Minoan Cushion Seals

This book is about a single Minoan seal shape, the cushion seal - a rectangular stone with biconvex faces -- so called because its profile resembles a cushion.

Minoan Cushion Seals

This book is about a single Minoan seal shape, the cushion seal - a rectangular stone with biconvex faces -- so called because its profile resembles a cushion. This shape is specific to Minoan culture. The first securely-dated cushions appear in Middle Minoan IIB but its floruit is Middle Minoan III-Late Minoan IA, after which it essentially dies out. While, in its early days, the materials, style, and motifs were similar to those of other seal shapes, it later developed a recognizable, perhaps semi-independent style and iconography of its own. Some of the finest examples of Minoan glyptic art appear on cushions. Who crafted them? Had they any special meaning? Why did the shape so abruptly disppear? This book is the first to examine all aspects of cushion seals and to compare them with other contemporary forms of glyptic art. It aims to cast new light on style and form at the transition from the Protopalatial to early Neopalatial period on Crete.

Seals and Sealing in the Ancient World

Her dissertation examined Early Dynastic seal imagery from Ur, looking specifically at its relationship to early cuneiform ... The Transformation of Egyptian Taweret into the Minoan Genius, and Minoan Cushion Seals: Innovation in Form, ...

Seals and Sealing in the Ancient World

Studies of seals and sealing practices have traditionally investigated aspects of social, political, economic, and ideological systems in ancient societies throughout the Old World. Previously, scholarship has focused on description and documentation, chronology and dynastic histories, administrative function, iconography, and style. More recent studies have emphasized context, production and use, and increasingly, identity, gender, and the social lives of seals, their users, and the artisans who produced them. Using several methodological and theoretical perspectives, this volume presents up-to-date research on seals that is comparative in scope and focus. The cross-cultural and interdisciplinary approach advances our understanding of the significance of an important class of material culture of the ancient world. The volume will serve as an essential resource for scholars, students, and others interested in glyptic studies, seal production and use, and sealing practices in the Ancient Near East, Egypt, Ancient South Asia and the Aegean during the 4th-2nd Millennia BCE.

Religion and Society in Middle Bronze Age Greece

Examples of Minoan luxury goods such as stone vases, seals, and beads have also been found in settlement contexts.187 That there were fairly extensive ... A Middle Minoan cushion seal was found at Ayios Stephanos (Taylour 1972, 236).

Religion and Society in Middle Bronze Age Greece

The Middle Helladic period has received little attention, partially because of scholars' view of it as merely the prelude to the Mycenaean period and partially because of the dearth of archaeological evidence from the period. In this book, Helène Whittaker demonstrates that Middle Helladic Greece is far more interesting than its material culture might at first suggest. Whittaker comprehensively reviews and discusses the archaeological evidence for religion on the Greek mainland, focusing on the relationship between religious expression and ideology. The book argues that religious beliefs and rituals played a significant role in the social changes that were occurring at the time. The arguments and conclusions of this book will be relevant beyond the Greek Bronze Age and will contribute to the general archaeological debate on prehistoric religion.

Minoan Realities

7 AND 8 Seal images from Sklavokampos of a distinct ceremonial place, in all likelihood (after CMS ".6, no. 256) and from Knossos (after reflecting a ... 9 AND 10 Cushion seal from Pylos (after CMS I, no. 293) and gold ring from Tiryns ...

Minoan Realities

What is the social role of images and architecture in a pre-modern society? How were they used to create adequate environments for specific profane and ritual activities? In which ways did they interact with each other? These and other crucial issues on the social significance of imagery and built structures in Neopalatial Crete were the subject of a workshop which took place on November 16th, 2009 at the University of Heidelberg. The papers presented in the workshop are collected in the present volume. They provide different approaches to this complex topic and are aimed at a better understanding of the formation, role, and perception of images and architecture in a very dynamic social landscape. The Cretan Neopalatial period saw a rapid increase in the number of palaces and 'villas', characterized by elaborate designs and idiosyncratic architectural patterns which were themselves in turn generated by a pressing desire for a distinctive social and performative environment.

Current Approaches and New Perspectives in Aegean Iconography

... A. M. Jasink & J. Weingarten, Minoan Cushion Seals: Innovation in Form, Style, and Use in Bronze Age Glyptic, Rome (2014). Doumas 2016 Ch. Doumas, Prehistoric Thera, Athens (2016). Dubcová 2015 V. Dubcová, The Near Eastern “Hero” ...

Current Approaches and New Perspectives in Aegean Iconography

The aim of this volume is to present an overview of current trends and individual methodological attempts towards arriving at an adequate understanding of Minoan, Cycladic, and Mycenaean iconography.

Minoan Realities

7 and 8 Seal images from Sklavokampos of a distinct ceremonial place, in all likelihood (after CMS II.6, no. ... Figs 9 and 10 Cushion seal from Pylos (after CMS I, can be understood as representing outdoor scenes, as is indicated by ...

Minoan Realities

What is the social role of images and architecture in a pre-modern society? How were they used to create adequate environments for specific profane and ritual activities? In which ways did they interact with each other? These and other crucial issues on the social significance of imagery and built structures in Neopalatial Crete were the subject of a workshop which took place on November 16th, 2009 at the University of Heidelberg. The papers presented in the workshop are collected in the present volume. They provide different approaches to this complex topic and are aimed at a better understanding of the formation, role, and perception of images and architecture in a very dynamic social landscape. The Cretan Neopalatial period saw a rapid increase in the number of palaces and ‘villas', characterized by elaborate designs and idiosyncratic architectural patterns which were themselves in turn generated by a pressing desire for a distinctive social and performative environment. At the same time, a new form of imagery made its appearance in a broad spectrum of objects and spaces which were ‘decorated' with meaningful motifs chosen from a restricted and repetitive pictorial repertoire. This standardized repertoire indicates the configuration of a coherent pictorial program which was implemented in several social situations. The present volume is intended not only for specialists in Minoan culture but also for readers who are interested in the social dimension of images and architectural remains and especially in issues relating to their materiality, use and perception.

Materiality and Consumption in the Bronze Age Mediterranean

This was clearly a Minoan import; Minoan seal carvers had a long tradition in carving seals from semi-precious stone, ... Grave Seal or Signet Iconography III (Karo 1930- Cushion—shaped seal Lion hunt: rampant lion to right 1933: no.

Materiality and Consumption in the Bronze Age Mediterranean

The importance of cultural contacts in the East Mediterranean has long been recognized and is the focus of ongoing international research. Fieldwork in the Aegean, Egypt, Cyprus, and the Levant continues to add to our understanding of the nature of this contact and its social and economic significance, particularly to the cultures of the Aegean. Despite sophisticated discussion of the archaeological evidence, in particular on the part of Aegean and Mediterranean archaeologists, there has been little systematic attempt to incorporate anthropological perspectives on materiality and exchange into archaeological narratives of this material. This book addresses that gap and integrates anthropological discourse on contact, examining exchange systems, the gift, notions of geographical distance and power, colonization, and hybridization. Furthermore, it develops a social narrative of culture contact in the Mediterranean context, illustrating the reasons communities chose to engage in international exchange, and how this impacted the construction of identities throughout the region. While traditional archaeologies in the East Mediterranean have tended to be reductive in their approach to material culture and how it was produced, used, and exchanged, this book reviews current research on material culture, focusing on issues such as the biography of objects, inalienable possessions, and hybridization – exploring how these issues can further illuminate the material world of the communities of the Bronze Age Mediterranean.

Hatshepsut from Queen to Pharaoh

Characteristic features include the partly shaved scalp, painted in blue (for gray), that signals an acrobat 's young age;7 the fiounced skirt worn by a lady or goddess; the Minoan kilt of an acrobat, cushion-shaped seal at his wrist, ...

Hatshepsut  from Queen to Pharaoh

A fascinating look at the artistically productive reign of Hatshepsut, a female pharaoh in ancient Egypt

Minoan Glyptic

The new shapes consisted of the « cushion » seal ( Pictures 6.6 , 7 , 8.2 , 8.4 ) which was known since the Protopalatial period ( CMS II 2 , no . 70 ; XII , no . 124 ) and probably evolved from rectangular seals with convex faces and ...

Minoan Glyptic

This study considers the massive importance of glyptic in Aegean culture, often undermined by more 'convenient' evidence - such as architecture, frescoes, figurines and gold jewellery. The sealstones, sealings and finger rings so commonly associated with Minoan civilisation can be viewed as important markers of socioeconomic, technological, and artistic significance. This book focuses on the typology of seals in different periods, the deposits in which the most important seal groups have been found, and their iconography and religious significance. The typology of the Late Minoan glyptic iconography according to its most important and representative religious and decorative elements is also tabulated and catalogued.

Aegean Bronze Age Art

As is the case in various other forms of material culture in the Protopalatial period, seals show some strong regional ... with motifs borrowed from earlier seals, such as the Parading Lions group of Early Minoan III–Middle Minoan IA.

Aegean Bronze Age Art

Offers an innovative theory for ancient art and its creativity, demonstrated through the rich material and visual culture of the protohistoric Aegean.

Wonders Lost and Found A Celebration of the Archaeological Work of Professor Michael Vickers

Cushion- shaped seal AN2014.1. ... It was Judith Weingarten who first suggested that the long-lived popular Egyptian demon Bes might have inspired motifs on some Minoan seals, in that instance some of the bizarre motifs on LM I seal ...

Wonders Lost and Found  A Celebration of the Archaeological Work of Professor Michael Vickers

Twenty-one contributions, written by friends and colleagues, reflect the wide interests of Professor Michael Vickers; from the Aegean Bronze Age to the use made of archaeology by dictators in the modern age. Seven contributions relate to Georgia, where the Professor has worked most recently, and made his home.

The Erlenmeyer Collection of Cretan Seals

Late Minoan II - IIIA LITERATURE : CMS no . 122 LITERATURE : CMS no . 129 1900-1,200 A close parallel for this motif is provided by a cushion seal of agate in the Ashmolean Museum ( Kenna , Cretan Seals , Oxford 1960 , no .

The Erlenmeyer Collection of Cretan Seals


The Aegean and the Orient in the Second Millennium

255 The cushion is , however , also a characteristic Minoan seal shape.2 256 Evidence from Minoan tombs demonstrates that not only lentoids were worn at the wrist , but also other seal types.257 As convincingly argued by N. Marinatos ...

The Aegean and the Orient in the Second Millennium


Corpus der minoischen und mykenischen Siegel Beiheft V

Similar goats with heads bent downward and legs placed close together occur already in the MM II period on a Kamares pot and on a sealing from Phaistos ( Fig . 10a ) . A Minoan cushion seal depicting a dog below a cliff on which stands ...

Corpus der minoischen und mykenischen Siegel  Beiheft V


Marks of Distinction

A wild goat in a related posture on a Minoan cushion seal stands on a cliff with a dog below ( Fig . 292 ) ; " 1 said to be from Archanes , it probably dates to the period of the Ugarit seal . - The scheme of composition - with animals ...

Marks of Distinction

This study uses seals to examine and plot cultural interactions between the Aegean and Near Eastern worlds during the period of Minoan dominance (c.2600-1360 BC). By identifying distinctive features of seals from Anatolia, Syria and Egypt it is possible to plot geographical interconnections with the Aegean and the Aegean seals with styles influenced by them. The book contains an extensive catalogue of 253 seals.

Aegyptiaca on the Island of Crete in Their Chronological Context

The most pressing to mention here is the ' genius ' shown on a Minoan cushion seal { 87 } found in an LM IIIA2 tomb ... a dead agrimi that heralds a new Neo - Palatial iconography found on seals and seal impressions in LM IB contexts .

Aegyptiaca on the Island of Crete in Their Chronological Context


The Oxford Handbook of the Bronze Age Aegean

Late Minoan I is a time of growing prosperity throughout Crete. ... Perhaps at the behest of the new bureaucracy, sealing shapes are pared down to just three: cushion and lentoid seals, which developed out of earlier shapes, ...

The Oxford Handbook of the Bronze Age Aegean

This Oxford handbook provides a comprehensive overview of our current understanding of the Bronze Age Aegean (ca. 3000-1000 BC) and describes the most important debates and discussions within the discipline. 66 articles in 4 sections cover topics ranging from chronological and geographical to thematic to site-specific.

Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies of the University of London

They form a typical burial assemblage of a Minoan tholos , including eight seals , 20 bone amulets , a handful of stone beads ... a seal ring , two cylinder seals with ' architectural ' ornament and two cushion - shaped seals .

Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies of the University of London