the arena of contemporary world events such as the Soviet incursion into Afghanistan, the Gulf War and the 2004 presidential campaign. To this end, the work explores the contexts and uses of the Vietnam War as a recurring subject. The circumstances and symbolism used in the rhetoric of the political elite and the news media, including the New York Times, the Washington Post, Time, and Newsweek, are discussed. Emphasis is also placed on the role of film and television as the book examines movies such as The Deer Hunter and Apocalypse Now and TV series such as M*A*S*H. In weaving together the political and screen appearances of the Vietnam War, the book reexamines the influence of a major episode in American history.

Ghosts of Home

The Afterlife of Czernowitz in Jewish Memory

Ghosts of Home

In modern-day Ukraine, east of the Carpathian Mountains, there is an invisible city. Known as Czernowitz, the "Vienna of the East" under the Habsburg empire, this vibrant Jewish-German Eastern European culture vanished after World War II—yet an idealized version lives on, suspended in the memories of its dispersed people and passed down to their children like a precious and haunted heirloom. In this original blend of history and communal memoir, Marianne Hirsch and Leo Spitzer chronicle the city's survival in personal, familial, and cultural memory. They find evidence of a cosmopolitan culture of nostalgic lore—but also of oppression, shattered promises, and shadows of the Holocaust in Romania. Hirsch and Spitzer present the first historical account of Jewish Czernowitz in the English language and offer a profound analysis of memory's echo across generations.

Memories of the Maghreb

Transnational Identities in Spanish Cultural Production

Memories of the Maghreb

Using a cultural studies approach, this book explores how the Spanish colonization of North Africa continues to haunt Spain's efforts to articulate a national identity that can accommodate both the country's diversity, brought about by immigration from its old colonies, and the postnational demands of its integration in the European Union.

The Afterlife of Genre

Remnants of the Trauerspiel in Buffy the Vampire Slayer

The Afterlife of Genre

Could there have been television without California? California without television? The one shows the other: the ostentatiously novel singularity of the place and the seemingly self-effacing transparency of the medium. Yet if television and California both promise again and again to offer us something new, young, immaculate in its transience - a pure surface that will never get caught in the ditch of time - they are also both haunted through and through: by the itinerant contents of the past that they cannot banish, by memories of the infantile-perverse utopian fantasies that taunt us in constant replay ("If you're going to San Francisco...," "two girls for every guy"), by the contradiction played out in the very gesture of dismissing history and leaving the dead to bury the dead. California and television, as it were, conspire in a vampirologic: the forever-young is what has been there the longest, what really "takes us back." And so we also will take ourselves back: to Buffy the Vampire Slayer, already almost charmingly quaint, and Walter Benjamin's magnum opus The Origin of the German Mourning-Play. What can come of this improbable conjunction? It will not seem too strange that Benjamin, posthumous wanderer across the textures of Americana, should again take up lodging at the Hotel California. But more is at stake than just another hapless visitation from the on high of high theory: reading Buffy as the remediated afterlife of the dead-on-arrival genre of the baroque German mourning play, Adler's book records the first broken, awkward steps toward a project that, with the recent rise of "quality television," seems more urgent than ever before: a political-theological characteristic of the television series.

Children and the Afterlife of State Violence

Memories of Dictatorship

Children and the Afterlife of State Violence

This book examines memories of political violence in Chile after the 1973 coup and a 17-years-long dictatorship. Based on individual and group interviews, it focuses on the second generation children, adults today, born to parents who were opponents of Pinochet ́s regime. Focusing on their lived experience, the intersection between private and public realms during Pinochet’s politics of fear regime, and the afterlife of violence in the post-dictatorship, the book is concerned with new dilemmas and perspectives that stem from the intergenerational transmission of political memories. It reflects critically on the role of family memories in the broader field of memory in Chile, demonstrating the dynamics of how later generations appropriate and inhabit their family political legacies. The book suggests how the second generation cultural memory redefines the concept of victimhood and propels society into a broader process of recognition.

The Afterlife of Billy Fingers

How My Bad-Boy Brother Proved to Me There's Life After Death

The Afterlife of Billy Fingers

Suffering from world-weariness, former singer/songwriter Annie Kagan gave up her life in New York City and moved to a small house by the bay. While trying to figure out what to do with her life, her brother Billy died unexpectedly. A few weeks after his death, Billy woke his sister at dawn. "It’s Billy, darling! I’m drifting weightlessly through gorgeous galaxies and I feel a loving, beneficent presence twinkling all around me.” Was Billy real or just a figment of her imagination? In The Afterlife of Billy Fingers, Kagan shares her unprecedented journey into the mysteries of the afterlife. Billy’s ongoing account of his celestial experiences is filled with transcendent wisdom, irreverent humor, and hope. The Afterlife of Billy Fingers will change the way you think about life, death, and the Universe. Another time, Billy says, “If I could give you a gift it would be to find the glory inside yourself, beyond the roles and the drama, so you can dance the dance of the game with a little more rhythm, a little more abandon, a little more shaking those hips.” In his foreword, Dr. Raymond Moody, author of Life after Life, explains the phenomena of walkers between the worlds, known to us since ancient times, but still surprising to way too many of us.