Mitla Zapotec Texts

This third volume in the series Folklore Texts in Mexican Indian Languages consists of eight stories narrated by native speakers, transcribed phonemically, with glossing in English and free translations in English and Spanish.

Mitla Zapotec Texts

Gives a grammatical sketch of Zapotec (Mitla Vallay, Oaxaca, Mexico). This third volume in the series Folklore Texts in Mexican Indian Languages consists of eight stories narrated by native speakers, transcribed phonemically, with glossing in English and free translations in English and Spanish.

The Tar Baby

... “Tarbaby,” in Mixteco Texts (Norman, OK: Summer Institute of Linguistics of the University of Oklahoma, 1959), 3344; Pedro Aguilar, “The Rabbit and the Coyote,” in Mitla Zapotec Texts: Folklore Texts in Mexican Indian Languages, ed.

The Tar Baby

Perhaps the best-known version of the tar baby story was published in 1880 by Joel Chandler Harris in Uncle Remus: His Songs and His Sayings, and popularized in Song of the South, the 1946 Disney movie. Other versions of the story, however, have surfaced in many other places throughout the world, including Nigeria, Brazil, Corsica, Jamaica, India, and the Philippines. The Tar Baby offers a fresh analysis of this deceptively simple story about a fox, a rabbit, and a doll made of tar and turpentine, tracing its history and its connections to slavery, colonialism, and global trade.

Language Contact and Change in Mesoamerica and Beyond

Zapotec Oral Literature; El folklore de San Lorenzo Texmelucan. Dallas TX: Summer Institute of Linguistics. Stubblefield, Morris & de Stubblefield, Carol Miller. 1994. Mitla Zapotec Texts. Dallas TX: Summer Institute International.

Language Contact and Change in Mesoamerica and Beyond

Language-contact phenomena in Mesoamerica and adjacent regions present an exciting field for research that has the potential to significantly contribute to our understanding of language contact and the role that it plays in language change. This volume presents and analyzes fresh empirical data from living and/or extinct Mesoamerican languages (from the Mayan, Uto-Aztecan, Totonac-Tepehuan and Otomanguean groups), neighboring non-Mesoamerican languages (Apachean, Arawakan, Andean languages), as well as Spanish. Language-contact effects in these diverse languages and language groups are typically analyzed by different subfields of linguistics that do not necessarily interact with one another. It is hoped that this volume, which contains works from different scholarly traditions that represent a variety of approaches to the study of language contact, will contribute to the lessening of this compartmentalization. The volume is relevant to researchers of language contact and contact-induced change and to anyone interested both in the historical development and present features of indigenous languages of the Americas and Latin American Spanish.

Visiting the Calvario at Mitla Oaxaca

2005 Nicachi Songs: Zapotec Ritual Texts and Postclassic Ritual Knowledge in Colonial Oaxaca Electronic document, http://www.famsi.org/reports/02050/index.html, accessed 4-6-2006. Turner, V. 1974 Dramas, Fields and Metaphors. Ithaca.

Visiting the Calvario at Mitla  Oaxaca

In the centre of the Mexican town of Mitla stands a run-down chapel on an overgrown pre-colonial pyramid. The chapel, housing three crosses, is the town's Calvario, the local representation of the hill on which Christ died. Although buses full of tourists on their way to Chiapas or on daytrips from Oaxaca City swarm the town every day almost none of them ever visit the Calvario. Instead they stick to the tourist zone to marvel at the famous mosaic friezes of the pre-colonial temples and shop for traditional souvenirs in the tourist market. If they would climb the steep steps to the chapel they would discover that despite appearances the building still sees extensive use as pilgrims from the wide Zapotec region visit it to bring offerings to and ask favours of the souls of their dearly departed. And as these offerings consist of elaborate arrangements of flowers, fruits, black candles, cacao beans and bundles of copal incense, such tourists might well start to wonder where the origins of these practices lie. It is this question that this thesis seeks to answer. To achieve this, current theories on cultural continuity, syncretism, the materiality of religion and ritual theory are combined with a study of archaeological, historical, iconographical and anthropological sources. In addition ethnographic fieldwork has been conducted to come to a better understanding of the offerings made in the Calvario today. In three parts, the thesis first addresses the history of Mitla as 'The Place of the Dead', then of the Calvario as a ritual location and finally of the offerings for the dead. Combining these three lines of research an interesting image is formed of the continuity of ancestor veneration in this busy tourist town.

Complex Sentences in Grammar and Discourse

Mitla Zapotec texts. SIL. Taylor, C. 1985. Nkore-Kiga. London: Croom Helm. Tucker, A. and Tompo Mpaayei, I. 1961. A Maasai grammar. London: Longman, Green & Co. Van Driem, G. 1987. A grammar ofLimbu. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

Complex Sentences in Grammar and Discourse

The papers in this volume in honor of Sandra Annear Thompson deal with complex sentences, an important topic in Thompson’s career. The focus of the contributions is on the ways in which the grammatical properties of complex sentences are shaped by the communicative context in which they are produced, an approach to grammatical analysis that Thompson pioneered and developed in the course of her distinguished career.

Santa Barbara Papers in Linguistics

Diccionario Zapoteco De Mitla , Oaxaca . México , D.F .: Instituto Lingüistico de Verano , A.C. 1991. Mitla Zapotec Texts : Folklore Texts in Mexican Indian Languages 3 Dallas , Texas : Summer Institute of Linguistics .

Santa Barbara Papers in Linguistics


Ozumac n Chinantec Texts

Mitla Zapotec texts , compiled by Morris Stubblefield and Carol Stubblefield . 1994. 152 pp . For further information or a catalog of SIL publications write to : International Academic Bookstore Summer Institute of Linguistics 7500 W.

Ozumac  n Chinantec Texts

A compilation of seven stories narrated by a native speaker of this language group (southern Mexico).

Handbook of Middle American Indians Volume 16

Tlalocan, 1: 3– 30,134–54, 194–226. 1944 Theclassification of the languages of Mexico. Ibid., 2: 259–65. 1945 Cuentos de Mitla. Ibid., vol. 2, nos. 1, 2, 3. Zapotec texts: dialect of Juchitan Tehuano. Int. Jour. Amer. Ling., 12: 152–72.

Handbook of Middle American Indians  Volume 16

The publication of Volume 16 of this distinguished series brings to a close one of the largest research and documentation projects ever undertaken on the Middle American Indians. Since the publication of Volume 1 in 1964, the Handbook of Middle American Indians has provided the most complete information on every aspect of indigenous culture, including natural environment, archaeology, linguistics, social anthropology, physical anthropology, ethnology, and ethnohistory. Culminating this massive project is Volume 16, divided into two parts. Part I, Sources Cited, by Margaret A. L. Harrison, is a listing in alphabetical order of all the bibliographical entries cited in Volumes 1-11. (Volumes 12-15, comprising the Guide to Ethnohistorical Sources, have not been included, because they stand apart in subject matter and contain or constitute independent bibliographical material.) Part II, Location of Artifacts Illustrated, by Marjorie S. Zengel, details the location (at the time of original publication) of the owner of each pre-Columbian American artifact illustrated in Volumes 1-11 of the Handbook, as well as the size and the catalog, accession, and/or inventory number that the owner assigns to the object. The two parts of Volume 16 provide a convenient and useful reference to material found in the earlier volumes. The Handbook of Middle American Indians was assembled and edited at the Middle American Research Institute of Tulane University with the assistance of grants from the National Science Foundation and under the sponsorship of the National Research Council Committee on Latin American Anthropology.

The Vegetational History of the Oaxaca Valley and Zapotec Plant Knowledge

To summarize, both systematic and functional classifications in Mitla Zapotec ethnobotany share the same principles ... classified as dry and hot in the second degree in his translations of seventh through ninth century medical texts.

The Vegetational History of the Oaxaca Valley and Zapotec Plant Knowledge


Southwest Journal of Linguistics

1991. Diccionario Zapoteco de Mitla , Oaxaca . México , DF : Instituto Lingüístico de Verano . STUBBLEFIELD , MORRIS , and CAROL STUBBLEFIELD ( comps . ) 1994. Mitla Zapotec texts . Folklore texts in Mexican Indian languages 3.

Southwest Journal of Linguistics


American Indian languages and American linguistics

... analyzed narrative and conversational texts (with tapes), an analyzed set of about 600 sentences and paradigms, ... that the work on both the Mitla Zapotec and the Zoque were done before Pike's tagmemic materials were available.

American Indian languages and American linguistics


The Origin of the Sun and Moon

Mixteco Texts . Norman : Summer Institute of Linguistics . ... Mitla , Town of the Souls , and Other Zapoteco - Speaking Pueblos of Oaxaca , Mexico . ... The story of Läy and Gisaj : A Zapotec Sun and Moon Myth . Tlalocan 6 : 46-62 .

The Origin of the Sun and Moon


Handbook of Middle American Indians Volume 6

A historical legend of the Zapotecs. Ibero-Amer., no. 1. Tehuano vocabulary and Tehuano texts. MS, Library of Miguel Covarrubias, Tizapan. Cuentos de Mitla. nos. 1, 2, 3. Tlalocan, vol. 2, 1946 Zapotec texts: dialect of Juchitan Tehuano ...

Handbook of Middle American Indians  Volume 6

Social Anthropology is the sixth volume in the Handbook of Middle American Indians, published in cooperation with the Middle American Research Institute of Tulane University under the general editorship of Robert Wauchope (1909–1979). The volume editor is Manning Nash (1924–2001), Professor of Anthropology at the Center for Study of Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago. This volume provides a synthetic and comparative summary of native ethnography and ethnology of Mexico and Central America, written by authorities in a number of broad fields: the native population and its identification, agricultural systems and food patterns, economies, crafts, fine arts, kinship and family, compadrinazgo, local and territorial units, political and religious organizations, levels of communal relations, annual and fiesta cycles, sickness, folklore, religion, mythology, psychological orientations, ethnic relationships, and topics of especial modern significance such as acculturation, nationalization, directed change, urbanization and industrialization. The articles rely on the accumulated ethnography of the region, but instead of being essentially historical in treatment, they aim toward generalizations about the uniformities and varieties of culture, society, and personality found in Middle America. The collection is an invaluable reference work on Middle America and a provocative guide to scholars engaged in furthering understanding of humans and society. The Handbook of Middle American Indians was assembled and edited at the Middle American Research Institute of Tulane University with the assistance of grants from the National Science Foundation and under the sponsorship of the National Research Council Committee on Latin American Anthropology.

Language

Stirling , Lesley . Switch - reference and discourse representation . Cambridge : Cambridge University Press , 1995. Pp . xv , 354 . Stubblefield , Morris , and Carol Stubblefield ( compilers ) Mitla Zapotec texts ( Folklore texts in ...

Language


Atlas of Languages of Intercultural Communication in the Pacific Asia and the Americas

Vol II: Texts Stephen A. Wurm, Peter Mühlhäusler, Darrell T. Tryon ... (In press) Stubblefield, Morris 1993 Diccionario zapoteco de Mitla. [Dictionary of Mitla Zapotec.] México: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano.

Atlas of Languages of Intercultural Communication in the Pacific  Asia  and the Americas

“An absolutely unique work in linguistics publishing– full of beautiful maps and authoritative accounts of well-known and little-known language encounters. Essential reading (and map-viewing) for students of language contact with a global perspective.” Prof. Dr. Martin Haspelmath, Max-Planck-Institut für Evolutionäre Anthropologie The two text volumes cover a large geographical area, including Australia, New Zealand, Melanesia, South -East Asia (Insular and Continental), Oceania, the Philippines, Taiwan, Korea, Mongolia, Central Asia, the Caucasus Area, Siberia, Arctic Areas, Canada, Northwest Coast and Alaska, United States Area, Mexico, Central America, and South America. The Atlas is a detailed, far-reaching handbook of fundamental importance, dealing with a large number of diverse fields of knowledge, with the reported facts based on sound scholarly research and scientific findings, but presented in a form intelligible to non-specialists and educated lay persons in general.

Newsletter

The authors include a brief sketch of the culture , a phonemic description , and background information about the narrator . ) Mitla Zapotec Texts . Morris Stubblefield & Carol Stubblefield . Folklore Texts in Mexican Indian Languages 3 ...

Newsletter


Yumtzilob

Mitla Zapotec Texts . Folklore Texts in Mexican Indian Languages , No 3. Dallas : S.I.L. , Academic Pubs . , 1995 , 148 pp . , $ 15.75 ( ISBN 0-88312-700-8 ) . J.M. Chevalier , D. Buckles , A Land without Gods .

Yumtzilob


Handbook of Middle American Indians Volume 5

RADIN, PAUL 419 1925 The distribution and phonetics ofthe Zapotec dialects: a preliminary sketch. JSAP, 17: 27–76. Contains comparative word list ... 420 1929 Huave texts. IJAL, 5: 1–56. ... Also issued separatelyas: Cuentosde Mitla ...

Handbook of Middle American Indians  Volume 5

This volume, the fifth in the Handbook of Middle American Indians, presents a summary of work accomplished since the Spanish conquest in the contemporary description and historical reconstruction of the indigenous languages and language families of Mexico and Central America. The essays include the following: “Inventory of Descriptive Materials” by William Bright; “Inventory of Classificatory Materials” by Maria Teresa Fernández de Miranda, “Lexicostatistic Classification” by Morris Swadesh, “Systemic Comparison and Reconstruction” by Robert Longacre, and “Environmental Correlational Studies” by Sarah C. Gudschinsky. Sketches of Classical Nahuatl by Stanley Newman, Classical Yucatec Maya by Norman A. McQuown, and Classical Quiché by Munro S. Edmonson provide working tools for tackling the voluminous early postconquest texts in these languages of late preconquest empires (Aztec, Maya, Quiché). Further sketches of Sierra Popoluca by Benjamin F. Elson, of Isthmus Zapotec by Velma B. Pickett, of Huautla de Jiménez Mazatec by Eunice V. Pike, of Jiliapan Pame by Leonardo Manrique C., and of Huamelultec Chontal by Viola Waterhouse—together with those of Nahuatl, Maya, and Quiché—provide not only descriptive outlines of as many different linguistic structures but also linguistic representatives of seven structurally different families of Middle American languages. Miguel Léon-Portilla presents an outline of the relations between language and the culture of which it is a part and provides examples of some of these relations as revealed by contemporary research in indigenous Middle America. The volume editor, Norman A. McQuown (1914–2005), was Professor of Anthropology at The University of Chicago. He formerly taught at Hunter College and served with the Mexican Department of Indian Affairs. He carried out fieldwork with Totonac, Huastec, Tzeltal-Tzotzil, Mame, and other tribes. The Handbook of Middle American Indians was assembled and edited at the Middle American Research Institute of Tulane University with the assistance of grants from the National Science Foundation and under the sponsorship of the National Research Council Committee on Latin American Anthropology.

A Coatl n Loxicha Zapotec Grammar

Folklore Texts in Mexican Indian Languages No. 4. Dallas: Summer Institute of Linguistics. 234 pp. Stubblefield, Morris and Carol Stubblefield. 199l. Diccionario zapoteco de Mitla, Oaxaca. Serie de Vocabularios y Diccionarios Indígenas ...

A Coatl  n Loxicha Zapotec Grammar


Zapotec Oral Literature El Folklore de San Lorenzo Folklore Texts in Mexican Indian Languages 4

Mitla Zapotec texts , compiled by Morris Stubblefield and Carol Stubblefield . 1994. 152 pp . 13. Zapotec oral literature : El folklore de San Lorenzo Texmelucan , by Charles H. Speck . 1998. 254 pp . For further information or a full ...

Zapotec Oral Literature  El Folklore de San Lorenzo  Folklore Texts in Mexican Indian Languages 4

Presents a small sampling of the oral literature of the Zapotec people (Mexico) in Spanish and English.El Folklore de San Lorenzo.