Monopolies and Patents

Dr. Fox has decided views on the benefits which are conferred on the industrial and commercial life of a country and feels that if the history of monopolies were better understood, much of the antagonism against them would tend to disappear ...

Monopolies and Patents

Dr. Fox has decided views on the benefits which are conferred on the industrial and commercial life of a country and feels that if the history of monopolies were better understood, much of the antagonism against them would tend to disappear.

The English Patents of Monopoly

Reprint of the 1906 edition.

The English Patents of Monopoly

Reprint of the 1906 edition. This study of English monopolies is divided into two sections. The first is a political history of English monopolies from 1559 to 1640. The second looks the effect Royal licenses had on the organization and development of different industries. Enriched with 100 pages of source documents, this oft-cited treatise remains a standard work.

Monopolies and Patents a Study of the History and Future of the Patent Monopoly

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations.

Monopolies and Patents  a Study of the History and Future of the Patent Monopoly

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Patent Monopolies

Patent Monopolies


The Supreme Court and Patents and Monopolies

The papers in this collection are drawn from the annual The Supreme Court Review, which, since its inception in 1960, has been regarded by such legal scholars as Robert F. Drinnan, S. J., as "An indispensable, universally quoted work of the ...

The Supreme Court and Patents and Monopolies

The papers in this collection are drawn from the annual The Supreme Court Review, which, since its inception in 1960, has been regarded by such legal scholars as Robert F. Drinnan, S. J., as "An indispensable, universally quoted work of the highest scholarship regarding the world's most influential tribunal." Now some of the most important contributions to the Review have been brought together in paperback editions that focus on issues that are becoming increasingly relevant to the ordinary citizen's daily life.

Patents and Monopoly

Patents and Monopoly


The English Patents of Monopoly 1

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

The English Patents of Monopoly  1

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Patently Innovative

Patently innovative provides a review of the importance of traditional patent law and emerging linkage regulations for pharmaceutical products on the global stage, with a focus on the linkage regime in Canada.

Patently Innovative

Patently innovative provides a review of the importance of traditional patent law and emerging linkage regulations for pharmaceutical products on the global stage, with a focus on the linkage regime in Canada. The primary focus is on how innovation in the pharmaceutical sector can be strongly regulated and how government regulation can either stimulate or inhibit development of breakthrough products. Includes empirical research to relate innovation to drug law A multidisciplinary approach is taken, including the intersection of IP (intellectual property) law, drug law and innovation Discusses the impact of government regulation on firm innovation

Deadly Monopolies

Deadly Monopolies is a powerful, disturbing, and deeply researched book that illuminates this “life patent” gold rush and its harmful, and even lethal, consequences for public health.

Deadly Monopolies

From the award-winning author of Medical Apartheid, an exposé of the rush to own and exploit the raw materials of life—including yours. Think your body is your own to control and dispose of as you wish? Think again. The United States Patent Office has granted at least 40,000 patents on genes controlling the most basic processes of human life, and more are pending. If you undergo surgery in many hospitals you must sign away ownership rights to your excised tissues, even if they turn out to have medical and fiscal value. Life itself is rapidly becoming a wholly owned subsidiary of the medical- industrial complex. Deadly Monopolies is a powerful, disturbing, and deeply researched book that illuminates this “life patent” gold rush and its harmful, and even lethal, consequences for public health. It examines the shaky legal, ethical, and social bases for Big Pharma’s argument that such patents are necessary to protect their investments in new drugs and treatments, arguing that they instead stifle the research, competition, and innovation that can drive down costs and save lives. In opposing the commodification of the body, Harriet Washington provides a crucial human dimension to an often all-too-abstract debate. Like the bestseller The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, Deadly Monopolies reveals in shocking detail just how far the profit motive has encroached in colonizing human life and compromising medical ethics. It is sure to stir debate—and instigate change.

Medical Monopoly

Joseph M. Gabriel provides the first detailed history of patent and trademark law as it relates to the nineteenth-century pharmaceutical industry as well as a unique interpretation of medical ethics, therapeutic reform, and the efforts to ...

Medical Monopoly

During much of the nineteenth century, physicians and pharmacists alike considered medical patenting and the use of trademarks by drug manufacturers unethical forms of monopoly; physicians who prescribed patented drugs could be, and were, ostracized from the medical community. In the decades following the Civil War, however, complex changes in patent and trademark law intersected with the changing sensibilities of both physicians and pharmacists to make intellectual property rights in drug manufacturing scientifically and ethically legitimate. By World War I, patented and trademarked drugs had become essential to the practice of good medicine, aiding in the rise of the American pharmaceutical industry and forever altering the course of medicine. Drawing on a wealth of previously unused archival material, Medical Monopoly combines legal, medical, and business history to offer a sweeping new interpretation of the origins of the complex and often troubling relationship between the pharmaceutical industry and medical practice today. Joseph M. Gabriel provides the first detailed history of patent and trademark law as it relates to the nineteenth-century pharmaceutical industry as well as a unique interpretation of medical ethics, therapeutic reform, and the efforts to regulate the market in pharmaceuticals before World War I. His book will be of interest not only to historians of medicine and science and intellectual property scholars but also to anyone following contemporary debates about the pharmaceutical industry, the patenting of scientific discoveries, and the role of advertising in the marketplace.

Runner Up Patents

These runner-up patents may reduce the research incentives but we show that under very general conditions the benefits from increased competition on the product market will outweigh these potential costs and render the system socially ...

Runner Up Patents

Exclusive patents sacrifice product competition to provide firms incentives to innovate. We characterize an alternative mechanism whereby later inventors are allowed to share the patent if they discover within a certain time period of the first innovator. These runner-up patents may reduce the research incentives but we show that under very general conditions the benefits from increased competition on the product market will outweigh these potential costs and render the system socially beneficial. We thus prove that an efficient tradeoff between research incentives and deadweight loss can be achieved without granting monopolies. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the time window where later inventors can share the patent should become a new policy tool at the disposal of the designer. This instrument will be used in a socially optimal mix with the breadth and the length of the patent and could allow sorting between more or less efficient firms in a differentiated patent policy.

The English Patents of Monopoly

The English Patents of Monopoly

Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.