Eliot Middlemarch

The method of Middlemarch The discipline of the real It is impossible to consider the history of realism in the novel , at least as that history passes through the English novel , without quickly naming Middlemarch as a landmark .

Eliot  Middlemarch

Paying much attention to the novel's intellectual and social context, this comprehensive introduction appraises it within nineteenth-century traditions of the novel in England and Europe and emphasizes the "Woman Question."

Middlemarch

It was a maxim out his voice , as if he wanted it to hit hard . about Middlemarch , and regarded as self - evi . “ You've got no call to come an ' talk about dent , that good meat should have good drink , sticks o ' these primises ...

Middlemarch


Middlemarch in the Twenty First Century

Middlemarch in the Twenty First Century

Middlemarch is the prime example of George Eliot's dictum that "interpretations are illimitable," and in this collection of new essays Middlemarch is re-examined as an open text responsive to gaps and fissures, and as resistant to authority as it is to other fixed notions of identity, idealism, and gender. What does the novel omit, and how do the omissions shape what is there? How shall we understand the materiality of the text? What problems does it pose to adaptation? The novel's plasticity becomes a basis for investigation into the multiple forms of expressiveness, and a consideration of how we might plot the patterns linguistically, ideologically, even cinematically. New spaces emerge within character, place, and narrative; what seemed absent or inaccessible assumes shape and definition; Middlemarch remains "Victorian" but it is a Victorianism understood through the dual perspectives of the 19th and 21st centuries. Scholars of George Eliot and students of Victorianism will be engaged by the wide-ranging scope of these essays, which nonetheless build on each other to form a coherent narrative of critical reflections. If there is something for everyone in Middlemarch, there is also something compelling about each of the essays in this collection.

Middlemarch

—BOOK OF TOBIT: Marriage Prayer * IN Middlemarch a wife could not long remain ignorant that the town held a bad opinion of her husband. No feminine intimate might carry her friendship so far as to make a plain statement to the wife of ...

Middlemarch

Writing at the very moment when the foundations of Western thought were being challenged and undermined, George Eliot fashions in Middlemarch (1871-2), the quintessential Victorian novel, a concept of life and society free of the dogma of the past yet able to confront the scepticism that was taking over the age. In a panoramic sweep of English life during the years leading up to the First Reform Bill of 1832, Eliot explores nearly every subject of concern to modern life: art, religion, science, politics, self, society, human relationships. Among her characters are some of the most remarkable portraits in English literature: Dorothea Brooke, the heroine, idealistic but naive; Rosamond Vincy, beautiful and egoistic; Edward Casaubon, the dry-as-dust scholar; Tertius Lydgate, the brilliant but morally flawed physician; the passionate artist, Will Ladislaw; and Fred Vincy and Mary Garth, the childhood sweethearts whose charming courtship is one of the many humorous elements in the novel's rich comic vein. Felicia Bonaparte has provided a new introduction to this updated edition, the text of which is taken from the Clarendon critical edition.

Transport in British Fiction

Eliot, Middlemarch, 25. Eliot, Middlemarch, 30. Eliot, Middlemarch, 32. Plato, Phaedrus, trans. James H. Nichols Jr. (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1998). Eliot, Middlemarch, 32. Dorothea Barrett, Vocation and Desire: George Eliot's ...

Transport in British Fiction

Transport in British Fiction is the first essay collection devoted to transport and its various types horse, train, tram, cab, omnibus, bicycle, ship, car, air and space as represented in British fiction across a century of unprecedented technological change that was as destabilizing as it was progressive.

Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives of New Zealand

Clark , E. , Middlemarch Clark , John , Outram Clarke , Charles , Greytown Cockerill , Benjamin , Middlemarch Collins , John , Mount Hyde , Outram Crawford , Peter , Green Island Cullen , Robert , Greytown Cunningham , J. , Middlemarch ...

Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives of New Zealand


Reading Middlemarch

But Middlemarch will hold its own against all these objections , Victorian and modern . It need not leave us melancholy and empty , as its first reviewers charged , nor need we dismiss its vision of life as insufficiently complex and ...

Reading Middlemarch


George Eliot s Life as Related in Her Letters and Journals

... John Blackwood - Relinquishment of Scott Commemoration - Captain Lockhart — Letter to John Blackwood on MS . of “ Middlemarch ” - Visit from Tennyson — Letter to Mrs. Lytton on death of her son — - Letter to Miss Mary Cross on story ...

George Eliot s Life as Related in Her Letters and Journals


Dust

To Middlemarch : without benefit of archive Mary ann Evans was born in 1819 in Arbury , Nuneaton - just north of the city of Coventry - where her father was land agent to the Newdigate family . ' Middlemarch ' is Coventry , the ...

Dust

Dust is a witty and highly original investigation into the development of modern history writing. This book considers how history writing belongs to the currents of thought shaping the modern world, and suggests that, like dust, the 'matter of history' can never go away or be erased.

The Victorian Bookshelf

As Daniel Burt wrote, "Middlemarch remains, like Tolstoy's War and Peace, an exemplary novel because it both risked and achieved so much in pursuit of a comprehensive vision of human nature and experience." The last words here are left ...

The Victorian Bookshelf

This introductory guide to the canon of Victorian literature covers 61 novels by authors from Jane Austen to Emile Zola. Brief critical essays describe what each book is about and argue for its cultural, historical and literary importance. Literary canons remain a subject of debate but critics, readers and students continue to find them useful as overviews--and examinations--of the great works within a given period or culture. The Victorian canon is particularly rich with splendid novels that educate, enlighten and entertain.

From Madman to Crime Fighter

This Particular Web: Essays on Middlemarch. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1975. Briggs, Asa. “Middlemarch and the Doctors.” Cambridge Journal, Sept. 1948. Cline, C. L. “Qualifications of Medical Practitioners of Middlemarch.

From Madman to Crime Fighter

Introduction -- Evil alchemists and Doctor Faustus -- Bacon's new scientists -- Foolish virtuosi -- Newton: a scientist for God -- Arrogant and godless: scientists in eighteenth-century satire -- Inhuman scientists: the romantic perception -- Frankenstein and the creature -- Victorian scientists: doubt and struggle -- The scientist as adventurer -- Efficiency and power: the scientist under scrutiny -- The scientist as hero -- Mad, bad, and dangerous to know: reality overtakes fiction -- The impersonal scientist -- Scientia gratia scientiae: the amoral scientist -- Pandora's box -- Robots, cyborgs, androids and clones: who is in control? -- The scientist as woman -- Idealism and conscience -- Watershed: the new scientists

Outside the Pale

11 Those analyses are positioned in what I see as a blind spot in the work of such deconstructive critics in Neil Hertz , D. A. Miller , and Gayatri Spivak , whose analyses of Middlemarch , Bleak House , and Jane Eyre have been crucial ...

Outside the Pale

In his 1850 article "Prostitution," W. R. Greg asserts that nineteenth-century society conceived of prostitutes as "far more out of the pale of humanity than negroes on a slave plantation or fellahs in a Pasha's dungeon." Elsie B. Michie here provides insightful readings of novels by Mary Shelley, Emily and Charlotte Bronte, Elizabeth Gaskell, and George Eliot, writers who confronted definitions of femininity which denied them full participation in literary culture. Exploring a series of abhorrent images - Frankenstein's monster, a simianized caricature of the Irish, the menstruating woman alluded to in debates on access to higher education, and the fallen woman - Michie traces the links between the Victorian definition of femininity and other forms of cultural exclusion such as race and class distinctions. Michie considers a range of fiction written in the period 1818-1870, paying particular attention to changes in the construction of gender which coincided with changing attitudes toward colonial and class relations. Drawing on the work of such theorists as Teresa de Lauretis, Catherine Gallagher, Mary Poovey, Gayatri Spivak, and Homi Bhabha, she maps out connections between two excluded territories, one defined by gender and the other by class, race, and economics. Michie transforms our understanding of familiar novels including Wuthering Heights and Middlemarch in which the two themes are articulated together, as she illuminates political, economic, and social issues connected to models of difference. Literary theorists, feminist scholars, Victorianists, and others interested in cultural studies and the history of the novel will welcome this perceptive and engaging book.

Sunset

... Deutschen Novellenschatz- Letter to Mrs. Congreve - Mrs. Geddes's marriage - Letter to John Blackwood - Relinquishment of Scott Commemoration - Captain Lockhart - Letter to John Blackwood on MS . of " Middlemarch Visit from Tennyson ...

Sunset


Thinking Through Style

George Eliot, Middlemarch, ed. David Carroll (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996), 7. Kent Puckett, 'Looking Good: Style and its Absence in George Eliot', in Bad Form: Social Mistakes and the Nineteenth-Century Novel (Oxford: Oxford ...

Thinking Through Style

What is 'style', and how does it relate to thought in language? It has often been treated as something merely linguistic, independent of thought, ornamental; stylishness for its own sake. Or else it has been said to subserve thought, by mimicking, delineating, or heightening ideas that are already expressed in the words. This ambitious and timely book explores a third, more radical possibility in which style operates as a verbal mode of thinking through. Rather than figure thought as primary and pre-verbal, and language as a secondary delivery system, style is conceived here as having the capacity to clarify or generate thinking. The book's generic focus is on non-fiction prose, and it looks across the long nineteenth century. Leading scholars survey twenty authors to show where writers who have gained reputations as either 'stylists' or as 'thinkers' exploit the interplay between 'the what' and 'the how' of their prose. The study demonstrates how celebrated stylists might, after all, have thoughts worth attending to, and that distinguished thinkers might be enriched for us if we paid more due to their style. More than reversing the conventional categories, this innovative volume shows how 'style' and 'thinking' can be approached as a shared concern. At a moment when, especially in nineteenth-century studies, interest in style is re-emerging, this book revaluates some of the most influential figures of that age, re-imagining the possible alliances, interplays, and generative tensions between thinking, thinkers, style, and stylists.

Bad Form

For what, we are again and again asked, is Middlemarch if not a novel with brains to spare? If, however, Middlemarch is a novel that theoretically eschews the somatic cheap shot, it cannot seem to get enough of that shot's ...

Bad Form

Bad Form argues that the social mistake - the blunder, the gaffe, the faux pas - is crucial to the structure of the nineteenth-century novel.

Encyclopedia of the Novel

Middlemarch. by. George. Eliot. Midnight's Children by Salman Rushdie Migrations by Milos Crnjanski Seobe, ... 1984 Waugh, Patricia, Metafiction, London and New York: Methuen, 1984 In a review of Middlemarch, Edith Simcox remarked, ...

Encyclopedia of the Novel

First Published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Comfort of Strangers

In Middlemarch's whispered rewriting of the opening sentence of Pride and Prejudice, the certainty of this voice indicates that the romantic convergence of Rosamond and Lydgate is both a foregone conclusion, a truth universally ...

The Comfort of Strangers

This text argues for a new understanding of the relation between nineteenth-century realist literary form and the socially dense environments of modernity.

The English Middle Class Novel

Middlemarch is not peopled with Celias; but Celia is of Middlemarch in a sense that her sister is not. She vividly typifies, and draws on, certain solid Middlemarch, middleclass virtues. The sense that Celia's insights, ...

The English Middle Class Novel


The Nation

If any critic will IS S'Middlemarch ' the most successful as it is certainly the most elaborate | candidly compare the Clerical Sketches ' and ' Middlemarch , ' he will admit effort of George Eliot's genius ? that the form of the one ...

The Nation


Journal Appendix

Haggart , B. D. , Mosgiel Hamilton , J. , Outram 09 Hamilton , R. B. , Wylie's Crossing 1,514 Harraway , E. , Kuri Bush Harris , Mrs. Emma , Maungatua 152 Harrison , M. F. , Hindon 1,405 Hedge , I. , Middlemarch 200 Heenan Bros.

Journal  Appendix