Merry mount

Nay more , thou shalt have a pledge of this promise . Mark me , ere three days are flown , shalt thou find around thy neck , something which is very dear to thy heart . " , “ What mean you by this riddle ? ” 156 MERRY - MOUNT .

Merry mount


Nathaniel Hawthorne

“The Maypole of Merry Mount,” Hawthorne's tale of a clash between Puritan and Heathen values in New England, opens with a description of the days at Merry Mount, “when the May-Pole was the banner-staff of that gay colony!

Nathaniel Hawthorne

Presents a brief biography of Nathaniel Hawthorne, thematic and structural analysis of his works, critical views, and an index of themes and ideas.

The Cambridge Introduction to Nathaniel Hawthorne

Hawthorne did include “The May-Pole of Merry Mount” in the 1837 edition of Twice-Told Tales and another, related tale of the Puritans, “Endicott and the Red Cross,” in the expanded edition of Twice-Told Tales he published in 1842.

The Cambridge Introduction to Nathaniel Hawthorne

As the author of The Scarlet Letter, Nathaniel Hawthorne has been established as a major writer of the nineteenth century and the most prominent chronicler of New England and its colonial history. This introductory book for students coming to Hawthorne for the first time outlines his life and writings in a clear and accessible style. Leland S. Person also explains some of the significant cultural and social movements that influenced Hawthorne's most important writings: Puritanism, Transcendentalism and Feminism. The major works, including The Scarlet Letter, The House of the Seven Gables and The Blithedale Romance, as well as Hawthorne's important short stories and non-fiction, are analysed in detail. The book also includes a brief history and survey of Hawthorne scholarship, with special emphasis on recent studies. Students of nineteenth-century American literature will find this a rewarding and engaging introduction to this remarkable writer.

Young Goodman Brown and Other Tales

THE MAYPOLE OF MERRY MOUNT There is an admirable foundation for a philosophic romance , in the curious history of the early settlement of Mount Wollaston , * or Merry Mount . In the slight sketch here attempted , the facts recorded on ...

Young Goodman Brown and Other Tales

Gathers twenty of Hawthorne's tales of Puritan New England dealing with superstition, guilt, moral pride, and the supernatural

The American Historical Romance

One of the finest fruits of this maturation , and one that from our vantage point promises still finer to come , is “ The May - Pole of Merry Mount . The prefatory note to “ The May - Pole of Merry Mount ” stands in relation to the tale ...

The American Historical Romance

This book traces the tradition of American historical fiction from its origins in the early nineteenth century to the eve of World War II. It examines the historical novel's connections with Enlightenment and Romantic theories of history; with the rise of literary regionalism; with the ambitions of Romantic writers to revive the epic and romance; with changing conceptions of gender roles; and with the authors' troubled responses to the great revolutionary and imperialistic conflicts of the modern era. However, though inevitably much concerned with the theory of genre and with the specific contents of the genre of historical romance, Professor Dekker devotes most of his book to new readings of major texts by James Fenimore Cooper, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Mark Twain, Allen Tate, Edith Wharton, Willa Cather, and William Faulkner, as well as to the Briton whose name was synonymous with the genre for most of the nineteenth century - Sir Walter Scott. 'The American Historical Romance is the richest, most fully meditated and most rewarding yet written by this author ... It is the most important book on the relations of British and American fiction to come out for many years. No devotee of the American novel will ignore it.' -- The Times Literary Supplement.

American Opera

26 Merry Mount and Emperor Jones After the extraordinary success of the Deems Taylor operas , Gatti - Casazza turned to two other highly esteemed American composers , Howard Hanson and Louis Gruenberg , whose operas were to serve as the ...

American Opera

Tired of Tannhuser? Bored with Bohme? Then open your imagination to the unexpected pleasures of American opera.With this generous, accessible overview, Elise K. Kirk provides a lively history of one of America's liveliest arts. A treasure trove of information on a substantial, heretofore neglected repertoire, American Opera sketches musical traits and provides plot summaries, descriptions of sets and stagings, and biographical details on performers, composers, and librettists for more than 100 American operas, many of which have received unjustifiably scant attention since their premieres. From the spectacle and melodrama of William Dunlap's Pizarro in Peru (1800) and the pathos of Caryl Florio's Uncle Tom's Cabin (1882) to the chilling psychological drama of Jack Beeson's Lizzie Borden (1965) and the lyric elegance of John Corigliano's The Ghosts of Versailles (1991), opera in America displays the energy and diversity of the nation itself. Kirk shows that this rich, varied repertoire includes far more than familiar jewels such as Porgy and Bess, Candide, Susannah, and The Consul. Beginning with the English-influenced harlequinade of the revolutionary period, Kirk traces the development of comic opera, the rise of melodramatic romanticism, the emergence of American grand opera and verismo, and the explosion of eclectic forms that characterized American opera in the twentieth century. Devoting particular attention to the accomplishments of women and black composers and librettists, Kirk explores how American operas have incorporated indigenous elements such as jazz, popular song, folk music, Native American motifs, and Hollywood's cinematic techniques. She also discusses the impact of radio and television broadcasting on opera in America, the advent of opera workshops in universities, the integration of multimedia effects into recent opera productions, and innovations such as co-commissioning and joint staging that have helped sustain American opera as federal support has declined.An engaging introduction for neophytes, American Opera also offers an array of welcome surprises for diehard opera fans.

Metafiction and Myth in the Novels of Peter Ackroyd

nalist , ” who records the history of the “ gay colony ” of Mount Wollaston or Merry Mount , the site of an early trading company near Plymouth , Massachussetts . The narrator - annalist explains how , in those days : “ Jollity and ...

Metafiction and Myth in the Novels of Peter Ackroyd

Providing detailed analysis of the recurrent structural and thematic traits in Peter Ackroyd's first nine novels, this work sets out to show how they grow out of the tension created by two apparently contradictory tendencies. These are, on the one hand, the metafictional tendency to blur the boundaries between story-telling and history, to enhance the linguistic component of writing, and to underline the constructedness of the world created in a way that aligns Ackroyd with other postmodernist writers of historiographic metafiction; and on the other, the attempt to achieve mythical closure, expressed, for example, in Ackroyd's fictional treatment of London as a mystic centre of power. This mythical element evinces the influence of high modernists such as Ezra Pound and T.S. Eliot, and links Ackroyd's work to transition-to-postmodern writers such as Lawrence Durrell, Maureen Duffy, Doris Lessing and John Fowles.

Howard Hanson in Theory and Practice

Merry Mount , with a libretto by Richard L. Stokes , was based loosely upon Nathaniel Hawthorne's short story “ The Maypole of Merry Mount , " and thus had not only an American composer and librettist but an American source and an ...

Howard Hanson in Theory and Practice

Examines the relationship between theory and the employment of that theory in the works of Howard Hanson, prominent twentieth-century composer, conductor, educator, and champion of American music.

The Wedding Complex

Mount ' : Thomas Morton and the Puritan Patriarchs , ” Massachusetts Review 21 ( 1980 ) : 382-410 ; John P. McWilliams Jr. , “ Fictions of Merry Mount , " American Quarterly 29 ( 1977 ) : 3-30 ; G. Harrison Orians , “ Hawthorne and ...

The Wedding Complex

DIVA queer literary and cultural studies examination of the wedding ceremony (rather than the resulting marriages) which finds it to be a space of more open possibilities than might normally be supposed./div

The Secret Turning of the Earth

MERRY MOUNT On May Day , 1627 , they flaunted their freedom in the sight of solemn Puritanism by setting up the far - famed May - pole . Hilariously these unleashed pagans danced about the " idoll " of Merry - Mount , joining hands with ...

The Secret Turning of the Earth

This book of strong, ambitious poems are mapped out by what the author calls the geometries of seeing. The author wrote his first poem at the age of 45.

Hawthorne Melville and the American Character

227 . 44 Quoted in Randall Stewart , “ Hawthorne's Contributions to The Salem Advertiser , ” American Literature , 5 ( 1934 ) , pp . 331 , 332 . 45 Hawthorne , " The May - pole of Merry Mount , " in Twice - Told Tales , ed .

Hawthorne Melville and the American Character

This book considers the portrayal of the American national character in the writings of Nathaniel Hawthorne and Herman Melville. It examines Hawthorne's abiding concern with the development of New England from colony to province to republic, and analyses Melville's changing evocation of 'the new American', and the difficulties he faced in sustaining his heady nationalistic faith.

In the American Grain

This parochialism is helped by such balanced statement as A. C. Adams ' preface to Thomas Morton's The New English Canaan - in which the incident of the May - pole at Merry Mount is related . Adams has compared that “ vulgar royalist ...

In the American Grain

William Carlos Williams's examination of American history in a series of reflective essays.

Bloom s How to Write about Nathaniel Hawthorne

What does that contrast imply about the inhabitants of Merry Mount? This sentence continues to describe the perpetual May of Merry Mount. May was “sporting with the Summer months, and revelling with Autumn, and basking in the glow of ...

Bloom s How to Write about Nathaniel Hawthorne

Bloom's How to Write About Nathaniel Hawthorne offers valuable paper-topic suggestions, clearly outlined strategies on how to write a strong essay, and an insightful introduction by Harold Bloom designed to help students develop their analytical writing skills and critical comprehension of this important writer and his works.

Thematic Guide to Popular Short Stories

The May - Pole of Merry Mount " ( 1836 ) . From Selected Tales and Sketches ( Ed . Michael J. Colacurcio , 1987 ) . ALLEGORY / LEGEND / FABLE ; ASSIMILATION ; GOOD / EVIL ; LOVE ; MARRIAGE ; MEN and WOMEN ; NATURE / WILDERNESS ...

Thematic Guide to Popular Short Stories

A guide for librarians and teachers offers annotations summarizing the themes, plots, and publication information for 450 popular short stories.

Somewhat on the Community System

the banner-staff of Merry Mount be fortunate, sunshine would break upon the hills, and flowers would beautify the forest, and late posterity do homage to the May-Pole! (CE 9:62) The puritanism that, as Colacurcio puts it in The Province ...

Somewhat on the Community System

Hawthorne wrote much of his major fiction in the decade that the theories of Charles Marie François Fourier crossed the Atlantic and contributed to a wave of communitarian experimentation in the American North. Famously, Hawthorne briefly lived and worked at Brook Farm, a Transcendentalist commune that formally converted to Fourierism when he had left and was embroiled in litigation to recover money he had invested in the community. In his fiction, Hawthorne responded directly to Fourierism and its critique of capitalism. He used his experiences at Brook Farm as the inspiration for The Blithedale Romance, and in The House of the Seven Gables cast one of the principal characters as a recovering Fourierist. In The Scarlet Letter he engaged with Fourierist debates on marriage and the regulation of desire. Somewhat on the Community-System examines these interventions, and argues that Hawthorne's fiction both seeks to contain Fourierism and responds to its allure. Moreover, in formulating alternative, morally acceptable utopias (ones that are predicated on middle-class marriage), Hawthorne's fiction appropriates key aspects of Fourierist theory

My Words Echo Thus

Such censoriousness was bound to clash with the laxity of the Catholics at Mary Mount , and Ackroyd borrows from Hawthorne's " The May - Pole of Merry Mount " ( 1836 ) to sketch the antagonism between the two communities .

My Words Echo Thus

A reading of Ackroyd that maps the influence of his historical and fiction writings on one another

Temple Bar

MERRY MOUNT . I'm the lord of Merry Mount . Merry Mount is fair and stable , With its weathercocks ashine Twinkling in a golden line , With its terrace and its fount , With its oriel and its gable : Proud am I of Merry Mount !

Temple Bar


In Search of the Utopian States of America

Blithedalers and Merry Mounters are described almost identically. In the short story on Merry Mount, time does not pass adhering to the change of seasons, as “May, or her mirthful spirit, dwelt all the year round at Merry Mount” (1832, ...

In Search of the Utopian States of America

This book endeavours to understand the seemingly direct link between utopianism and the USA, discussing novels that have never been brought together in this combination before, even though they all revolve around intentional communities: Imlay’s The Emigrants (1793), Hawthorne’s The Blithedale Romance (1852), Howland’s Papas Own Girl (1874), Griggs’s Imperium in Imperio (1899), and Du Bois’s The Quest of the Silver Fleece (1911). They relate nation and utopia not by describing perfect societies, but by writing about attempts to immediately live radically different lives. Signposting the respective communal history, the readings provide a literary perspective to communal studies, and add to a deeply necessary historicization for strictly literary approaches to US utopianism, and for studies that focus on Pilgrims/Puritans/Founding Fathers as utopian practitioners. This book therefore highlights how the authors evaluated the USA’s utopian potential and traces the nineteenth-century development of the utopian imagination from various perspectives.

American Enchantment

Nathaniel Hawthorne, “The Maypole of Merry Mount,” in The Celestial Railroad and Other Stories (New York: Signet, 1963), 115–116. 2. See John Demos, Entertaining Satan: Witchcraft and the Culture of Early New England (New York: Oxford ...

American Enchantment

The demise of the monarchy and the bodily absence of a King caused a representational crisis in the early republic, forcing the American people to reconstruct the social symbolic order in a new and unfamiliar way. Social historians have routinely understood the Revolution and the earlyrepublic as projects dedicated to and productive of reason, with "the people" as an orderly and sensible collective at odds with the volatile and unthinking crowd. American Enchantment rejects this traditionally held vision of a rational public sphere, arguing that early Americans dealt with thepost-monarchical crisis by engaging in "civil mysticism," not systematic discussion and debate. By evaluating a wide range of social and political rituals and literary and cultural discourses, Sizemore shows how "enchantment" becomes a vital mode of enacting the people after the demise of traditional monarchical forms. In works by Charles Brockden Brown, Washington Irving, Catharine Sedgwick,and Nathaniel Hawthorne - as well as in Delaware oral histories, accounts of George Washington's inauguration, and Methodist conversion narratives - enchantment is an experience uniquely capable of producing new forms of popular power and social affiliation. Recognizing the role of enchantment inconstituting the people overturns some of the most common-sense assumptions in the post-revolutionary world: above all, that the people are not simply a flesh-and-blood substance, but also a mystical force.