Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo Saxon England

Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo-Saxon England sifts through the historical evidence to describe and analyze a world of violence and intrigue, where mothers needed to devise their own systems to protect, nurture, and teach their children.

Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo Saxon England

Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo-Saxon England sifts through the historical evidence to describe and analyze a world of violence and intrigue, where mothers needed to devise their own systems to protect, nurture, and teach their children. Mary Dockray-Miller casts a maternal eye on Bede, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, and Beowulf to reveal mothers who created rituals, genealogies, and institutions for their children and themselves. Little-known historical figures--queens, abbesses, and other noblewomen--used their power in court and convent to provide education, medical care, and safety for their children, showing us that mothers of a thousand years ago and mothers of today had many of the same goals and aspirations.

Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo Saxon England

practice.7There is more textual evidence available about spiritual motherhood than about actual motherhood, an imbalance that likely accounts for the usual critical focus on spiritual motherhood. In Anglo-Saxon studies specifically, ...

Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo Saxon England

Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo-Saxon England sifts through the historical evidence to describe and analyze a world of violence and intrigue, where mothers needed to devise their own systems to protect, nurture, and teach their children. Mary Dockray-Miller casts a maternal eye on Bede, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, and Beowulf to reveal mothers who created rituals, genealogies, and institutions for their children and themselves. Little-known historical figures - queens, abbesses, and other noblewomen - used their power in court and convent to provide education, medical care, and safety for their children, showing us that mothers of a thousand years ago and mothers of today had many of the same goals and aspirations.

Leaders of the Anglo Saxon Church

Dockray-Miller has convincingly argued that in Anglo-Saxon England this 'maternal work', as she describes it, ... and therefore that one does not need to have given birth to be a 'mother', are certainly borne out in Anglo-Saxon ...

Leaders of the Anglo Saxon Church

Essays bring out the important and complex roles played by Anglo-Saxon churchmen, including Bede and lesser-known figures.

Writing Women Saints in Anglo Saxon England

730); IV.19–20 Old English Bede (9th c.); IV.19 (21) Old English Martyrology (9th c.); ... See also Hollis, Anglo-Saxon Women; Dockray-Miller, Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo-Saxon England; and Lees and Overing, Double Agents.

Writing Women Saints in Anglo Saxon England

The twelve essays in this collection advance the contemporary study of the women saints of Anglo-Saxon England by challenging received wisdom and offering alternative methodologies. The work embraces a number of different scholarly approaches, from codicological study to feminist theory. While some contributions are dedicated to the description and reconstruction of female lives of saints and their cults, others explore the broader ideological and cultural investments of the literature. The volume concentrates on four major areas: the female saint in the Old English Martyrology, genre including hagiography and homelitic writing, motherhood and chastity, and differing perspectives on lives of virgin martyrs. The essays reveal how saints' lives that exist on the apparent margins of orthodoxy actually demonstrate a successful literary challenge extending the idea of a holy life.

Anglo Saxon England Volume 30

301-44 Dockray - Miller , Mary , Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo - Saxon England ( New York ) Donoghue , Daniel , ' Lady Godiva ' , Literary Appropriations of the Anglo - Saxons , ed . Scragg and Weinburg , pp .

Anglo Saxon England  Volume 30

This volume includes an important assessment of the correspondence of St Boniface.

Dress in Anglo Saxon England

... Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo-Saxon England, (Basingstoke and London, 2000). DODWELL, C. R., 'L'Originalité icongraphique de plusieursillustrations anglo-saxonnesdel'AncienTestament',Cahiersde civilisation médiévale, 14(1971), ...

Dress in Anglo Saxon England

Based on the revised and expanded edition of 2004, this paperback is an encyclopaedic study of English dress from the fifth to the eleventh centuries, drawing evidence from archaeology, text and art (manuscripts, ivories, metalwork, stone sculpture, mosaics), and also from re-enactors' experience. It examines archaeological textiles, cloth production and the significance of imported cloth and foreign fashions. Dress is discussed as a marker of gender, ethnicity, status and social role - in the context of a pagan burial, dress for holy orders, bequests of clothing, commissioning a kingly wardrobe, and much else - and surviving dress fasteners and accessories are examined with regard to type and to geographical/chronological distribution. There are colour reconstructions of early Anglo-Saxon dress and a cutting pattern for a gown from the Bayeux tapestry; Old English garment names are discussed, and there is a glossary of costume and other relevant terms. GALE OWEN-CROCKER is Professor of Anglo-Saxon Culture at the University of Manchester. She has a special interest in dress throughout the medieval period - she advises on dress entries to the Toronto Old English Dictionary and has consulted for many museums and television companies. She is co-editor of the journal Medieval Clothing and Textiles.

Early Medieval English Life Courses

The first leads to the second through pregnancy, a medically dangerous time for both mother and child. ... See also Mary Dockray-Miller, Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo-Saxon England (Basingstoke, 2000); Robin Smith, “Anglo-Saxon ...

Early Medieval English Life Courses

This volume captures the complexity and diversity of ideas surrounding the life course in early medieval English culture, with chapters ranging across the interconnected realms of language, culture, medicine, onomastics, literature and the material world.

Childhood Adolescence in Anglo Saxon Literary Culture

Those who listened to Old English texts may also be looked at anew within the contexts of their identities in a child-centred world. ... 57 See for example Mary Dockray-Miller, Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo-Saxon England, 77–116.

Childhood   Adolescence in Anglo Saxon Literary Culture

Childhood & Adolescence in Anglo-Saxon Literary Culture counters the generally received wisdom that early medieval childhood and adolescence were an unremittingly bleak experience. The contributors analyse representations of children and their education in Old English, Old Norse and Anglo-Latin writings, including hagiography, heroic poetry, riddles, legal documents, philosophical prose and elegies. Within and across these linguistic and generic boundaries some key themes emerge: the habits and expectations of name-giving, expressions of childhood nostalgia, the role of uneducated parents, and the religious zeal and rebelliousness of youth. After decades of study dominated by adult gender studies, Childhood & Adolescence in Anglo-Saxon Literary Culture rebalances our understanding of family life in the Anglo-Saxon era by reconstructing the lives of medieval children and adolescents through their literary representation.

Erotic Discourse and Early English Religious Writing

This absense of lactans imagery from Anglo-Saxon England is consistent with what Christine Fell notes as a general ... However, Mary Dockray Miller has recently argued to the contrary; see her Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo-Saxon ...

Erotic Discourse and Early English Religious Writing

Erotic Discourse and Early English Religious Writing discusses the role of sexuality in medieval devotional practice, looking in particular at religious writings circulating in England in the tenth to thirteenth centuries.

Mothers and Daughters

Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo-Saxon England. New York: St. Martin's. Giorgio, Adalgisia, ed. 2002. Writing Mothers and Daughters: Renegotiating the Mother in Western European Narratives by Women. New York: Berthahn Books.

Mothers and Daughters

Nationally and internationally known feminist scholars frame, analyze, and explore mother-daughter bonds in this collection of essays. Cultures from around the world are mined for insights which reveal historical, generational, ethnic, political, religious, and social class differences.

Mothers and Children

Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo-Saxon England (London, 2000). Douglas, Mary. Purity and Danger: An Analysis of the Concepts of Pollution and Taboo (London, 1989). Duby, Georges. Medieval Marriage: Two Models from Twelfth-Century ...

Mothers and Children

This book presents a synthetic history of the family--the most basic building block of medieval Jewish communities--in Germany and northern France during the High Middle Ages. Concentrating on the special roles of mothers and children, it also advances recent efforts to write a comparative Jewish-Christian social history. Elisheva Baumgarten draws on a rich trove of primary sources to give a full portrait of medieval Jewish family life during the period of childhood from birth to the beginning of formal education at age seven. Illustrating the importance of understanding Jewish practice in the context of Christian society and recognizing the shared foundations in both societies, Baumgarten's examination of Jewish and Christian practices and attitudes is explicitly comparative. Her analysis is also wideranging, covering nearly every aspect of home life and childrearing, including pregnancy, midwifery, birth and initiation rituals, nursing, sterility, infanticide, remarriage, attitudes toward mothers and fathers, gender hierarchies, divorce, widowhood, early education, and the place of children in the home, synagogue, and community. A richly detailed and deeply researched contribution to our understanding of the relationship between Jews and their non-Jewish neighbors, Mothers and Children provides a key analysis of the history of Jewish families in medieval Ashkenaz.

The Old English Version of Bede s Historia Ecclesiastica

Clare A. Lees and Gillian R. Overing, 'Birthing Bishops and Fathering Poets: Bede, Hild, and the Relations of Cultural Production,' Exemplaria 6 (1994), 35–65; Mary Dockray-Miller, Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo-Saxon England, ...

The Old English Version of Bede s Historia Ecclesiastica

Pioneering examination of the Old English version of Bede's Historia ecclesiastica and its reception in the middle ages, from a theoretically informed, multi-disciplinary perspective.

Vikings and the Vikings

Some studies have been published in the 21st century concerning motherhood in the Middle Ages but, ... cultural context made it possible for a work such as Mary Dochray-Miller's Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo-Saxon England to apply a ...

Vikings and the Vikings

This essay collection is a wide-ranging exploration of Vikings, the television series that has successfully summoned the historical world of the Norse people for modern audiences to enjoy. From a range of critical viewpoints, these all fresh essays explore the ways in which past and present representations of the Vikings converge in the show's richly textured dramatization of the rise and fall of Ragnar Loobrok--and the exploits of his heirs--creating what many viewers label a "true" representation of the age. From the show's sources in both saga literature and Victorian revival, to its engagement with contemporary concerns regarding gender, race and identity, via setting, sex, society and more, this first book-length study of the History Channel series appeals to fans of the show, Viking enthusiasts, and anyone with an interest in medievalist representation in the 21st century.

Misconceptions About the Middle Ages

Mary Dockray-Miller, Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo-Saxon England, New York: St. Martin's, 2000. Sean Gilsdorf (trans.), Queenship and Sanctity: The Lives of Mathilda and the Epi- taph ofAdelheid, Washington, DC: Catholic University ...

Misconceptions About the Middle Ages

Interest in the middle ages is at an all time high at the moment, thanks in part to ""The Da Vinci Code."" Never has there been a moment more propitious for a study of our misconceptions of the Middle Ages than now. Ranging across religion, art, and science, Misconceptions about the Middle Ages unravels some of the many misinterpretations that have evolved concerning the medieval period, including:the churchwarscienceartsocietyWith an impressive international array of contributions, the book will be essential readi.

Daily Life in Anglo Saxon England 2nd Edition

his inheritance from his mother. The mother was not present at the hearing, but Thurkil the White agreed to step forward to represent her. However, Thurkil claimed to know nothing of the case, so three thegns were sent off on a ...

Daily Life in Anglo Saxon England  2nd Edition

Daily Life in Anglo-Saxon England covers daily life in England from the 5th through the 11th centuries. These six centuries saw significant social, cultural, religious, and ethnic upheavals, from the introduction of Christianity, the creation of towns, the Viking invasions, the invention of "Englishness," and the Norman Conquest. In the last ten years, there have been significant new archaeological discoveries, major advances in scientific archaeology, and new ways of thinking about the past, meaning it is now possible to say much more about everyday life during this time period than ever before. Drawing on a combination of archaeological and textual evidence, including the latest scientific findings from DNA and stable isotope analysis, this book looks at the life course of the early medieval English from the cradle to the grave, and how daily lives changed over these centuries. Topics covered include maintenance activities, education, play, commerce, trade, manufacturing, fashion, travel, migration, warfare, health, and medicine.

Women of Power in Anglo Saxon England

acting as some form of regent during her son's minority and took a back seat when Bishop Æthelwold died and/or her son married for the first time.10 Was she initially content to live quietly, replaced in seniority by the mother of the ...

Women of Power in Anglo Saxon England

Women of Power in Anglo-Saxon England focuses on the lives of remarkable women: women who ruled and schemed, were peace-weavers and warriors. It explores – and restores – their reputations. Many Anglo-Saxon kings are familiar. Æthelred the Unready is one, yet less is written of his wife, who was consort of two kings and championed one of her sons over the others, or his mother who was an anointed queen and powerful regent, but was also accused of witchcraft and regicide. A royal abbess educated five bishops and was instrumental in deciding the date of Easter; another took on the might of Canterbury and Rome and was accused by the monks of fratricide. Anglo-Saxon women were prized for their bloodlines - one had such rich blood that it sparked a war - and one was appointed regent of a foreign country. Royal mothers wielded power; Eadgifu, wife of Edward the Elder, maintained a position of authority during the reigns of both her sons. Æthelflaed, Lady of the Mercians, was a queen in all but name, while few have heard of Queen Seaxburh, who ruled Wessex, or Queen Cynethryth, who issued her own coinage. She, too, was accused of murder, but was also, like many of the royal women, literate and highly-educated. From seventh-century Northumbria to eleventh-century Wessex and making extensive use of primary sources, Women of Power in Anglo-Saxon England examines the lives of individual women in a way that has often been done for the Anglo-Saxon men but not for their wives, sisters, mothers and daughters. It tells their stories: those who ruled and schemed, the peace-weavers and the warrior women, the saints and the sinners. It explores, and restores, their reputations.

The Cult of the Virgin Mary in Anglo Saxon England

82 Blessed mother of God , you are exalted above the choirs of angels to the celestial domains . 83 Rejoice and be glad , O blessed mother of God , who by your truly virginal hospitality obtained for us the favour of the Lord who is ...

The Cult of the Virgin Mary in Anglo Saxon England

This book provides a wide-ranging exploration of the cult in England from c. 700 to the Conquest. Dr Clayton describes and illustrates with a plate section the development of Marian devotion, discussing Anglo-Saxon feasts of the Virgin, liturgical texts, prayers, art, poetry and prose.

Women as Mothers in Pre Industrial England

Works on women which contain information on the role of mothers in pre-industrial England Andre, C. S. (1981) 'Some selected aspects of the role of women ... Fell, C. (1984) Women in Anglo-Saxon England and the Impact of 1066, London.

Women as Mothers in Pre Industrial England

Originally published in 1990, this book met the rising interest in the subject of women in pre-industrial England, bringing together a group of scholars with diverse and wide-ranging interests; experts in social and medical history, demography, women’s studies, and the history of the family, whose work would not normally appear in one volume. Key aspects of motherhood in pre-industrial society are discussed, including women’s concepts of maternity, the experience of pregnancy, childbirth, and wet nursing, the fostering and disciplining of children, and child abandonment and neglect. This unique book provides a comprehensive introductory overview of its subject, with emphasis on women’s experiences and motives.

Anglo Saxon England Volume 38

To the west was the one belonging to St Augustine's, Dodderhill, with an eastern boundary which can be reliably established, except in respect of Hadzor.54 To the north was Bromsgrove's mother-church parish, and to the east was ...

Anglo Saxon England  Volume 38

Anglo-Saxon England was the first publication to consistently embrace all the main aspects of study of Anglo-Saxon history and culture - linguistic, literary, textual, palaeographic, religious, intellectual, historical, archaeological and artistic - and which promotes the more unusual interests - in music or medicine or education, for example. Articles in volume 38 include: The Passio Andreae and The Dream of the Rood by Thomas D. Hill, Beowulf off the Map by Alfred Hiatt, Numerical Composition and Beowulf: A Re-consideration by Yvette Kisor, 'The Landed Endowment of the Anglo-Saxon Minster at Hanbury (Worcs.) by Steven Bassett, Scapegoating the Secular Clergy: The Hermeneutic Style as a Form of Monastic Self-Definition by Rebecca Stephenson, Understanding Numbers in MS London, British Library Harley by Daniel Anlezark, Tudor Antiquaries and the Vita 'dwardi Regis by Henry Summerso and Earl Godwine's Ship by Simon Keynes and Rosalind Love. A comprehensive bibliography concludes the volume, listing publications on Anglo-Saxon England during 2008.

The Culture of Translation in Anglo Saxon England

One day , when his mother was showing him and his brothers a certain English book of poetry which she held in her hand , she said : " Whichever of you can learn this book the quickest , I will give it to him .

The Culture of Translation in Anglo Saxon England

Most Old English literature was translated or adapted from Latin: what was translated, and when, reflects cultural development and the increasing respectability of English. Translation was central to Old English literature as we know it. Most Old English literature, in fact, was either translated or adapted from Latin sources, and this is the first full-length study of Anglo-Saxon translation as a cultural practice. This 'culture of translation' was characterised by changing attitudes towards English: at first a necessary evil, it can be seen developing increasing authority and sophistication. Translation's pedagogical function (already visible in Latin and Old English glosses) flourished in the centralizing translation programme of the ninth-century translator-king Alfred, and English translations of the Bible further confirmed the respectability ofEnglish, while Ælfric's late tenth-century translation theory transformed principles of Latin composition into a new and vigorous language for English preaching and teaching texts. The book will integrate the Anglo-Saxon period more fully into the longer history of English translation.ROBERT STANTON is Assistant Professor of English, Boston College, Massachusetts.