The Sacred in Music

Hope for Harmony In his essay " Music at Night , " Aldous Huxley reflects on musical bliss and mystical bliss as he ... or in any words : " Our own words " are inadequate even to express the meaning of other words ; how much more ...

The Sacred in Music

Religion and music are complementary resources for interpreting our lives. Music serves the sacred in ways that can be specified and articulated, yet the connection between them has been sorely neglected in the scholarly study of religion. In The Sacred in Music, Albert Blackwell brings the two subjects together in a celebration of the rich Western musical tradition, both classical and Christian.

Music at Night

Music at Night


Music at Night

Music at Night


Music at Night

Music at Night


Encyclopedia of the Essay

Essays and Related Prose On the Margin: Notes and Essays, 1923 Along the Road: Notes and Essays of a Tourist, 1925 Essays ... 1929 Music at Night, and Other Essays, 1931 The Olive Tree and Other Essays, 1936 Stories, Essays, and Poems, ...

Encyclopedia of the Essay

This groundbreaking new source of international scope defines the essay as nonfictional prose texts of between one and 50 pages in length. The more than 500 entries by 275 contributors include entries on nationalities, various categories of essays such as generic (such as sermons, aphorisms), individual major works, notable writers, and periodicals that created a market for essays, and particularly famous or significant essays. The preface details the historical development of the essay, and the alphabetically arranged entries usually include biographical sketch, nationality, era, selected writings list, additional readings, and anthologies

Psychedelic Prophets

“Morals, 1837.” Nash's Pall Mall Magazine, March 1937, 92–5. – Music at Night and Other Essays. London: Chatto and Windus, 1931. – “The Oddest Science.” Esquire, March 1957. In Complete Essays of Aldous Huxley, vol. 6, 1956–1963, ed.

Psychedelic Prophets

Aldous Huxley (1894–1963) was the author of nearly fifty books and numerous essays, best known for his dystopian novel Brave New World. Humphry Osmond (1917–2004) was a British-trained psychiatrist interested in the biological nature of mental illness and the potential for psychedelic drugs to treat psychoses, especially schizophrenia. In 1953, Huxley sent an appreciative note to Osmond about an article he and a colleague had published on their experiments with mescaline, which inspired an initial meeting and decade-long correspondence. This critical edition provides the complete Huxley-Osmond correspondence, chronicling an exchange between two brilliant thinkers who explored such subjects as psychedelics, the visionary experience, the nature of mind, human potentialities, schizophrenia, death and dying, Indigenous rituals and consciousness, socialism, capitalism, totalitarianism, power and authority, and human evolution. There are references to mutual friends, colleagues, and eminent figures of the day, as well as details about both men's personal lives. The letters bear witness to the development of mind-altering drugs aimed at discovering the mechanisms of mental illness and eventually its treatment. A detailed introduction situates the letters in their historical, social, and literary context, explores how Huxley and Osmond first coined the term "psychedelic," contextualizes their work in mid-century psychiatry, and reflects on their legacy as contributors to the science of mind-altering substances. Psychedelic Prophets is an extraordinary record of a full correspondence between two leading minds and a testament to friendship, intellectualism, empathy, and tolerance. The fact that these sentiments emerge so clearly from the letters, at a historical moment best known for polarizing ideological conflict, threats of nuclear war, and the rise of post-modernism, reveals much about the personalities of the authors and the persistence of these themes today.

Music in Our Lives

Lyrics have a distinct advantage over other types of linguistic expression. The placement of words in musical confinement ... Aldous Huxley, “The Rest is Silence,” in Music at Night and Other Essays (Leipzig: Albatross, 1931), 19. 2.

Music in Our Lives

Music research has entered something of a Golden Age. Technological advances and scholarly inquiry have merged in interdisciplinary studies—drawing on psychology, neuroscience, evolutionary biology, anthropology and other fields—that illuminate the musical nature of our species. This volume develops, supports and challenges that body of research, examining key issues in the field, such as the difficulty of writing about music, the formation of musical preferences, the emotional impact of musical sounds, the comparison of music and language, the impulse for making music and the connection between music and spirituality.

Twentieth Century Fiction

Essays New and Old. 1926. Jesting Pilate: The Diary of a Journey. 1926. Proper Studies. 1927. Do What You Will: Essays. 1929. Holy Face and Other Essays. 1929. Vulgarity in Literature: Digressions from a Theme. 1930. Music at Night and ...

Twentieth Century Fiction


New Essays on Hemingway s Short Fiction

Music at Night and Other Essays . London : Chatto & Windus , 1931 . Lawrence , D. H. Studies in Classic American Literature . London : Seltzer , 1923 . Lewis , Wyndham . " The Dumb Ox : A Study of Ernest Hemingway .

New Essays on Hemingway s Short Fiction

The introduction and four scholarly essays in this volume constitute an overview of Hemingway's career as a short story writer and offer an overview of practical problems involved in reading this work. The early short story Up in Michigan is explained in relation to the short story cycle In Our Time. Problems of narration are analysed in Now I Lay Me, an integral part of the famous Nick Adams stories. A detailed look at ecological and Native American backgrounds is presented in Fathers and Sons, in the collection Winner Take Nothing; and Snows of Kilimanjaro is examined from a postcolonial perspective. Also included is a selected bibliography designed to direct readers to the most valuable resources for the study of Hemingway's short fiction.

Claude Debussy and the Poets

Eliot , T. S. " The Music of Poetry . " On Poetry and Poets . ... Some Aspects of Word Treatment in the Music of William Byrd . " Musical Quarterly 55 ( 1969 ) : 45–64 . ... Music at Night and Other Essays . London : Chatto and Windus ...

Claude Debussy and the Poets

Paul Dukas wrote about Debussy that the strongest influence he experienced was that of the poets, not that of the musicians. This book undertakes to demonstrate that thesis by studying Debussy's settings of songs by Banville, Verlaine, Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Louÿs, and Debussy himself. A particular insight may be gained in the comparison of six poems by Verlaine set to music by both Fauré and Debussy. The book includes a poetic/musical analysis of Debussy's Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun, based on the poem by Mallarmé.

A Dictionary of Scientific Quotations

Music at Night and Other Essays 1931 (Harmondsworth: Penguin) p 162 Our ductless glands secrete among other things our moods, our aspirations, our philosophy of life. Music at Night and ...

A Dictionary of Scientific Quotations

Science affects us all-in the words of Albert Einstein, "The whole of science is nothing more than a refinement of everyday thinking." It is therefore fascinating to discover the thoughts of scientists, philosophers, humanists, poets, theologians, politicians, and other miscellaneous mortals on this most important of subjects. A Dictionary of Scientific Quotations is a personal selection of scientific quotations by Professor Alan L Mackay that includes graffiti, lines of song, proverbs, and poetry. Whether you believe that "All problems are finally scientific problems" (George Bernard Shaw) or that "Imagination is more important than knowledge" (Einstein), it is without doubt that "It is a good thing for an uneducated man to read books of quotations" (Churchill). You will be charmed and delighted by this collection and remember, "'Why,'" said the Dodo, "'the best way to explain it is to do it'" (Alice in Wonderland, Lewis Carroll).

The Marriage between Literature and Music

Songs of Innocence. New York: Dover Publications, Inc. Blake, William. 1994. Marriage of Heaven and Hell ... In Music at Night and Other Essays (1931) London: Chatto & Windus. Keats. John. 1973. Keats – Poetical Works. Ed. H. W. Garrod.

The Marriage between Literature and Music

Music and literature have often been interconnected through the centuries. This is an intellectual and spiritual marriage between two artistic worlds, which are both part of a creative system that lends voice to one another. As this book argues, while music is one single form of expression, literature can be expressed in the form of either poetry or prose. However, they find their apotheosis, their most natural relationship, when poetry is set to music, especially when it is lyrical and has similar phrasing and rhythms to music. The book, thus, shows that music offers an additional perspective to literature, while the latter gives words to the feelings that the former arouses. As such, though both can stand alone, if put together, they form a complementary entity that everybody can enjoy.

Rival Sisters Art and Music at the Birth of Modernism 1815 915

Translated by Geoffrey Payzant as On the Musically Beautiful: A Contribution towards the Revision of the Aesthetics of Music. Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Company, 1986. Huxley, Aldous. Music at Night and Other Essays.

 Rival Sisters  Art and Music at the Birth of Modernism  1815 915

Introducing the concept of music and painting as 'rival sisters' during the nineteenth century, this interdisciplinary collection explores the productive exchange-from rivalry to inspiration to collaboration-between the two media in the age of Romanticism and Modernism. The volume traces the relationship between art and music, from the opposing claims for superiority of the early nineteenth century, to the emergence of the concept of synesthesia around 1900. This collection puts forward a more complex history of the relationship between art and music than has been described in earlier works, including an intermixing of models and distinctions between approaches to them. Individual essays from art history, musicology, and literature examine the growing influence of art upon music, and vice versa, in the works of Berlioz, Courbet, Manet, Fantin-Latour, Rodin, Debussy, and the Pre-Raphaelites, among other artists.

A Dictionary of Writers and their Works

The Cicadas, and Other Poems (1931) Poetry Music at Night, and Other Essays (1931) Non-Fiction Brave New World (1932) Fiction Eyeless in Gaza (1936) Fiction The Olive Tree, and Other Essays (1936) Non-Fiction After Many a Summer [US: ...

A Dictionary of Writers and their Works

Over 3,200 entries An essential guide to authors and their works that focuses on the general canon of British literature from the fifteenth century to the present. There is also some coverage of non-fiction such as biographies, memoirs, and science, as well as inclusion of major American and Commonwealth writers. This online-exclusive new edition adds 60,000 new words, including over 50 new entries dealing with authors who have risen to prominence in the last five years, as well as fully updating the entries that currently exist. Each entry provides details of a writer's nationality and birth/death dates, followed by a listing of their titles arranged chronologically by date of publication.

Catalog of Copyright Entries New Series

( 31–15722 ) 6095 Huxley , Aldous Leonard , 1894 Music at night and other essays , by Aldous Huxley . New York , The Fountain press ; London , Chatto & Windus , 1931 . 146 p . , 1l . 22cm “ This first edition of Music at night and other ...

Catalog of Copyright Entries  New Series


In Vivo

On the Musically Beautiful: A Contribution Towards the Revision of the Aesthetics of Music. Translated and edited by ... In In the Age of Prose: Literary and Philosophical Essays, 193–213. ... In Music at Night and Other Essays, 28–34.

In Vivo

The course of human life, punctuated by unexpected and transformative moments, is never uniform. What are the characteristics of such life-defining moments, what responses do they evoke, and how do they transform the lives of those who experience them? In Vivo explores foundational questions and pivotal moments of the human experience – engagement with a foreign culture, the decision to break free from unfortunate experiences, a generous action undertaken in the context of an otherwise regular day – in terms of their life-altering potential. Through illustrative examples, both real and fictional, Csepregi reveals the primacy of personal feelings in shaping human life and demonstrates the formative power of spontaneity outside the traditional context of formal education. These moments, and particularly the way they disrupt ordinary temporal order, Csepregi argues, are the lived experiences of our vitality. In an age marked by increasing anxiety about the homogenizing tendencies of contemporary life, In Vivo is timely and revelatory. Informed by a range of philosophical thinking and examples from art, music, and literature, it illustrates opportunities for meaningful reflection that are available to everyone, and urges the reader to engage with them.

The New Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature

Music at night , and other essays . 1931 , New York 1931 . ... 1931 , Garden City NY Chapman , J. B. Genealogy of Huxley and some others . 1931 . ... Essay on logiciens , Paris 1935 ; tr 1935 ( as Prophets and poets ) . reading .

The New Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature

More than fifty specialists have contributed to this new edition of volume 4 of The Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature. The design of the original work has established itself so firmly as a workable solution to the immense problems of analysis, articulation and coordination that it has been retained in all its essentials for the new edition. The task of the new contributors has been to revise and integrate the lists of 1940 and 1957, to add materials of the following decade, to correct and refine the bibliographical details already available, and to re-shape the whole according to a new series of conventions devised to give greater clarity and consistency to the entries.

Utopias and Dystopias in the Fiction of H G Wells and William Morris

'The New Romanticism', in Aldous Huxley, Music at Night and Other Essays including 'Vulgarity in Literature' (London: Chatto & Windus, 1949), pp. 211–220. ———, 'Notes on Liberty and the Boundaries of the Promised Land', in Huxley, ...

Utopias and Dystopias in the Fiction of H  G  Wells and William Morris

This book is about the fiercely contrasting visions of two of the nineteenth century’s greatest utopian writers. A wide-ranging, interdisciplinary study, it emphasizes that space is a key factor in utopian fiction, often a barometer of mankind’s successful relationship with nature, or an indicator of danger. Emerging and critically acclaimed scholars consider the legacy of two great utopian writers, exploring their use of space and time in the creation of sites in which contemporary social concerns are investigated and reordered. A variety of locations is featured, including Morris’s quasi-fourteenth century London, the lush and corrupted island, a routed and massacred English countryside, the high-rises of the future and the vertiginous landscape of another Earth beyond the stars.

Ineffability An Exercise in Comparative Philosophy of Religion

Chopin: The man and his music. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. Huxley, Aldous. 1970. The rest is silence. [1931]. In Music at night and other essays, 17–29. Freeport: Books for Libraries Press. Jankélévitch, Vladimir. 2003. Music and ...

Ineffability  An Exercise in Comparative Philosophy of Religion

This collection of essays is an exercise in comparative philosophy of religion that explores the different ways in which humans express the inexpressible. It brings together scholars of over a dozen religious, literary, and artistic traditions, as part of The Comparison Project's 2013-15 lecture and dialogue series on "religion beyond words." Specialist scholars first detailed the grammars of ineffability in nine different religious traditions as well as the adjacent fields of literature, poetry, music, and art. The Comparison Project's directors then compared this diverse set of phenomena, offering explanations for their patterning, and raising philosophical questions of truth and value about religious ineffability in comparative perspective. This book is the inaugural publication of The Comparison Project, an innovative new approach to the philosophy of religion housed at Drake University (Des Moines, Iowa, USA). The Comparison Project organizes a biennial series of scholar lectures, practitioner dialogues, and comparative panels about core, cross-cultural topics in the philosophy of religion. Specialist scholars of religion first explore this topic in their religions of expertise; comparativist philosophers of religion then raise questions of meaning, truth, and value about this topic in comparative perspective. The Comparison Project stands apart from traditional approaches to the philosophy of religion in its commitment to religious inclusivity. It is the future of the philosophy of religion in a diverse, global world.

Voices in the Whirlwind and other Essays

The Fabric of African Cultures The music floats in the night across the vast complex of African townships (or “locations” as they are called in South Africa). It is heard in all parts of this black metropolis because it is a loud and ...

Voices in the Whirlwind and other Essays