My Life as a Night Elf Priest

What gives this book its value are its unexpected gems of rare and beautifully detailed research on less sensationalized topics of interest such as the World of Warcraft player community in China, game modding, the increasingly blurred line ...

My Life as a Night Elf Priest

"Ever since the creators of the animated television show South Park turned their lovingly sardonic gaze on the massively multiplayer online game World of Warcraft for an entire episode, WoW's status as an icon of digital culture has been secure. My Life as a Night Elf Priest digs deep beneath the surface of that icon to explore the rich particulars of the World of Warcraft player's experience." —Julian Dibbell, Wired "World of Warcraft is the best representative of a significant new technology, art form, and sector of society: the theme-oriented virtual world. Bonnie Nardi's pioneering transnational ethnography explores this game both sensitively and systematically using the methods of cultural anthropology and aesthetics with intensive personal experience as a guild member, media teacher, and magical quest Elf." —William Sims Bainbridge, author of The Warcraft Civilization and editor of Online Worlds “Nardi skillfully covers all of the hot button issues that come to mind when people think of video games like World of Warcraft such as game addiction, sexism, and violence. What gives this book its value are its unexpected gems of rare and beautifully detailed research on less sensationalized topics of interest such as the World of Warcraft player community in China, game modding, the increasingly blurred line between play and work, and the rich and fascinating lives of players and player cultures. Nardi brings World of Warcraft down to earth for non-players and ties it to social and cultural theory for scholars. . . . the best ethnography of a single virtual world produced so far.” —Lisa Nakamura, University of Illinois World of Warcraft rapidly became one of the most popular online world games on the planet, amassing 11.5 million subscribers—officially making it an online community of gamers that had more inhabitants than the state of Ohio and was almost twice as populous as Scotland. It's a massively multiplayer online game, or MMO in gamer jargon, where each person controls a single character inside a virtual world, interacting with other people's characters and computer-controlled monsters, quest-givers, and merchants. In My Life as a Night Elf Priest, Bonnie Nardi, a well-known ethnographer who has published extensively on how theories of what we do intersect with how we adopt and use technology, compiles more than three years of participatory research in Warcraft play and culture in the United States and China into this field study of player behavior and activity. She introduces us to her research strategy and the history, structure, and culture of Warcraft; argues for applying activity theory and theories of aesthetic experience to the study of gaming and play; and educates us on issues of gender, culture, and addiction as part of the play experience. Nardi paints a compelling portrait of what drives online gamers both in this country and in China, where she spent a month studying players in Internet cafes. Bonnie Nardi has given us a fresh look not only at World of Warcraft but at the field of game studies as a whole. One of the first in-depth studies of a game that has become an icon of digital culture, My Life as a Night Elf Priest will capture the interest of both the gamer and the ethnographer. Bonnie A. Nardi is an anthropologist by training and a professor in the Department of Informatics in the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences at the University of California, Irvine. Her research focus is the social implications of digital technologies. She is the author of A Small Matter of Programming: Perspectives on End User Computing and the coauthor of Information Ecologies: Using Technology with Heart and Acting with Technology: Activity Theory and Interaction Design. Cover art by Jessica Damsky

Gaming at the Edge

Eladhari, “The Player's Journey”; Mortensen, “Mutual Fantasy Online”; Chee, Vieta, and Smith, “Online Gaming”; Taylor, Play between Worlds; Yee, “The Norranthian Scrolls”; Nardi, My Life as a Night Elf Priest; Pearce, Communities of ...

Gaming at the Edge

Video games have long been seen as the exclusive territory of young, heterosexual white males. In a media landscape dominated by such gamers, players who do not fit this mold, including women, people of color, and LGBT people, are often brutalized in forums and in public channels in online play. Discussion of representation of such groups in games has frequently been limited and cursory. In contrast, Gaming at the Edge builds on feminist, queer, and postcolonial theories of identity and draws on qualitative audience research methods to make sense of how representation comes to matter. In Gaming at the Edge, Adrienne Shaw argues that video game players experience race, gender, and sexuality concurrently. She asks: How do players identify with characters? How do they separate identification and interactivity? What is the role of fantasy in representation? What is the importance of understanding market logic? In addressing these questions Shaw reveals how representation comes to matter to participants and offers a perceptive consideration of the high stakes in politics of representation debates. Putting forth a framework for talking about representation, difference, and diversity in an era in which user-generated content, individualized media consumption, and the blurring of producer/consumer roles has lessened the utility of traditional models of media representation analysis, Shaw finds new insight on the edge of media consumption with the invisible, marginalized gamers who are surprising in both their numbers and their influence in mainstream gamer culture.

Respawn

... Play between Worlds; Boellstorff, Coming of Age in Second Life; Nardi, My Life as a Night Elf Priest; Corneliussen and Rettberg, Digital Culture, Play, and Identity; and Mark Chen, Leet Noobs. In many instances, as we have seen, ...

Respawn

In Respawn Colin Milburn examines the connections between video games, hacking, and science fiction that galvanize technological activism and technological communities. Discussing a wide range of games, from Portal and Final Fantasy VII to Super Mario Sunshine and Shadow of the Colossus, Milburn illustrates how they impact the lives of gamers and non-gamers alike. They also serve as resources for critique, resistance, and insurgency, offering a space for players and hacktivist groups such as Anonymous to challenge obstinate systems and experiment with alternative futures. Providing an essential walkthrough guide to our digital culture and its high-tech controversies, Milburn shows how games and playable media spawn new modes of engagement in a computerized world.

The Routledge Handbook of Language and Digital Communication

... My life as a night elf priest: an anthropological account of World of Warcraft, University of Michigan Press: Ann Arbor, MI. Newon, L. 2014, 'Discourses of connectedness: globalisation, digital media, and the language of community', ...

The Routledge Handbook of Language and Digital Communication

The Routledge Handbook of Language and Digital Communication provides a comprehensive, state of the art overview of language-focused research on digital communication, taking stock and registering the latest trends that set the agenda for future developments in this thriving and fast moving field. The contributors are all leading figures or established authorities in their areas, covering a wide range of topics and concerns in the following seven sections: • Methods and Perspectives; • Language Resources, Genres, and Discourses; • Digital Literacies; • Digital Communication in Public; • Digital Selves and Online-Offline Lives; • Communities, Networks, Relationships; • New debates and Further directions. This volume showcases critical syntheses of the established literature on key topics and issues and, at the same time, reflects upon and engages with cutting edge research and new directions for study (as emerging within social media). A wide range of languages are represented, from Japanese, Greek, German and Scandinavian languages, to computer-mediated Arabic, Chinese and African languages. The Routledge Handbook of Language and Digital Communication will be an essential resource for advanced undergraduates, postgraduates and researchers within English language and linguistics, applied linguistics and media and communication studies.

Internet and Emotions

Henderson, S. and Gilding, M. (2004) “I've Never Clicked This Much With Any- one in My Life”: Trust and Hyperpersonal ... 2012 from http://www.ascusc.org/jcmc/vol3/issue2/lombard.html Nardi, B. (2010) My Life as a Night Elf Priest: ...

Internet and Emotions

Nothing seems more far removed from the visceral, bodily experience of emotions than the cold, rational technology of the Internet. But as this collection shows, the internet and emotions intersect in interesting and surprising ways. Internet and Emotions is the fruit of an interdisciplinary collaboration of scholars from the sociology of emotions and communication and media studies. It features theoretical and empirical chapters from international researchers who investigate a wide range of issues concerning the sociology of emotions in the context of new media. The book fills a substantial gap in the social research of digital technology, and examines whether the internet invokes emotional states differently from other media and unmediated situations, how emotions are mobilized and internalized into online practices, and how the social definitions of emotions are changing with the emergence of the internet. It explores a wide range of behaviors and emotions from love to mourning, anger, resentment and sadness. What happens to our emotional life in a mediated, disembodied environment, without the bodily element of physical co-presence to set off emotional exchanges? Are there qualitatively new kinds of emotional exchanges taking place on the internet? These are only some of the questions explored in the chapters of this book, with quite surprising answers.

Methods for Studying Video Games and Religion

Nardi, B. (2010) My Life as a Night Elf Priest: An Anthropological Account of the World of Warcraft, Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. New York Times (2009) 'Is That an Emoticon in 1862?', January 19, 2009.

Methods for Studying Video Games and Religion

Game studies has been an understudied area within the emerging field of digital media and religion. Video games can reflect, reject, or reconfigure traditionally held religious ideas and often serve as sources for the production of religious practices and ideas. This collection of essays presents a broad range of influential methodological approaches that illuminate how and why video games shape the construction of religious beliefs and practices, and also situates such research within the wider discourse on how digital media intersect with the religious worlds of the 21st century. Each chapter discusses a particular method and its theoretical background, summarizes existing research, and provides a practical case study that demonstrates how the method specifically contributes to the wider study of video games and religion. Featuring contributions from leading and emerging scholars of religion and digital gaming, this book will be an invaluable resource for scholars in the areas of digital culture, new media, religious studies, and game studies across a wide range of disciplines.

Digital Tools in Urban Schools

TECHNOLOGIES OF THE IMAGINATION NEW MEDIA IN EVERYDAY LIFE Ellen Seiter and Mimi Ito, Series Editors This book ... TITLES IN THE SERIES Skate Life: Re-Imagining White Masculinity by Emily Chivers Yochim My Life as a Night Elf Priest: An ...

Digital Tools in Urban Schools

DIVDigital media in the classroom for both teachers and students/div

Mapping Digital Game Culture in China

Bonnie Nardi's book My Life as a Night Elf Priest offers an excellent ethnographic account of life inside the game World of Warcraft, focusing on the aesthetic experience of playing games in the United States and China.51 However, ...

Mapping Digital Game Culture in China

In this book, Marcella Szablewicz traces what she calls the topography of digital game culture in urban China, drawing our attention to discourse and affect as they shape the popular imaginary surrounding digital games. Szablewicz argues that games are not mere sites of escape from Real Life, but rather locations around which dominant notions about failure, success, and socioeconomic mobility are actively processed and challenged. Covering a range of issues including nostalgia for Internet cafés as sites of youth sociality, the media-driven Internet addiction moral panic, the professionalization of e-sports, and the rise of the self-proclaimed loser (diaosi), Mapping Digital Game Culture in China uses games as a lens onto youth culture and the politics of everyday life in contemporary China. Based on ethnographic fieldwork conducted between 2009 and 2015 and first-hand observations spanning over two decades, the book is also a social history of urban China’s shifting technological landscape.

Digital Humanities and Buddhism

My Life as a Night Elf Priest: An Anthropological Account of the World of Warcraft. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. New York Times. 2009. “Is that an Emoticon in 1862?” January 19, 2009. “Object.

Digital Humanities and Buddhism

IDH Religion provides a series of short introductions to specific areas of study at the intersections of digital humanities and religion, offering an overview of current methodologies, techniques, tools, and projects as well as defining challenges and opportunities for further research. This volume explores DH and Buddhism in four sections: Theory and Method; Digital Conservation, Preservation and Archiving; Digital Analysis; Digital Resources. It covers themes such as language processing, digital libraries, online lexicography, and ethnographic methods.

The Oxford Handbook of American Folklore and Folklife Studies

My Life as a Night Elf Priest: An Anthropological Account of World of Warcraft. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. ... “'Keep Calm and Love Your Dark Skin': Representation of Racial Identity and Embodiment in Black Thinspiration.

The Oxford Handbook of American Folklore and Folklife Studies

"This handbook surveys the materials, approaches, contexts, and applications of American folklore and folklife studies to guide students and scholars of American folklore, culture, history, and society in the future. In addition to longstanding areas in the 350-year legacy of the subject's study and applications such as folktales and speech, the handbook includes exciting fields that have emerged in the twenty-first century such as the Internet, bodylore, folklore of organizations and networks, sexual orientation, neurodiverse identities, and disability groups. These studies encompass cultural traditions in the United States ranging from bits of slang in private conversations to massive public demonstrations, ancient beliefs to contemporary viral memes, and a simple handshake greeting to festivals encompassing multiple genres and groups. Folklore and folklife studies include material traditions such as buildings and crafts as well as oral and social genres of dance, ritual, drama, and play. Whereas the use of lore often emphasizes speech, song, and story that all people express, the rhetoric of life draws attention to tradition-centered communities such as the Amish and Hasidim, occupational groups and their workaday worlds, and children and other age groups. Significant to the American context has been the cultural diversity and changing national boundaries of the United States, relative youth of the nation and its legacy of mass immigration, mobility of residents and their relation to an indigenous and racialized population, and a varied landscape and settlement pattern. The handbook is a reference, therefore, to American studies as well as the global study of tradition, folk arts, and cultural practice"--

The Virtual Future

Beyond them was the Dark Portal itself, a huge stone arch flanked by colossal statues of hooded warriors and ... MIT Press, Cambridge (2008); Nardi, B.A.: My Life as a Night Elf Priest: An Anthropological Account of World of Warcraft.

The Virtual Future

The newest communication technologies are profoundly changing the world's politics, economies, and cultures, but the specific implications of online game worlds remain mysterious. The Virtual Future employs theories and methods from social science to explore nine very different virtual futures: The Matrix Online, Tabula Rasa, Anarchy Online, Entropia Universe, Star Trek Online, EVE Online, Star Wars Galaxies, World of Warcraft: Burning Crusade, and The Chronicles of Riddick. Each presents a different picture of how technology and society could evolve in coming centuries, but one theme runs through all of them, the attempt to escape the Earth and seek new destinies among the stars. Four decades after the last trip to the moon, a new conception of spaceflight is emerging. Rather than rockets shooting humans across vast physical distances to sterile rocks that lack the resources to sustain life, perhaps robot space probes and orbiting telescopes will glean information about the universe, that humans can then experience inside computer-generated environments much closer to home. All nine of these fantastically rich multiplayer masterpieces have shown myriads of people that really radical alternatives to contemporary society could exist, and has served as a laboratory for examining the consequences. Each is a prototype of new social forms, a utopian subculture, and a simulation of technologies that have yet to be invented. They draw upon several different traditions of science fiction and academic philosophy, and they were created in several nations. By comparing these nine role-playing fantasies, we can better consider what kind of world we want to inhabit in the real future.

Virtual Lives A Reference Handbook

One of her recent research interests is the online role-playing game World of Warcraft, which is the focus of her 2010 book My Life as a Night Elf Priest: An Anthropological Account of World of Warcraft. She has authored numerous other ...

Virtual Lives  A Reference Handbook

This book is the THE source for information on virtual worlds, covering every aspect of this intriguing and fast-changing social practice and the technologies upon which it rests. • A detailed chronology detailing inspirations, precursors, developments, and controversies related to virtual worlds • Tables of data about users of virtual worlds • An annotated list of private, nonprofit, and government organizations pertinent to virtual worlds • Biographical sketches of authors, developers, researchers, policymakers, and notable virtual world users • A glossary of scores of relevant terms related to virtual worlds' function and use • A bibliography of additional resources readers can consult to learn even more about virtual worlds

Human Computer Interaction INTERACT 2011

For family members living apart, the game keeps them aware of some of their remote members' activities, but also augments and enriches ... Nardi, B.: My Life as a Night Elf Priest: An Anthropological Account of World of Warcraft.

Human Computer Interaction    INTERACT 2011

The four-volume set LNCS 6946-6949 constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 13th IFIP TC13 International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, INTERACT 2011, held in Lisbon, Portugal, in September 2011. The 46 papers included in the third volume are organized in topical sections on novel user interfaces and interaction techniques, paper 2.0, recommender systems, social media and privacy, social networks, sound and smell, touch interfaces, tabletops, ubiquitous and context-aware computing, UI modeling, and usability.

The Oxford Handbook of Internet Studies

A Casual Revolution: Reinventing Video Games and Their Players, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. ... My Life as a Night Elf Priest: An Anthropological Account of World of Warcraft, Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.

The Oxford Handbook of Internet Studies

The Handbook is a landmark in the dynamic and rapidly expanding field of Internet Studies, bringing together leading international scholars to strengthen research on how the Internet has been studied and the discipline's fundamental questions, and shape research, policy, and practice for the future.

Thanks for Watching

In their book (first published in 2009 and updated in 2018), media scholars Jean Burgess and Joshua Green engaged in ... Another anthropologically motivated digital ethnography is Bonnie Nardi's My Life as a Night Elf Priest (2010), ...

Thanks for Watching

YouTube hosts one billion visitors monthly and sees more than 400 hours of video uploaded every minute. In her award winning book, Thanks for Watching, Patricia G. Lange offers an anthropological perspective on this heavily mediated social environment by analyzing videos and the emotions that motivate sharing them. She demonstrates how core concepts from anthropology—participant-observation, reciprocity, and community—apply to sociality on YouTube. Lange's book reconceptualizes and updates these concepts for video-sharing cultures. Lange draws on 152 interviews with YouTube participants at gatherings throughout the United States, content analyses of more than 300 videos, observations of interactions on and off the site, and participant-observation. She documents how the introduction of monetization options impacted perceived opportunities for open sharing and creative exploration of personal and social messages. Lange’s book provides new insight into patterns of digital migration, YouTube’s influence on off-site interactions, and the emotional impact of losing control over images. The book also debunks traditional myths about online interaction, such as the supposed online/offline binary, the notion that anonymity always degrades public discourse, and the popular characterization of online participants as over-sharing narcissists. YouTubers' experiences illustrate fascinating hybrid forms of contemporary sociality that are neither purely mediated nor sufficient when conducted only in person. Combining intensive ethnography, analysis of video artifacts, and Lange’s personal vlogging experiences, the book explores how YouTubers are creating a posthuman collective characterized by interaction, support, and controversy. In analyzing the tensions between YouTubers' idealistic goals of sociality and the site's need for monetization, Thanks for Watching makes crucial contributions to cultural anthropology, digital ethnography, science and technology studies, new media studies, communication, interaction design, and posthumanism. For its perceptive analysis of video blogging for self-expression and sociality, Thanks for Watching received the Franklyn S. Haiman Award for Distinguished Scholarship in Freedom of Expression (2020), from the National Communication Association.

Narrative in Performance

Nardi, B. A. (2010) My Life as a Night Elf Priest: An Anthropological Account of World of Warcraft (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press). NeynuSaloo (2012) World of Warcraft Dance Origins, https://www.youtube.

Narrative in Performance

A far-reaching and engaging overview of the role of narrative in dance and theatre performance, bringing together chapters written by an international range of scholars and subsequently creating a critical dialogue for approaching this fundamental topic within performance studies. Drawing on historical and contemporary examples of a variety of different performance genres, the book will provide a method for exploring the context of a particular form or artist and enhance students' ability to critically reflect on performance.

Players and Their Pets

Murray, Janet. 1997. Hamlet on the Holodeck. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press. Nardi, Bonnie. 2010. My Life as a Night-Elf Priest: An Anthropological Account of World of Warcraft. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. Newman, James. 2002.

Players and Their Pets

In the world of massively multiplayer online games (MMOGs), Faunasphere was but a blip on the screen in its short public life from 2009 to 2011. Its devoted players, many of them middle-aged women, entered a world that did not build on common fantasy or science-fiction tropes. There was no evil to defeat or realms to conquer, only friendly animals to care for and pollution to fight. In Players and Their Pets, Mia Consalvo and Jason Begy argue that its very difference makes it critically important—even more so than the large, commercially successful games such as World of Warcraft that have all too often shaped game studies discourse. Consalvo and Begy demonstrate how the beta period of an MMOG can establish social norms that guide how the game is played. They also show how a game’s platform creates expectations for how the game will work and who is playing it—and what happens when those expectations clash with the reality. Even while telling the story of this particular game and its predominantly female players, however, Players and Their Pets cautions against oversimplifying players based on their gender. Faunasphere’s playerbase enjoyed diverse aspects of the game, for varied reasons. No other game studies book tracks the entire life cycle of an online game to examine how the game evolved in terms of design as well as how its player community responded to changes and events. The brief life of Faunasphere makes this possible.

EGods

Émile Durkheim, Elementary Forms of the Religious Life: A Study in Religious Sociology , trans. ... MA: MIT Press, 2008) ; Bonnie A. Nardi, My Life as a Night Elf Priest: An Anthropological Account of World of Warcraft (Ann Arbor: ...

EGods

William Bainbridge contends that the worlds of massively multiplayer online roleplaying games provide a new perspective on the human quest, one that combines the arts and simulates most aspects of real life. The quests in gameworlds also provide meaning for human action, in terms of narratives about achieving goals by overcoming obstacles.

Planet in Peril

2; Tegmark, Life 3.0; Chalmers, “The singularity. ... Castronova, Exodus to the Virtual World; Castronova, Synthetic Worlds; Boellstorff, Coming of Age in Second Life; Nardi, My Life as a Night Elf Priest; Taylor, Play Between Worlds.

Planet in Peril

Written by an award-winning historian of science and technology, Planet in Peril describes the top four mega-dangers facing humankind - climate change, nukes, pandemics, and artificial intelligence. It outlines the solutions that have been tried, and analyzes why they have thus far fallen short. These four existential dangers present a special kind of challenge that urgently requires planet-level responses, yet today's international institutions have so far failed to meet this need. The book lays out a realistic pathway for gradually modifying the United Nations over the coming century so that it can become more effective at coordinating global solutions to humanity's problems. Neither optimistic nor pessimistic, but pragmatic and constructive, the book explores how to move past ideological polarization and global political fragmentation. Unafraid to take intellectual risks, Planet in Peril sketches a plausible roadmap toward a safer, more democratic future for us all.

Encyclopedia of Global Studies

My life as a night elf priest: An anthropological account of World of Warcraft. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. Pearce, C. (2009). Communities of play: Emergent cultures in online games and virtual worlds. Cambridge: MIT Press.

Encyclopedia of Global Studies

"With all entries followed by cross-references and further reading lists, this current resource is ideal for high school and college students looking for connecting ideas and additional sources on them. The work brings together the many facets of global studies into a solid reference tool and will help those developing and articulating an ideological perspective." — Library Journal The Encyclopedia of Global Studies is the reference work for the emerging field of global studies. It covers both transnational topics and intellectual approaches to the study of global themes, including the globalization of economies and technologies; the diaspora of cultures and dispersion of peoples; the transnational aspects of social and political change; the global impact of environmental, technological, and health changes; and the organizations and issues related to global civil society. Key Themes: • Global civil society • Global communications, transportation, technology • Global conflict and security • Global culture, media • Global demographic change • Global economic issues • Global environmental and energy issues • Global governance and world order • Global health and nutrition • Global historical antecedents • Global justice and legal issues • Global religions, beliefs, ideologies • Global studies • Identities in global society Readership: Students and academics in the fields of politics and international relations, international business, geography and environmental studies, sociology and cultural studies, and health.