Metaphors of Spain

Metaphors of Spain brings together leading historians to examine Spanish nationalism through its diverse and complementary cultural artifacts, from “formal” representations such as the flag to music, bullfighting, and other more diffuse ...

Metaphors of Spain

The history of twentieth-century Spanish nationalism is a complex one, placing a set of famously distinctive regional identities against a backdrop of religious conflict, separatist tensions, and the autocratic rule of Francisco Franco. And despite the undeniably political character of that story, cultural history can also provide essential insights into the subject. Metaphors of Spain brings together leading historians to examine Spanish nationalism through its diverse and complementary cultural artifacts, from “formal” representations such as the flag to music, bullfighting, and other more diffuse examples. Together they describe not a Spanish national “essence,” but a nationalism that is constantly evolving and accommodates multiple interpretations.

Metaphors of Masculinity

In this study of projective behavior as found in the folklore of an Andalusian town, Stanley Brandes is careful to support psychological interpretations with ethnographic evidence.

Metaphors of Masculinity

In the Andalusian communities throughout the olive-growing region of southeastern Spain men show themselves to be primarily concerned with two problems of identity: their place in the social hierarchy, and the maintenance of their masculinity in the context of their culture. In this study of projective behavior as found in the folklore of an Andalusian town, Stanley Brandes is careful to support psychological interpretations with ethnographic evidence. His emphasis on male folklore provides a timely complement to current research on women.

Metaphors of Conversion in Seventeenth century Spanish Drama

A new examination of the important theme of conversion in seventeenth-century Spanish drama.

Metaphors of Conversion in Seventeenth century Spanish Drama

A new examination of the important theme of conversion in seventeenth-century Spanish drama.

Mapping Metaphors

Mapping Metaphors


The Translation of Original Metaphors from Spanish to English in Two Novels by Carmen Laforet

Original metaphors from the text are compared to four published English translations by Inez Muñoz (1958), Charles Franklin Payne (1964), Glafyra Ennis (1993) and Edith Grossman (2007) in a corpus based study.

The Translation of Original Metaphors from Spanish to English in Two Novels by Carmen Laforet

"This thesis is about 'new' metaphor, conceived and created by authors, often called 'original metaphor' in the world of Translation Studies. It is the most extreme form of figurative language, 'often dramatic and shocking in effect' Newmark (1982, p.84). The translation of original metaphor can produce unexpected juxtapositions of language, suggesting as many different results as there are translators, Nevertheless, many theorists (e.g. Reiss, 1971; Newmark, 1988; Ribé, 1997) say this type of metaphor should be translated 'literally', or word for word as far as possible, suggesting there might be uniformity between translators' solutions. This study investigates how literary translators approach this challenge, focusing on Spanish-English translations of a novel containing plenty of original metaphors: Nada (1945), by Spanish author Carmen Laforet (1921-2004). Original metaphors from the text are compared to four published English translations by Inez Muñoz (1958), Charles Franklin Payne (1964), Glafyra Ennis (1993) and Edith Grossman (2007) in a corpus based study. It shows that they use a variety of methods to translate the metaphors, but translate 'literally' in well over half of them. In a two-part translation exercise and questionnaire, professional literary translators are asked to translate some of these metaphors. Again, many different strategies are employed, but over half of them are translated as literally as possible within the confines of English grammar and syntax. Although this investigation is limited to one author and language pair, it gives a clear indication that although literary translators vary exceedingly in their solutions, on the whole they prefer to translate original metaphors as literally as possible. Given that the essence of original metaphor is that it reflects the author's personality, this demonstrates literary translators' seeming desire to reproduce an author's distinctive character as exactly as possible for their readers. The finding is applied to a new English translation of the first part of La isla y los demonios, Laforet's second novel, which forms the practice part of this PhD. A literal strategy has been used to translate the original metaphors in the text, some of which have then been reviewed by an experienced editor of literary texts in English for a further insight into their acceptability." -- Abstract.

Applied Cognitive Linguistics Language pedagogy

Foreword This paper is a sort of bridgehead on the complex topic of the contrastive analysis of the lexis and grammar of basic metaphors in English and Spanish . I lead a research team at the University of Murcia in Spain ( some of its ...

Applied Cognitive Linguistics  Language pedagogy

As a usage-based language theory, cognitive linguistics is predestined to have an impact on applied research in such areas as language in society, ideology, language acquisition, language pedagogy. The present volumes are a first systematic attempt to carve out pathways from the links between language and cognition to the fields of language acquisition and language pedagogy and to deal with them in one coherent framework: applied cognitive linguistics.

Metaphors of Cancer in Scientific Popularisation Articles in the English and Spanish Press

This thesis provides an account of the metaphors of cancer in a comparable English and Spanish corpus of 300 press popularisation articles.

Metaphors of Cancer in Scientific Popularisation Articles in the English and Spanish Press

This thesis provides an account of the metaphors of cancer in a comparable English and Spanish corpus of 300 press popularisation articles. The aim is to identify relevant source domains that are employed in these articles to conceptualise the disease. Although a number of studies have explored the use of WAR metaphors in the discourse on cancer, there is still little understanding of the actual way cancer is presented metaphorically to the lay public in the press or of the range of source domains that conceptualise the target domain. Thus, in addition to the WAR, VIOLENCE AND AGGRESSION source domain, this study focuses on other metaphorical systems exploited to elucidate such aspects as metastasis, apoptosis, cancer treatments and cancer research. A text analysis was carried out with the aid of a corpus software program. The metaphors in the two subcorpora were compared quantitatively and qualitatively for cross-cultural differences in terms of their functions and patterning. Although cancer knowledge is popularised through similar metaphorical expressions, subtle differences have been identified in terms of metaphor density, choice of metaphor and the functions performed by these expressions.

The Oxford Handbook of Spanish Politics

The language(s) of the Spanish nation. In Metaphors of Spain. Representations of Spanish National Identity in the Twentieth Century. New York. Oxford: Berghahn Books, pp. 142–16O. Orriols, L. and T. Rodon. 2016.

The Oxford Handbook of Spanish Politics

The Oxford Handbook of Spanish Politics provides a comprehensive and comparative overview of the Spanish political system through the lens of political science. It aims to move away from a complacent analysis of Spanish democracy and provide a nuanced view of some of its strengths and challenges. The Handbook introduces Spanish politics to an international audience of scholars and practitioners. It is structured around six sections that cover Spain's political history, institutional changes, elections, civil society, policy-making, and foreign affairs. The volume brings together a distinguished group of 47 internationally renowned scholars who study Spain in its own right, or as a case among others in a comparative perspective. The contributors provide expert accounts of contemporary Spain, making the Oxford Handbook of Spanish Politics an invaluable resource for anyone interested in Spanish politics and government since the country's transition to democracy.

The Media Student s Book

It also offers a metaphor about 'believing' in the past and coming to terms with what it means, represented here by ... Both these films are metaphors about Spain under Franco and feature children (played by child star Ana Torrent) who ...

The Media Student s Book

The Media Student's Book is a comprehensive introduction for students of media studies. It covers all the key topics and provides a detailed, lively and accessible guide to concepts and debates. Now in its fifth edition, this bestselling textbook has been thoroughly revised, re-ordered and updated, with many very recent examples and expanded coverage of the most important issues currently facing media studies. It is structured in three main parts, addressing key concepts, debates, and research skills, methods and resources. Individual chapters include: approaching media texts narrative genres and other classifications representations globalisation ideologies and discourses the business of media new media in a new world? the future of television regulation now debating advertising, branding and celebrity news and its futures documentary and ‘reality’ debates from ‘audience’ to ‘users’ research: skills and methods. Each chapter includes a range of examples to work with, sometimes as short case studies. They are also supported by separate, longer case studies which include: Slumdog Millionaire online access for film and music CSI and detective fictions Let the Right One In and The Orphanage PBS, BBC and HBO images of migration The Age of Stupid and climate change politics. The authors are experienced in writing, researching and teaching across different levels of undergraduate study, with an awareness of the needs of students. The book is specially designed to be easy and stimulating to use, with: a Companion Website with popular chapters from previous editions, extra case studies and further resources for teaching and learning, at: www.mediastudentsbook.com margin terms, definitions, photos, references (and even jokes), allied to a comprehensive glossary follow-up activities in ‘Explore’ boxes suggestions for further reading and online research references and examples from a rich range of media and media forms, including advertising, cinema, games, the internet, magazines, newspapers, photography, radio, and television.

Metaphor and Intercultural Communication

Metaphor and Intercultural Communication examines in detail the dynamics of metaphor in interlingual contact, translation and globalization processes.

Metaphor and Intercultural Communication

Metaphor and Intercultural Communication examines in detail the dynamics of metaphor in interlingual contact, translation and globalization processes. Its case-studies, which combine methods of cognitive metaphor theory with those of corpus-based and discourse-oriented research, cover contact linguistic and cultural contacts between Chinese, English including Translational English and Aboriginal English, Greek, Kabyle, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, and Spanish. Part I introduces readers to practical and methodological problems of the intercultural transfer of metaphor through empirical (corpus-based and experimental) studies of translators' experiences and strategies in dealing with figurative language in a variety of contexts. Part II explores the universality-relativity dimension of cross- and intercultural metaphor on the basis of empirical data from various European and non-European cultures. Part III investigates the socio-economic and political consequences of figurative language use through case studies of communication between aboriginal and mainstream cultures, in the media, in political discourse and gender-related discourses. Special attention is paid to cases of miscommunication and of deliberate re- and counter-conceptualisation of clichés from one culture into another. The results open new perspectives on some of the basic assumptions of the 'classic' cognitive paradigm, e.g. regarding metaphor understanding, linguistic relativity and concept-construction.

The Musical Iconography of Power in Seventeenth Century Spain and Her Territories

From the 1530s, musical metaphors of the state and the prince acquired a visual representation with the emergence of emblem ... The study of the musical metaphors of the polity in Spain (best exemplified in Amphion's lyre) offers a ...

The Musical Iconography of Power in Seventeenth Century Spain and Her Territories

As Spain encountered economic and political crises in the seventeenth century, the imagery of musical performance was invoked by the state to represent the power of the monarch and to denote harmony throughout the kingdom. Based on contemporary sources, Gonzalez is able to unravel the complex iconography of Spanish politics.

Bucolic Metaphors

Bucolic Metaphors


Politics Gender and Conceptual Metaphors

Now in paperback, this wide-ranging collection of language-based studies will interest students and researchers in discourse analysis, political communication, gender studies, journalism, and media studies.

Politics  Gender and Conceptual Metaphors

Distinguished researchers from around the world examine the interplay between gender and metaphor in political language in Great Britain, the United States, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Ireland, and Singapore. They draw on a wide variety of corpus data to determine to what extent metaphors used by women in political power differ with, or remain the same as that of men. They also examine what effect metaphor use has on women's power in the political arena. This wide-ranging collection of language-based studies will interest students and researchers in discourse analysis, political communication, gender studies, journalism, and media studies.

Metaphor in Language and Culture across World Englishes

Doniger, W. (2009), The Hindus: An Alternative History, London: Penguin Press. Esmeralda, T. (2014), 'A Critical Study of the Women are Animals Conceptual Metaphor', Conference Paper, Spain: University of Murcia.

Metaphor in Language and Culture across World Englishes

This book advances and broadens the scope of research on conceptual metaphor at the nexus of language and culture by exploring metaphor and figurative language as a characteristic of the many Englishes that have developed in a wide range of geographic, socio-historical and cultural settings around the world. In line with the interdisciplinary breadth of this endeavour, the contributions are grounded in Cognitive (Socio)Linguistics, Conceptual Metaphor Theory, and Cultural Linguistics. Drawing on different research methodologies, including corpus linguistics, elicitation techniques, and interviews, chapters analyse a variety of naturalistic data and text types, such as online language, narratives, political speeches and literary works. Examining both the cultural conceptualisations underlying the use of figurative language and the linguistic-cultural specificity of metaphor and its variation, the studies are presented in contexts of both language contact and second language usage. Adding to the debate on the interplay of universal and culture-specific grounding of conceptual metaphor, Metaphor in Language and Culture across World Englishes advances research in a previously neglected sphere of study in the field of World Englishes.

Metaphor Wars

Embodied metaphor in Tunisian Arabic anger expressions.93 Metaphorical scenarios in public discourse.94 Horse metaphors in Spanish and English.95 Conceptual metaphors in Darwin's theory of evolution.96 Political debates about the ...

Metaphor Wars

The study of metaphor is now firmly established as a central topic within cognitive science and the humanities. We marvel at the creative dexterity of gifted speakers and writers for their special talents in both thinking about certain ideas in new ways, and communicating these thoughts in vivid, poetic forms. Yet metaphors may not only be special communicative devices, but a fundamental part of everyday cognition in the form of 'conceptual metaphors'. An enormous body of empirical evidence from cognitive linguistics and related disciplines has emerged detailing how conceptual metaphors underlie significant aspects of language, thought, cultural and expressive action. Despite its influence and popularity, there have been major criticisms of conceptual metaphor. This book offers an evaluation of the arguments and empirical evidence for and against conceptual metaphors, much of which scholars on both sides of the wars fail to properly acknowledge.

Clio s Laws

An example, from an excellent book, of course, but one whose author constructs metaphor on top of metaphor (Ann Laura ... 1 What these metaphors represented was a mix of realities and intentions: Spain's imperial and economic decadence, ...

Clio s Laws

Offering a unique perspective on the very notions and practices of storytelling, history, memory, and language, Clio’s Laws collects ten essays (some new and some previously published in Spanish) by a revered voice in global history. Taking its title from the Greek muse of history, this opus considers issues related to the historian’s craft, including nationalism and identity, and draws on Tenorio-Trillo’s own lifetime of experiences as a historian with deep roots in both Mexico and the United States. By turns deeply ironic, provocative, and experimental, and covering topics both lowbrow and highbrow, the essays form a dialogue with Clio about idiosyncratic yet profound matters. Tenorio-Trillo presents his own version of an ars historica (what history is, why we write it, and how we abuse it) alongside a very personal essay on the relationship between poetry and history. Other selections include an exploration of the effects of a historian’s autobiography, a critique of history’s celebratory obsession, and a guide to reading history in an era of internet searches and too many books. A self-described exile, Tenorio-Trillo has produced a singular tour of the historical imagination and its universal traits.