More Ghost Stories of an Antiquary

".".Then she passed on between the dark box-bushes, and, at a point just before the path debouched on the lawn, she stopped once again and considered the quiet evening landscape, and made a mental note that that must be the tower of one of ...

More Ghost Stories of an Antiquary

.".".Then she passed on between the dark box-bushes, and, at a point just before the path debouched on the lawn, she stopped once again and considered the quiet evening landscape, and made a mental note that that must be the tower of one of the Roothing churches that one caught on the sky-line. Then a bird (perhaps) rustled in the box-bush on her left, and she turned and started at seeing what at first she took to be a Fifth of November mask peeping out among the branches. She looked closer. It was not a mask. It was a face - large, smooth, and pink. She remembers the minute drops of perspiration which were starting from its forehead: she remembers how the jaws were clean-shaven and the eyes shut. She remembers also, and with an accuracy which makes the thought intolerable to her, how the mouth was open and a single tooth appeared below the upper lip. As she looked the face receded into the darkness of the bush. The shelter of the house was gained and the door shut before she collapsed.""

More Ghost Stories of an Antiquary A Collection of Ghostly Tales Fantasy and Horror Classics

We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions with a brand new introductory biography of the author.

More Ghost Stories of an Antiquary   A Collection of Ghostly Tales  Fantasy and Horror Classics

M. R. James was born in Kent, England in 1862. James came to writing fiction relatively late, not publishing his first collection of short stories - Ghost Stories of an Antiquary (1904) - until the age of 42. Modern scholars now see James as having redefined the ghost story for the 20th century and he is seen as the founder of the 'antiquarian ghost story'. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions with a brand new introductory biography of the author.

Ghost Stories of an Antiquary Part 2

Some later editions under the title Ghost Stories of an Antiquary contain it and the earlier Ghost Stories of an Antiquary in one volume. It was his second short story collection.

Ghost Stories of an Antiquary Part 2

More Ghost Stories is a horror short story collection by British writer M. R. James, published in 1911. Some later editions under the title Ghost Stories of an Antiquary contain it and the earlier Ghost Stories of an Antiquary in one volume. It was his second short story collection.

More Ghost Stories

Author Montague Rhodes James was a medieval scholar by training, and he was interested in the oral storytelling tradition that prevailed before the printed word took hold and gained worldwide popularity.

More Ghost Stories

Author Montague Rhodes James was a medieval scholar by training, and he was interested in the oral storytelling tradition that prevailed before the printed word took hold and gained worldwide popularity. His ghost stories were written to be read aloud in a group setting, but even if you dare to read them all alone, you'll appreciate their subtlety, elegance and slow building of suspense.

Ghost Stories of an Antiquary Part 2 More Ghost Stories

Some later editions under this title contain both the original collection and its successor, More Ghost Stories, combined in one volume. It was his first short story collection.

Ghost Stories of an Antiquary Part 2  More Ghost Stories

Ghost Stories of an Antiquary is a horror short story collection by British writer M. R. James, published in 1904. Some later editions under this title contain both the original collection and its successor, More Ghost Stories, combined in one volume. It was his first short story collection.

Ghost Stories of an Antiquary

At once true to their source and powerfully reimagined for a visual medium, Leah Moore and John Reppion's subtly crafted adaptations give a new lease of life to these classic stories of watchful guardians, architectural puzzles and ill ...

Ghost Stories of an Antiquary

M. R. James is the acknowledged master of the English ghost story. Disdaining gore in favour of atmosphere and suggestion, his enduring supernatural tales are masterpieces of understated horror. Ghost stories of an Antiquary, Volume 1 collects graphic retellings of four spine-chilling tales by the renowned medievalist and writer. At once true to their source and powerfully reimagined for a visual medium, Leah Moore and John Reppion's subtly crafted adaptations give a new lease of life to these classic stories of vanishing children, spectral works of art and vengeance from beyond the grave.

More Ghost Stories

The most popular horror book for individuals who are going to overcome fears.

More Ghost Stories

The most popular horror book for individuals who are going to overcome fears.

Ghost Stories of an Antiquary Part 2 More Ghost Stories

Two men in a smoking-room were talking of their private-school days.

Ghost Stories of an Antiquary Part 2  More Ghost Stories

Two men in a smoking-room were talking of their private-school days. 'At our school,' said A., 'we had a ghost's footmark on the staircase. What was it like? Oh, very unconvincing. Just the shape of a shoe, with a square toe, if I remember right. The staircase was a stone one. I never heard any story about the thing. That seems odd, when you come to think of it. Why didn't somebody invent one, I wonder?''You never can tell with little boys. They have a mythology of their own.There's a subject for you, by the way--"The Folklore of PrivateSchools".''Yes; the crop is rather scanty, though. I imagine, if you were to investigate the cycle of ghost stories, for instance, which the boys at private schools tell each other, they would all turn out to be highly-compressed versions of stories out of books.''Nowadays the Strand and Pearson's, and so on, would be extensively drawn upon.''No doubt: they weren't born or thought of in my time. Let's see. I wonder if I can remember the staple ones that I was told. First, there was the house with a room in which a series of people insisted on passing a night; and each of them in the morning was found kneeling in a corner, and had just time to say, "I've seen it," and died.'

More Ghost Stories

Montague Rhodes James (1862-1936), who published under the byline M. R. James, was a noted medieval scholar and provost of King's College, Cambridge (1905-1918) and of Eton College (1918- 1936), best remembered today for his ghost stories ...

More Ghost Stories

Montague Rhodes James (1862-1936), who published under the byline M. R. James, was a noted medieval scholar and provost of King s College, Cambridge (1905-1918) and of Eton College (1918- 1936), best remembered today for his ghost stories in the classic Victorian Yuletide vein. As a medieval scholar his output was phenomenal and remains highly respected in scholarly circles. His discovery of a manuscript fragment led to excavations in the ruins of the abbey at Bury St Edmunds, West Suffolk, in 1902, in which the graves of several twelfth-century abbots described by Jocelyn de Brakelond (a contemporary chronicler) were rediscovered, having been lost since the Dissolution. His ghost stories were published in a series of collections: Ghost Stories of an Antiquary (1904), More Ghost Stories (1911), A Thin Ghost and Others (1919) and A Warning to the Curious and Other Ghost Stories (1925). Other works include: Old Testament Legends (1913), Abbeys (1925), and Collected Ghost Stories (1931).

Ghost Stories of an Antiquary

An excellent popular book.

Ghost Stories of an Antiquary

An excellent popular book.

Ghost Stories of an Antiquary Part 2

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

Ghost Stories of an Antiquary Part 2

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Ghost Stories of an Antiquary

First published in the early 1900s, they have never been out of print, and are recognized as classics of the genre. This collection contains some of his most chilling tales, including

Ghost Stories of an Antiquary

M. R. James is widely regarded as the father of the modern ghost story, and his tales have influenced horror writers from H. P. Lovecraft to Stephen King. First published in the early 1900s, they have never been out of print, and are recognized as classics of the genre. This collection contains some of his most chilling tales, including

Ghost Stories of an Antiquary

""Number Thirteen,"" ""The Mezzotint,"" ""Canon Alberic's Scrapbook,"" more. Renowned for their wit, erudition and suspense, these stories are each masterfully constructed and represent a high achievement in the ghost genre.

Ghost Stories of an Antiquary

Ghost Stories of an Antiquary is the title of M. R. James' first collection of ghost stories, published in 1904 (some had previously appeared in magazines). Some later editions under this title contain both the original collection and its successor, More Ghost Stories (1911), combined in one volume. There are eight classics by great Edwardian scholar and storyteller. "Number Thirteen," "The Mezzotint," "Canon Alberic's Scrapbook," more. Renowned for their wit, erudition and suspense, these stories are each masterfully constructed and represent a high achievement in the ghost genre. Montague Rhodes James (1862–1936) was a medieval scholar; Provost of King's College, Cambridge. He wrote many of his ghost stories to be read aloud in the long tradition of spooky Christmas Eve tales. His stories often use rural settings, with a quiet, scholarly protagonist getting caught up in the activities of supernatural forces. The details of horror are almost never explicit, the stories relying on a gentle, bucolic background to emphasise the awfulness of the otherworldly intrusions. LOST HEARTS (excerpt) It was, as far as I can ascertain, in September of the year 1811 that a post-chaise drew up before the door of Aswarby Hall, in the heart of Lincolnshire. The little boy who was the only passenger in the chaise, and who jumped out as soon as it had stopped, looked about him with the keenest curiosity during the short interval that elapsed between the ringing of the bell and the opening of the hall door. He saw a tall, square, red-brick house, built in the reign of Anne; a stone-pillared porch had been added in the purer classical style of 1790; the windows of the house were many, tall and narrow, with small panes and thick white woodwork. A pediment, pierced with a round window, crowned the front. There were wings to right and left, connected by curious glazed galleries, supported by colonnades, with the central block. These wings plainly contained the stables and offices of the house. Each was surmounted by an ornamental cupola with a gilded vane. An evening light shone on the building, making the window-panes glow like so many fires. Away from the Hall in front stretched a flat park studded with oaks and fringed with firs, which stood out against the sky. The clock in the church-tower, buried in trees on the edge of the park, only its golden weather-cock catching the light, was striking six, and the sound came gently beating down the wind. It was altogether a pleasant impression, though tinged with the sort of melancholy appropriate to an evening in early autumn, that was conveyed to the mind of the boy who was standing in the porch waiting for the door to open to him. The post-chaise had brought him from Warwickshire, where, some six months before, he had been left an orphan. Now, owing to the generous offer of his elderly cousin, Mr Abney, he had come to live at Aswarby. The offer was unexpected, because all who knew anything of Mr Abney looked upon him as a somewhat austere recluse, into whose steady-going household the advent of a small boy would import a new and, it seemed, incongruous element. The truth is that very little was known of Mr Abney’s pursuits or temper. The Professor of Greek at Cambridge had been heard to say that no one knew more of the religious beliefs of the later pagans than did the owner of Aswarby. Certainly his library contained all the then available books bearing on the Mysteries, the Orphic poems, the worship of Mithras, and the Neo-Platonists. In the marble-paved hall stood a fine group of Mithras slaying a bull, which had been imported from the Levant at great expense by the owner. He had contributed a description of it to the Gentleman’s Magazine, and he had written a remarkable series of articles in the Critical Museum on the superstitions of the Romans of the Lower Empire. He was looked upon, in fine, as a man wrapped up in his books, and it was a matter of great surprise among his neighbours that he should ever have heard of his orphan cousin, Stephen Elliott, much more that he should have volunteered to make him an inmate of Aswarby Hall. Whatever may have been expected by his neighbours, it is certain that Mr Abney— the tall, the thin, the austere— seemed inclined to give his young cousin a kindly reception. The moment the front-door was opened he darted out of his study, rubbing his hands with delight...

Ghost Stories of an Antiquary

Two men in a smoking-room were talking of their private-school days.

Ghost Stories of an Antiquary

Two men in a smoking-room were talking of their private-school days. 'At our school, ' said A., 'we had a ghost's footmark on the staircase. What was it like? Oh, very unconvincing. Just the shape of a shoe, with a square toe, if I remember right. The staircase was a stone one. I never heard any story about the thing. That seems odd, when you come to think of it. Why didn't somebody invent one, I wonder?''You never can tell with little boys. They have a mythology of their own