Mexican Solidarity

The techniques and findings of this case study on Mexico provide a valuable contribution to the Nonprofit and Third Sector research internationally. "This book offers its readers a valuable insight into solidarity in Mexico.

Mexican Solidarity

During the nearly 20 years of its existence, the Centro Mexicano para la Filantropía, A.C. (Cemefi, acronym in Spanish for the Mexican Center for Philanthropy) has promoted a varied agenda of research about civil society in Mexico. Cemefi has produced and published information on the characteristics of the social organizations that make up the Mexican nonprofit sector, as well as infor- tion about the type of legal, fiscal, and economic factors that promote or hinder organized citizen participation based on the principles of solidarity, social resp- sibility, and philanthropy. Once again, with the aim of bringing together information regarding the imp- tance of practices of solidarity in the country, Cemefi has decided to contribute to understanding, making known, and ultimately promoting volunteer action and acts of solidarity undertaken by citizens in this country. The end result of this effort is portrayed in this book, Mexican Solidarity: Citizen Participation and Volunteerism, edited and coordinated by Doctor Jacqueline Butcher. It is the product of a joint effort on the part of different people and insti- tions with a common goal: finding out about the characteristics of volunteerism and, in general, citizen participation in acts of solidarity in Mexico.

Mexican Solidarity

This comprehensive volume presents research on Mexican practices of solidarity where citizens were engaged in working towards helping others voluntarily.

Mexican Solidarity


Allies Across the Border

Allies Across the Border, the first book on F.A.T., analyzes this important group in the context of the globalization of capital and the necessary globalization of labor struggle.

Allies Across the Border

North American workers find their jobs more pressured and precarious but turn on the television and find pundits praising the glories of the global economy. Their counterparts south of the Rio Grande find themselves forced into the arms of global corporations that barely pay them their daily bread for work in dangerous plants that refuse to observe minimal safety or environmental standards. No wonder inequality is increasing in both countries. Although North Americans are told that Mexicans are stealing their jobs, workers can find "allies across the border." Like the U.S. labor organizers in the early part of the 20th century who created the C.I.O. in response to A.F.L. corruption, Mexico's F.A.T. (Frente Autentico del Trabajo or Authentic Workers' Front) is building a historic movement to create an alternative to Mexico's notoriously co-opted labor unions and collusion with government international capital. Allies Across the Border, the first book on F.A.T., analyzes this important group in the context of the globalization of capital and the necessary globalization of labor struggle. Dale Hathaway shows how F.A.T.'s dedication to worker education and self-management, union independence, and community development are key, not only in Mexico, but worldwide. Allies Across the Border includes detailed descriptions of F.A.T.'s growth from its liberation theology origins, through the Worker's Uprising and student movements of the late 60s, Mexico's debt crisis of the 70s and 80s, and F.A.T.'s work with women's groups, peasants, and consumer co-ops in the 90s. Hathaway's Allies Across the Border shows how F.A.T.'s dedication to worker's dignity offers lessons for North American workers who are fighting to keep corporations from pushing for greater exploitation of workers and environment in their home countries and worldwide. Dale Hathaway is Associate Professor of Political Science at Butler University in Indianapolis.

Becoming Neighbors in a Mexican American Community

Focusing on the Mexican-origin, working-class city of La Puente in Los Angeles County, California, this book examines Mexican Americans’ everyday attitudes toward and interactions with Mexican immigrants—a topic that has so far received ...

Becoming Neighbors in a Mexican American Community

On the surface, Mexican Americans and Mexican immigrants to the United States seem to share a common cultural identity but often make uneasy neighbors. Discrimination and assimilationist policies have influenced generations of Mexican Americans so that some now fear that the status they have gained by assimilating into American society will be jeopardized by Spanish-speaking newcomers. Other Mexican Americans, however, adopt a position of group solidarity and work to better the social conditions and educational opportunities of Mexican immigrants. Focusing on the Mexican-origin, working-class city of La Puente in Los Angeles County, California, this book examines Mexican Americans' everyday attitudes toward and interactions with Mexican immigrants—a topic that has so far received little serious study. Using in-depth interviews, participant observations, school board meeting minutes, and other historical documents, Gilda Ochoa investigates how Mexican Americans are negotiating their relationships with immigrants at an interpersonal level in the places where they shop, worship, learn, and raise their families. This research into daily lives highlights the centrality of women in the process of negotiating and building communities and sheds new light on identity formation and group mobilization in the U.S. and on educational issues, especially bilingual education. It also complements previous studies on the impact of immigration on the wages and employment opportunities of Mexican Americans.

Symbol of Solidarity

Symbol of Solidarity


A Mexican Elite Family 1820 1980

The significant unit of solidarity invariably included the parents and siblings of the individual beyond marriage and beyond migration . Social interaction in shantytowns took place within and through a network of reciprocal assistance ...

A Mexican Elite Family  1820 1980

This book presents the history of the Gomez, an elite family of Mexico that today includes several hundred individuals, plus their spouses and the families of their spouses, all living in Mexico City. Tracing the family from its origins in mid-nineteenth-century Mexico through its rise under the Porfirio Diaz regime and focusing especially on the last three generations, the work shows how the Gomez have evolved a distinctive subculture and an ability to advance their economic interests under changing political and economic conditions. One of the authors' major findings is the importance of the kinship system, particularly the three-generation "grandfamily" as a basic unit binding together people of different generations and different classes. The authors show that the top entrepreneurs in the family, the direct descendants of its founder, remain the acknowledged leaders of the kin, each one ruling his business as a patron-owner through a network of clienty2Drelatives. Other family members, though belonging to the middle class, identify ideologically with the family leadership and the bourgeoisie, and family values tend to overrule considerations of strictly business interest even among entrepreneurs.

Faith and Power

In the context of neglect, racism, and displacement, ethnic Mexican solidarity explicitly tied to Pilsen reminds those forces that Mexicans are in Chicago, and Pilsen, to stay. The body, M. Shawn Copeland writes, “provokes theology.

Faith and Power

Illuminates how religion has shaped Latino politics and community building Too often religious politics are considered peripheral to social movements, not central to them. Faith and Power: Latino Religious Politics Since 1945 seeks to correct this misinterpretation, focusing on the post–World War II era. It shows that the religious politics of this period were central to secular community-building and resistance efforts. The volume traces the interplay between Latino religions and a variety of pivotal movements, from the farm worker movement to the sanctuary movement, offering breadth and nuance to this history. This illuminates how broader currents involving immigration, refugee policies, de-industrialization, the rise of the religious left and right, and the Chicana/o, immigrant, and Puerto Rican civil rights movements helped to give rise to political engagement among Latino religious actors. By addressing both the influence of these larger trends on religious movements and how the religious movements in turn helped to shape larger political currents, the volume offers a compelling look at the twentieth-century struggle for justice.

News Articles Extracted from El Fronterizo Mexican Spanish language Newspaper

These words signify that Mexico and the U.S. can contribute in a significant manner to prevent conflicts, resolve crises, promote solidarity and cooperation, and respect for the principles and rights of nations. Mexico is willing to ...

News Articles Extracted from El Fronterizo  Mexican Spanish language Newspaper


Abuses Within the Mexican Political Regulatory and Judicial Systems and Implications for the North American Free Trade Agreement NAFTA

12 SURVEY MEXICO m alarm foreign investors and jeopardise NAFTA . crude approach . Mr Salinas has thus given his opponents an in- Solidarity also exacerbates the primitive side of centive to take to the streets the day after polling ...

Abuses Within the Mexican Political  Regulatory  and Judicial Systems and Implications for the North American Free Trade Agreement  NAFTA


PRONASOL

PRONASOL