My Baby Got the Yips

The Random Thoughts of an Unprofessional Golfer

My Baby Got the Yips

He is not a pro golfer. Nor a successful amateur. Nor a respected writer on the game. Richard Russell is just an ordinary golfer. A chunky underachiever, whose only claim to fame is that he never, ever wears a sweater. Part autobiography, part theory, part bumper book of fun, this book is concerned with rarely pondered matters—the best way to throw a golf club, the greatest golfer you’ve never heard of, the 10 most marvelous golfing moments, and the secret of golf.

Hacked Off

One Man's All Or Nothing Bid to Crack the Secret of Golf

Hacked Off

Golf had never made sense to Tony Lawrence. It didn’t make sense to his wife or their six-year-old daughter either – not that they’d ever been foolish enough to try and play it.Then, fast approaching his 50th birthday, he found himself laid low with Post-Viral Fatigue, made redundant, newly cast as a house husband and - the final straw -humiliated over 18 holes by his 13-year-old nephew.So he set himself an ultimatum: 12 months to discover the secret of golf or give up for good. This is the story of the year that followed; of how one of life’s Mr Averages, a stone or two overweight, committed to crisps, chocolate biscuits and the odd glass of wine as part of a balanced diet and, like most bad golfers, believing in fairies and the power of miracles, pursues his chosen Holy Grail – to play a couple of rounds in single figures and, in glorious culmination, to beat his three brothers for the very first time, not to mention that diabolic nephew with the glinting teeth braces. If only finishing the ironing, baking an edible broccoli soufflé for dinner and understanding the workings of his daughter’s mind were as easy. His quest takes him further afield than he could ever have anticipated. How can it possibly be so difficult to fix a golf swing? (Soon he is two-timing his swing teacher). Do club manufacturers sell us sets of clubs to improve our game or just to bolster their profits? How on earth did that session of hypnotherapy in a deep squishy armchair lead immediately to the best round of his life? And why is it that his young daughter confuses ‘Brazil’ with ‘Walnut’ in her geography homework?He learns booming drives from one of England’s long-driving champions, receives a trenchant talking-to from ex-British Open champion Vivien Saunders and stands on thermographic ‘force plates’ to have all 28 parameters of his putting stroke dissected by computer. His marriage survives, despite the holes he gouges in the lounge carpet.The result is a funny, frank and touching testimony of one man’s attempts to master an art, and as near as any sane person has come to the secret of the elusive, maddening, impossible game of golf. But, as we leave him at the moment of truth, standing over a five-foot putt for that final climactic match, muttering, ‘Hole this and I’ll carry on playing, miss it and I give up…,’ you don’t have to be interested in golf to find Hacked Off an intriguing exploration of the place of sport in life, and of how our drives sometime land in areas quite different from where we’d been aiming. His daughter, incidentally, came up with the rather good subtitle.

The Flatlanders

Now It's Now Again

The Flatlanders

A group of three friends who made music in a house in Lubbock, Texas, recorded an album that wasn't released and went their separate ways into solo careers. That group became a legend and then—twenty years later—a band. The Flatlanders—Joe Ely, Jimmie Dale Gilmore, and Butch Hancock—are icons in American music, with songs blending country, folk, and rock that have influenced a long list of performers, including Robert Earl Keen, the Cowboy Junkies, Ryan Bingham, Terry Allen, John Hiatt, Hayes Carll, Lucinda Williams, Steve Earle, and Lyle Lovett. In The Flatlanders: Now It's Now Again, Austin author and music journalist John T. Davis traces the band's musical journey from the house on 14th Street in Lubbock to their 2013 sold-out concert at Carnegie Hall. He explores why music was, and is, so important in Lubbock and how earlier West Texas musicians such as Buddy Holly and Roy Orbison, as well as a touring Elvis Presley, inspired the young Ely, Gilmore, and Hancock. Davis vividly recreates the Lubbock countercultural scene that brought the Flatlanders together and recounts their first year (1972–1973) as a band, during which they recorded the songs that, decades later, were released as the albums More a Legend Than a Band and The Odessa Tapes. He follows the three musicians through their solo careers and into their first decade as a (re)united band, in which they cowrote songs for the first time on the albums Now Again and Hills and Valleys and recovered their extraordinary original demo tape, lost for forty years. Many roads later, the Flatlanders are finally both a legend and a band.

Traes

Traes

After eons of imposing his will upon the universe a very powerful and aging wizard named Phet, terrified of being unable to escape his own mortality, seeks to appoint an heir worthy to succeed him. In Traes – Wizards and Kings, Phet enlists the disturbing guidance of his creator, an immortal sorcerer named Laus-Jamas, who is the oldest living being alive; however, this turns out to be much more unsettling and ruthless than either of them would have guessed. As the monarchs of a planet called Traes endure extraordinary, often brutal tests to prove themselves worthy to succeed Phet, the mighty Laus-Jamas silently hones his own deadly agenda in a vexing war he has secretly declared on his insane protégé. This tale concludes in the second book of this series: Traes - Castles and War.

Going to the Dogs

An Incredible True Story

Going to the Dogs

Think you know your animal friends? The author did too. Then she met Laura Stinchfield, who calls herself The Pet Psychic, and her world became enriched in ways she never knew were possible. You will meet Kundun, selfless, big-hearted pit bull-greyhound rescue, Genji, a spirited Paso Fino gelding, rambunctious Rasa and shy, abused Tara, Catahoula Leopard Hound sisters who tell their stories in their own words with the help of animal communicator, Laura, and their mom. The journey begins with a move from the wilds of northern New Mexico to the Ojai Valley in California. Experience this family’s joy, pain, love, loss and the author’s odyssey of caring for them as all age and confront their limitations, traumas, hopes, dreams and absolute devotion to each other. You will cry. You will laugh. And you will never think about animals in the same way again. The sudden illness and untimely death of a member of this animal family leads to conversations on the Other Side and introduces the reader to an alternate reality so surprising that it may completely change whatever one believes Heaven is.

Dark Places

Dark Places

A Killer's Tracks. . . Missouri detective Claire Morgan is eager to get back to work after recuperating from injuries sustained on her last job. But the missing persons case that welcomes her home in the dead of winter soon turns more twisted and treacherous than Lake of the Ozarks' icy mountain roads. . . Can Only Lead. . . The woman's body is found suspended from a tree overlooking a local school. She is bleeding from the head, still alive--but not for long. Someone wanted Professor Simone Classon to suffer as much as possible before she died, making sure the victim had a perfect view of her colleagues and students on the campus below as she succumbed to the slow-working poison in her veins. . . To Dark Places. . . Frigid temperatures and punishing snows only make the investigation more difficult. And then the death threats begin--unnerving incidents orchestrated to send Claire a deadly message. Now, as she edges closer to the truth, Claire risks becoming entangled in a maniac's web--and the stuff of her own worst nightmares. . .

The Ghost of Pompeii

The Ghost of Pompeii

Erin Lewiss Bio For The Ghosts of Pompeii. Erin Lewis has lived in a dozen different towns in the last ten years. He spends most of his time in the Pacific Northwest. He resigned his commission in the Oregon National Guard in 2006. He mistrusts the government. Summary Larry has a gift. But, hes not sure how to use it. He wants to do whats right, but when youre a kid, its hard to know exactly what that is. Larry will have a rendezvous with Midas, and an unknown force, in a long forgotten city.

Farewell, My Subaru

One Man's Search for Happiness Living Green Off the Grid

Farewell, My Subaru

Advance praise for Farewell, My Subaru “Fine is Bryson Funny.” ——Santa Cruz Sentinel “Fine is an amiable and self-deprecating storyteller in the mold of Douglas Adams. If you're a fan of Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy-style humor -- and also looking to find out how to raise your own livestock to feed your ice-cream fetish -- Farewell may prove a vital tool.” —— The Washington Post “Fine is an eco-hero for our time..” —— Miami Herald “An afterward offers solid advice and sources for learning more.” —— On Earth Magazine, Natural Resources Defense Fund “This is Green Acres for the smart set—: a witty and educational look at sustainable living. Buy it, read it, compost it.” –A. J. Jacobs, author of The Year of Living Biblically “The details of Doug Fine’s experiment in green living are great fun——but more important is the spirit, the dawning understanding that living in connection to something more tangible than a computer mouse is what we were built for. It’ll make you want to move!” –Bill McKibben, author of Deep Economy: The Wealth of Communities and the Durable Future Like many Americans, Doug Fine enjoys his creature comforts, but he also knows full well they keep him addicted to oil. So he wonders: Is it possible to keep his Netflix and his car, his Wi-Fi and his subwoofers, and still reduce his carbon footprint? In an attempt to find out, Fine up and moves to a remote ranch in New Mexico, where he brazenly vows to grow his own food, use sunlight to power his world, and drive on restaurant grease. Never mind that he’s never raised so much as a chicken or a bean. Or that he has no mechanical or electrical skills. Whether installing Japanese solar panels, defending the goats he found on Craigslist against coyotes, or co-opting waste oil from the local Chinese restaurant to try and fill the new “veggie oil” tank in his ROAT (short for Ridiculously Oversized American Truck), Fine’s extraordinary undertaking makes one thing clear: It ain’t easy being green. In fact, his journey uncovers a slew of surprising facts about alternative energy, organic and locally grown food, and climate change. Both a hilarious romp and an inspiring call to action, Farewell, My Subaru makes a profound statement about trading today’s instant gratifications for a deeper, more enduring kind of satisfaction. From the Hardcover edition.

The New Unity

The New Unity