My Book of Telling Time.

My Book of Telling Time.

The second book in the Telling Time sequence helps children learn how to develop their time-telling skills by including minutes. By using a variety of different activities to keep children engaged, this workbook helps children learn this difficult skill without feeling frustrated or anxious.

My Book of Easy Telling Time

Learning about Hours and Half-Hours

My Book of Easy Telling Time

Outlines a step-by-step approach to telling time that concentrates first on hours before progressing to half- and quarter-hours, enabling children to gain confidence while improving their general understanding of numbers. Original.

My First Montessori Book of Telling Time

My First Montessori Book of Telling Time

While telling time is not an official subject in the Primary Montessori curriculum, it is an essential lifelong skill that is woven into daily activities in the Casa, or classroom for three to six year old children. An at-home supplement to exercises in the Casa, My First Montessori Book of Telling Time provides isolated images of clocks and their corresponding written times as well as strategies for parents to promote learning readiness in their children. Written and illustrated by AMI Primary Diploma holder Mary Da Prato, My First Montessori Book of Telling Time features calibrated drawings that accurately reflect the positions of the hour and minute hands of a clock every minute from twelve o'clock through one o'clock, and every fifteen minutes from one-fifteen through eleven forty-five. Longhand and digital transcriptions of time accompany each illustration.

Telling Time

Telling Time

Time isn't an easy concept for kids to grasp, but young readers will delight in learning all about it with the fun and lively lessons in TELLING TIME. Exploring what time is and discovering why we need to tell time, young readers certainly learn more than 'the big hand is on the one and the little hand is on the two'. With the help of a whole lot of clocks, a dash of humor, and a few familiar circumstances, learning to tell time is a lot of fun. It's about time. With Megan Halsey's fresh, fun, and playful illustrations, telling time is a breeze. Imaginative digital and analog clocks adorn page after page with cuckoos, in the shape of boats, with alarm bells, and more. You won't want to miss a second of Telling Time.

My First Picture Book of Telling the Time

My First Picture Book of Telling the Time

A group of children awake, hurry off to school, and participate in a number of activities while an accompanying clock face indicates the time of day.

Jake Goes to Soccer Practice

A Book about Telling Time

Jake Goes to Soccer Practice

Introduces readers to Jake's day going to soccer practice. Discusses the concept of telling time by showing how Jake reads his watch to tell his dad when to pick him up from practice. Additional features to aid comprehension include vivid photographs, Extended Learning activities, a phonetic glossary, and sources for further research.

Telling Time

Clocks, Diaries, and English Diurnal Form, 1660-1785

Telling Time

Describes changes in clock technology and the measurement of time and its effect on prose literature.

The Book of Telling

Tracing the Secrets of My Father's Lives

The Book of Telling

Sharona Ben-Tov Muir discovered after the death of her father, inventor and New Age guru Itzhak Bentov, that he had created Israel’s first rocket. A secret group of scientists working in a rooftop shed, the “Science Corps,” of which he was a part, invented weapons during Israel’s war of independence and later developed Israel’s nuclear resources and other major scientific projects. Bentov, however, settled in Boston and made his fortune with such medical inventions as a cardiac catheter, which he created in his home laboratory, where Muir played as a child. Haunted by the question of why her father had never discussed his past, Muir traveled to Israel to find the Corps. Through her own memories and the memories they share, Muir comes to know the brilliant, impassioned, and creative young Bentov as he demonstrates his latest invention for her, takes her canoeing, and reveals his thoughts about consciousness and the cosmos. Muir elegantly evokes the hubbub of Jerusalem streets, the wartime adventures of her hosts, and the inner lives of Israelis. The resulting story of invention and self-invention, of the Corps’s wartime experience as told for the first time, and of a deep, abiding love between father and daughter is an incandescent memoir. The author provides a new preface for this new Bison Books edition.