Monasteries and Society in the British Isles in the Later Middle Ages

New essays on the monastic life in the later middle ages show that far from being in decline, it remained rich and vibrant.

Monasteries and Society in the British Isles in the Later Middle Ages

New essays on the monastic life in the later middle ages show that far from being in decline, it remained rich and vibrant.

Monasteries and Society in Medieval Britain

Only quite recently has a more objective assessment of the role of the monasteries in late - medieval education become ... and realistic accounts of the contribution which they were able to make to society at large in this respect .

Monasteries and Society in Medieval Britain

Sixteen contributions from the 1994 Harlaxton Symposium which investigate the deeply entrenched and mutually beneficial relationship between monasticism and society that lasted for 1000 years. The wide-ranging papers consider, amongst other subjects, the role of minsters and monasteries in Anglo-Saxon England and Pictish Scotland, the influence of sculpture, art and manuscripts on the secular church, the relationship between Peterorough and its abbey between 1200 and the 1530s, almonry schools, Chaucer's nuns, the monks of Ely at Cambridge University and English and Welsh monastic bishops. Includes a tribute to Daniel Williams. Contributors: Sarah Foot, David Rollason, Isabel Henderson, David Postles, Nigel Morgan, D F Mackreth, Jack Higham, Roger Bowers, Lynda Dennison, Nicholas Rogers, Lynda Rollason, Marsha L Dutton, John Greatrex, Janet Burton, Barrie Dobson and Pamela Tudor-Craig.

Monastic Life in the Medieval British Isles

A. Jessopp, Camden Society, New Series, 43 (1888) Visitations of Religious Houses in the Diocese of Lincoln: Records of Visitations Held by William Alnwick, ed. A. Hamilton Thompson, The Canterbury and York Society, 24 and 33, ...

Monastic Life in the Medieval British Isles

This book celebrates the work and contribution of Professor Janet Burton to medieval monastic studies in Britain. Burton has fundamentally changed approaches to the study of religious foundations in regional contexts (Yorkshire and Wales), placing importance on social networks for monastic structures and female Cistercian communities in medieval Britain; moreover, she has pioneered research on the canons and their place in medieval English and Welsh societies. This Festschrift comprises contributions by her colleagues, former students and friends – leading scholars in the field – who engage with and develop themes that are integral to Burton’s work. The rich and diverse collection in the present volume represents original work on religious life in the British Isles from the twelfth to the sixteenth century as homage to the transformative contribution that Burton has made to medieval monastic studies in the British Isles.

The Dependent Priories of Medieval English Monasteries

Rollason , D. , ' Symeon of Durham and the Community of Durham in the Eleventh Century ' , in England in the Eleventh Century , ed . C. Hicks ( Stamford , 1992 ) , pp . 183-98 Monasteries and Society in Early Medieval Northumbria ' ...

The Dependent Priories of Medieval English Monasteries

A history of the 140 or so daughter houses of English monasteries, considering the reasons for their foundation and their everyday life.

Landscapes of Monastic Foundation

9 A Late Neolithic , Saxon and Medieval Site at Middle Harling , Norfolk , East Anglian Archaeology 74 ( Gressenhall ... Monasteries and Society in Medieval Britain , Harlaxton Medieval Studies 6 ( Stamford , 1999 ) , pp .

Landscapes of Monastic Foundation

A history of monastic foundations in East Anglia, from the middle Anglo-Saxon period to the Normans.

A Monastic Renaissance at St Albans

BAS ELL, C., Virgil in Medieval England: Figuring the Aeneid from the Twelfth Century to Chaucer, Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature 24 (Cambridge, 1995). ... Monasteries and Society in Medieval Britain (Stamford, 1999), 177–222.

A Monastic Renaissance at St Albans

A Monastic Renaissance at St Albans is a study of intellectual life at the abbey of St Albans - one of Britain's greatest Benedictine monasteries - during the lifetime of Thomas Walsingham (c.1340-1422), one of the most prolific scholars of the later middle ages. It has always been assumed that the monasteries fell into decline long before the dissolution and that cultural and intellectual activities were largely abandoned as the monks surrendered themselves to high living and low morals. This study challenges this view. Drawing on a wide variety of manuscript sources, it shows that education, independent study, and even the co-ordinated copying of books continued to flourish at St Albans (and its affiliate houses) for much of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. In fact the abbey emerged as one of the country's most influential centres of learning, a clearing-house for books and ideas in Ricardian and Lancastrian England. Thomas Walsingham himself played a key part in this renaissance in monastic studies; his works were copied and circulated throughout the St Albans network and his influence acted upon the next generation of monastic readers and writers. Walsingham was not only a compiler of contemporary chronicles but also a Classical scholar of extraordinary originality. His commentary on Ovid's Metamorphoses, his re-working of the histories of Alexander of Macedon and the Trojan War, and his Genealogia deorum gentilium, are discussed in detail here for the first time. Walsingham's interest in the Classics was shared by many of his St Albans colleagues, and they in turn were members of a wider circle of literary scholars, which included the London schoolmaster, John Seward. The work of these scholars, monastic and secular, points towards a revival of Classical and literary scholarship in England long before Italian humanism and other traces of the continental Renaissance first found their way into the country.

The Dissolution of the Monasteries

The Reformation and the early British church', English Historical Review, 593–614. ... 'The relationship between the town of Peterborough and the abbey from 1200 to the Reformation', in Monasteries and society in medieval Britain, (ed.) ...

The Dissolution of the Monasteries

The first account of the dissolution of the monasteries for fifty years--exploring its profound impact on the people of Tudor England Shortly before Easter, 1540 saw the end of almost a millennium of monastic life in England. Until then religious houses had acted as a focus for education, literary, and artistic expression and even the creation of regional and national identity. Their closure, carried out in just four years between 1536 and 1540, caused a dislocation of people and a disruption of life not seen in England since the Norman Conquest. Drawing on the records of national and regional archives as well as archaeological remains, James Clark explores the little-known lives of the last men and women who lived in England's monasteries before the Reformation. Clark challenges received wisdom, showing that buildings were not immediately demolished and Henry VIII's subjects were so attached to the religious houses that they kept fixtures and fittings as souvenirs. This rich, vivid history brings back into focus the prominent place of abbeys, priories, and friaries in the lives of the English people.

Pleasure and Leisure in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Age

.”4 This strong cultural affiliation between the aristocracy and the monastery is further underscored by Barbara ... Anglo-Saxon Society,” Monasteries and Society in Medieval Britain: Proceedings of the 1994 Harlaxton Symposium, ed.

Pleasure and Leisure in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Age

Jan Huizinga and Roger Caillois have already taught us to realize how important games and play have been for pre-modern civilization. Recent research has begun to acknowledge the fundamental importance of these aspects in cultural, religious, philosophical, and literary terms. This volume expands on the traditional approach still very much focused on the materiality of game (toys, cards, dice, falcons, dolls, etc.) and acknowledges that game constituted also a form of coming to terms with human existence in an unstable and volatile world determined by universal randomness and fortune. Whether considering blessings or horse fighting, falconry or card games, playing with dice or dolls, we can gain a much deeper understanding of medieval and early modern society when we consider how people pursued pleasure and how they structured their leisure time. The contributions examine a wide gamut of approaches to pleasure, considering health issues, eroticism, tournaments, playing music, reading and listening, drinking alcohol, gambling and throwing dice. This large issue was also relevant, of course, in non-Christian societies, and constitutes a critical concern both for the past and the present because we are all homines ludentes.

Heaven and Earth in Anglo Saxon England

Monasteries and Society in Medieval Britain: Proceedings of the 1994 HarlaxtonSymposium (Stamford: Paul Watkins,1999), 262–76. Rollason, D.W.,'Lists of saints' restingplaces in AngloSaxon England', AngloSaxon England 7 (1978): 61–94.

Heaven and Earth in Anglo Saxon England

Christian theology and religious belief were crucially important to Anglo-Saxon society, and are manifest in the surviving textual, visual and material evidence. This is the first full-length study investigating how Christian theology and religious beliefs permeated society and underpinned social values in early medieval England. The influence of the early medieval Church as an institution is widely acknowledged, but Christian theology itself is generally considered to have been accessible only to a small educated elite. This book shows that theology had a much greater and more significant impact than has been recognised. An examination of theology in its social context, and how it was bound up with local authorities and powers, reveals a much more subtle interpretation of secular processes, and shows how theological debate affected the ways that religious and lay individuals lived and died. This was not a one-way flow, however: this book also examines how social and cultural practices and interests affected the development of theology in Anglo-Saxon England, and how ‘popular’ belief interacted with literary and academic traditions. Through case-studies, this book explores how theological debate and discussion affected the personal perspectives of Christian Anglo-Saxons, including where possible those who could not read. In all of these, it is clear that theology was not detached from society or from the experiences of lay people, but formed an essential constituent part.

The Benedictines in the Middle Ages

1265–1540', in Monasteries and Society in Medieval Britain: Proceedings of the 1994 Harlaxton Symposium, ed. b.J. Thompson, harlaxton medieval studies 6 (stamford, 1999), pp. 177–222 costambeys, m., Power and Patronage in Early Medieval ...

The Benedictines in the Middle Ages

A comprehensive survey of the origins, development, and influence of the most important monastic order in the middle ages.

Donations to the Knights Hospitaller in Britain and Ireland 1291 1400

Monasteries and Society in Medieval Britain (Stamford, 1999), pp. 27–33. One account of the Dissolution of the Monasteries in Yorkshire states that monasticism in the county had ended by January 1540, despite the Hospital not being ...

Donations to the Knights Hospitaller in Britain and Ireland  1291 1400

Donations to the Knights Hospitaller in Britain and Ireland, 1291-1400 is the first study of donations to the Knights Hospitaller throughout England and Ireland during the late-thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. The book demonstrates that patrons donated to both military and non-military orders for much the same reasons, particularly family connections or the desire for spiritual benefit, rather than an interest in crusading. Such a conclusion has important implications for the treatment of the military orders by scholars of medieval religion, who traditionally have either overlooked these orders entirely or relegated them to a subfield of crusade studies rather than treating them as a full part of mainstream religious life. By reincorporating the military orders into mainstream religious history, discussion will be furthered in a range of fields and debates, such as ecclesiastical landholding, lay-church relations, the role of women in religion, and the processes of the Reformation. By focusing on the period 1291 to 1400, the book considers the impact of the loss of the Holy Land in 1291; the subsequent diffusion in crusade activity to the Baltic and Spain; the intensification of the order’s career as English royal servants in Wales, Scotland, and Ireland; and the Hospitallers’ crusade to Rhodes in 1309-10. This book will appeal to scholars and students of the Hospitallers, as well as those interested in medieval Britain and Ireland.

The Nobility and Ecclesiastical Patronage in Thirteenth Century England

109—67 Stober, Karen, Late Medieval Monasteries and Their Patrons: England and Wales, c.1300—1540 (Woodbridge, ... J.R., 'The Laicization of French and English Society in the Thirteenth Century', Speculum, 15 (1940), 76—86 Stutz, U., ...

The Nobility and Ecclesiastical Patronage in Thirteenth Century England

A detailed examination of the patronage rights exerted over the church by the nobility, illuminating the complex network of relationships between them, the Church, and the clergy.

The Masculine Self in Late Medieval England

1337–1539,” in Monasteries and Society in Medieval Britain: Proceedings of the1994 Harlaxton Symposium, ed. Benjamin Thompson (Stamford, U.K.: Paul Watkins, 1999); F. Donald Logan, Runaway Religious in Medieval England, c.1240–1540 ...

The Masculine Self in Late Medieval England

What did it mean to be a man in medieval England? Most would answer this question by alluding to the power and status men enjoyed in a patriarchal society, or they might refer to iconic images of chivalrous knights. While these popular ideas do have their roots in the history of the aristocracy, the experience of ordinary men was far more complicated. Marshalling a wide array of colorful evidence—including legal records, letters, medical sources, and the literature of the period—Derek G. Neal here plumbs the social and cultural significance of masculinity during the generations born between the Black Death and the Protestant Reformation. He discovers that social relations between men, founded on the ideals of honesty and self-restraint, were at least as important as their domination and control of women in defining their identities. By carefully exploring the social, physical, and psychological aspects of masculinity, The Masculine Self in Late Medieval England offers a uniquely comprehensive account of the exterior and interior lives of medieval men.

Self representation of Medieval Religious Communities

31 R. B. DOBSON, 'English and Welsh Monastic Bishops: the final century, 1433–1533', in: Monasteries and Society in Medieval Britain, ed. B. THOMPSON (Stamford, 1999), pp. 348–67; R. HAINES, 'Regular Clergy and the Episcopate in the ...

Self representation of Medieval Religious Communities

This book explores the medieval monastery as symbolic space (locus symbolicus) and looks at forms of self-representation in medieval monastic life. Papers focus on both the transitory nature of organised religious life, which is based on symbols, and the separate identities religious communities developed by using their own specific forms of ritual and symbolisation. Case studies treat the British Isles and the broader European context. Among the key issues explored here are rituals in internal organisation, the symbolic use of space, architecture and art, symbolism in social interactions, and symbolic constructions of the past.

The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West

Daily Life in Late Medieval Monasteries selling of corrodies (an allowance of food, clothing, and shelter in a ... “Monasteries, Society and Reform in Late Medieval England,” in The Religious Orders in Pre-Reformation England, ed.

The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West

Monasticism, in all of its variations, was a feature of almost every landscape in the medieval West. So ubiquitous were religious women and men throughout the Middle Ages that all medievalists encounter monasticism in their intellectual worlds. While there is enormous interest in medieval monasticism among Anglophone scholars, language is often a barrier to accessing some of the most important and groundbreaking research emerging from Europe. The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West offers a comprehensive treatment of medieval monasticism, from Late Antiquity to the end of the Middle Ages. The essays, specially commissioned for this volume and written by an international team of scholars, with contributors from Australia, Belgium, Canada, England, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland, and the United States, cover a range of topics and themes and represent the most up-to-date discoveries on this topic.

The Clergy in the Medieval World

John Blair and Richard Sharpe (Leicester, 1992), 212–25; Sarah Foot, 'The role of the minster in earlier Anglo-Saxon society', in Monasteries and Society in Medieval Britain, ed. B. Thompson (Stamford, 1999), 35–58, esp.

The Clergy in the Medieval World

The first broad-ranging social history in English of the medieval secular clergy.

Heretics and Believers

David Knowles and R. Neville Hadcock, Medieval Religious Houses, England and Wales (Harlow, 1971). ... 1265–1540', in Benjamin Thompson, ed., Monasteries and Society in Medieval Britain (Stamford, 1999), 176–222; Knowles, Orders, 21–7; ...

Heretics and Believers

A sumptuously written people’s history and a major retelling and reinterpretation of the story of the English Reformation Centuries on, what the Reformation was and what it accomplished remain deeply contentious. Peter Marshall’s sweeping new history—the first major overview for general readers in a generation—argues that sixteenth-century England was a society neither desperate for nor allergic to change, but one open to ideas of “reform” in various competing guises. King Henry VIII wanted an orderly, uniform Reformation, but his actions opened a Pandora’s Box from which pluralism and diversity flowed and rooted themselves in English life. With sensitivity to individual experience as well as masterfully synthesizing historical and institutional developments, Marshall frames the perceptions and actions of people great and small, from monarchs and bishops to ordinary families and ecclesiastics, against a backdrop of profound change that altered the meanings of “religion” itself. This engaging history reveals what was really at stake in the overthrow of Catholic culture and the reshaping of the English Church.

Ramsey

In Sandra Cavallo and Lyndon Warner, eds., Widowhood in Medieval and Early Modern England. Harlow: Longman, 1999. Swanson, Heather. ... Monasteries and Society in Medieval Britain: Proceedings of the 1994 Harlaxton Symposium.

Ramsey

"The people of Ramsey included clerics, knights, and laborers, and their activities overlapped to the point that the infamous tripartite division of medieval society - into those who prayed, fought, and worked - becomes meaningless. The book also crosses chronological boundaries, moving through decades of rebellion, plague, demographic turnover, violence, bloodshed, and war, and ending with religious upheaval that spelled the death of the 600-year-old abbey and the intrusion of an ambitious new lay landlord with courtly connections."--BOOK JACKET.

Churchmen and Urban Government in Late Medieval Italy c 1200 c 1450

Moreover, secular prelates such as John Stratford, Thomas Arundel and Cardinal Henry Beaufort were among the most influential political actors in late medieval England.3 Internal monastic developments also contributed to the reduced ...

Churchmen and Urban Government in Late Medieval Italy  c 1200   c 1450

Why, when so driven by the impetus for autonomy, did the city elites of thirteenth-century Italy turn to men bound to religious orders whose purpose and reach stretched far beyond the boundaries of their often disputed territories? Churchmen and Urban Government in Late Medieval Italy, c.1200–c.1450 brings together a team of international contributors to provide the first comparative response to this pivotal question. Presenting a series of urban cases and contexts, the book explores the secular-religious boundaries of the period and evaluates the role of the clergy in the administration and government of Italy's city-states. With an extensive introduction and epilogue, it exposes for consideration the beginnings of the phenomenon, the varying responses of churchmen, the reasons why practices changed and how politics and religious identity relate to each other. This important new study has significant implications for our understanding of power, negotiation, bureaucracy and religious identity.

Population Welfare and Economic Change in Britain 1290 1834

The interpretations of the monastic data suggest that recruits to the urban monasteries would have encountered such a ... 'The almonry schools of the English monasteries c.1265–1540' in Monasteries and society in medieval Britain, ed.

Population  Welfare and Economic Change in Britain  1290 1834

Presents the latest research on the causes and consequences of British population change from the medieval period to the eve of the Industrial Revolution, in both town and countryside