Names and Naming Patterns in England 1538 1700

Summary: Results of the first large-scale quantitative investigation of naming practices in early modern England.

Names and Naming Patterns in England  1538 1700

Summary: Results of the first large-scale quantitative investigation of naming practices in early modern England.

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Der Trend zur Namensgleichheit von Mann und Frau sei nach 1820 / 1825 aber wieder zurückgegangen.13 Im ... Naming Patterns in England , 15381700 , Oxford 1997 , spricht Behörden – insbesondere des Fiskus , der von Anfang an.

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Naming Patterns in the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem

Rüthing , H. , “ Der Wechsel Personennamen in einer spätmittelalterlichen Stadt . Zum Problem der Identifizierung von Personen und zum ... Smith - Bannister , S. , Names and Naming Patterns in England 1538-1700 ( Oxford , 1997 ) .

Naming Patterns in the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem

Anthroponymy, or the study of personal names, is used here to investigate the extent to which Frankish settlers in the Latin kingdom of Jerusalem assimilated the practices and traditions of their hosts. Data from legal and commercial documents has been used to create a database of 6,200 individual names from the years 1099 to 1291 which the author analyses for any trends and patterns that may relate to social change. Comparing evidence with contemporary Catholic Europe, Shagrir finds that the Franks neither adopted local ways nor maintained their own traditions, but changes in naming reflected a unique set of characteristics influenced by eastern contacts, cults and customs and a greater awareness of religious fervour.

The Oxford Handbook of Names and Naming

The Place-Names of the East Riding of Yorkshire and York. English Place-Name Society 14. ... 'The Influence of Name Sounds in the Congressional Elections of 2006', Names 55.4: 465–72. ... Names and Naming Patterns in England, 15381700.

The Oxford Handbook of Names and Naming

In this handbook, scholars from around the world offer an up-to-date account of the state of the art in different areas of onomastics, in a format that is both useful to specialists in related fields and accessible to the general reader. Since Ancient Greece, names have been regarded as central to the study of language, and this has continued to be a major theme of both philosophical and linguistic enquiry throughout the history of Western thought. The investigation of name origins is more recent, as is the study of names in literature. Relatively new is the study of names in society, which draws on techniques from sociolinguistics and has gradually been gathering momentum over the last few decades. The structure of this volume reflects the emergence of the main branches of name studies, in roughly chronological order. The first Part focuses on name theory and outlines key issues about the role of names in language, focusing on grammar, meaning, and discourse. Parts II and III deal with the study of place-names and personal names respectively, while Part IV outlines contrasting approaches to the study of names in literature, with case studies from different languages and time periods. Part V explores the field of socio-onomastics, with chapters relating to the names of people, places, and commercial products. Part VI then examines the interdisciplinary nature of name studies, before the concluding Part presents a selection of animate and inanimate referents ranging from aircraft to animals, and explains the naming strategies adopted for them.

Aspects of English Protestantism C 1530 1700

Confirmation of the comparative rarity of the type of Puritan name with which I was concerned is provided by S. Smith - Bannister , Names and Naming Patterns in England , 15381700 ( Oxford , 1997 ) . 69 Some of this literature is ...

Aspects of English Protestantism C  1530 1700

Aspects of English Protestantism examines the reverberations of the Protestant Reformation, which contented up until the end of the 17th century. In this wide-ranging book Nicholas Tyacke looks at the history of Puritanism, from the Reformation itself, and the new marketplace of ideas that opened up, to the establishment of the freedom of worship for Protestant non-conformists in 1689. Tyacke also looks at the theology of the Restoration Church, and the relationship between religion and science.

Christian Names in Local and Family History

The second was Scott SmithBannister's Names and Naming Patterns in England 1538-1700, which includes nation-wide name counts from the mid-sixteenth century and deals also with the role of the godparents and their influence on ...

Christian Names in Local and Family History

Surnames have always provided key links in historical research. This groundbreaking new work shows that first names can also be highly significant for those tracing genealogies or studying communities. Standard works on first names have always concentrated on etymology. George Redmonds goes much further: he believes that every name has a precise origin and history of expansion, which can be regional or even local; up to c. 1700 it may even have centred on one family. This text fully explores the implications of this belief for local and family history, and challenges many published assumptions on the historical frequency of first names.

Baptism and Spiritual Kinship in Early Modern England

and neighbours in a thirteenth-century Suffolk community«, Journal of Family History, 4 (1981), 219¥56. Smith-Bannister, S., Names and Naming Patterns in England 15381700 (Oxford, 1997). Spufford, M., ...

Baptism and Spiritual Kinship in Early Modern England

Despite the importance of the subject to contemporaries, this is the first monograph to look at the institution of godparenthood in early modern English society. Utilising a wealth of hitherto largely neglected primary source data, this work explores godparenthood, using it as a framework to illuminate wider issues of spiritual kinship and theological change. It has become increasingly common for general studies of family and religious life in pre-industrial England to make reference to the spiritual kinship evident in the institution of godparenthood. However, although there have been a number of important studies of the impact of the institution in other periods, this is the first detailed monograph devoted to the subject in early modern England. This study is possible due to the survival, contrary to many expectations, of relatively large numbers of parish registers that recorded the identities of godparents in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. By utilising this hitherto largely neglected data, in conjunction with evidence gleaned from over 20,000 Wills and numerous other biographical, legal and theological sources, Coster has been able to explore fully the institution of godparenthood and the role it played in society. This book takes the opportunity to study an institution which interacted with a range of social and cultural factors, and to assess the nature of these elements within early modern English society. It also allows the findings of such an investigation to be compared with the assumptions that have been made about the fortunes of the institution in the context of a changing European society. The recent historiography of religion in this period has focused attention on popular elements of religious practice, and stressed the conservatism of a society faced with dramatic theological and ritual change. In this context a study of godparenthood can make a contribution to understanding how religious change occurred and the ways in which popular religious practice was affected.

Naming the People of England c 1100 1350

Smith-Bannister, Scott. Names and Naming Patterns in England 1538-1700. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997. Smith, Dan Scott. “Child-naming practices as cultural and familial indicators.” Local Population Studies 15 (1984): 17-27.

Naming the People of England  c 1100 1350

Medieval historians have for some time recognized the significance of personal naming processes and patterns for the illumination of social relations such as kinship and spiritual kinship or godparenthood. Increasingly, they are employing the investigation of personal naming (anthroponymy) as part of their elucidation of cultural change-attempting, through changes in patterns of personal naming, to discern cultural transitions and transformations. Recent coordinated research on the European continent has produced major collaborative discussion of the cultural implications of naming in France, the Iberian peninsular, and 'Italy'. The fruits of new research into the 'Germanic' lands have also richly enhanced our understanding of cultural change there. So it is predicated that a new trans-European culture arose in the centuries about and after the year 1000. Omitted from this coordinated understanding of the arrival of a new European cultural tradition (as it came to persist) is the British archipelago. We are, however, far from devoid of scholarly examination of the culture of personal naming in the British Isles. An older generation of linguists produced a basic foundation, although it has not remained free of some criticism. Subsequently, several scholars have independently advanced the interpretive analysis (Clark, Fellows Jensen, Insley, and McClure). At one level, then, this book attempts a synthesis of that previous, highly valuable, but diffuse, research, to make it more widely known, understood and accessible. At another level, nonetheless, it engages with what has become a prevailing narrative of cultural change in England after the Norman Conquest: the rapid transformation of English naming (and culture) through the assimilation of a new, dominant, extraneous influence. By reinserting the detail and complexity, it is hoped to demonstrate that far from a single uniform (homologous) culture, there existed residual, even resistant, and 'regional', cultures. The account, it is hoped, presents a cohesive, new narrative of the cultural implications of personal naming in England, whilst also addressing important issues of gender, politics, and social organization.

The Grammar of Names in Anglo Saxon England

'Economic migrants? Continental moneyers' names on the tenthcentury English coinage', Nomina 38: 113–56. Smith-Bannister, S. (1997). Names and Naming Patterns in England 15381700. Oxford: Clarendon Press. Smollett, Tobias [n.d.].

The Grammar of Names in Anglo Saxon England

This book examines personal names, including given and acquired (or nick-) names, and how they were used in Anglo-Saxon England. It discusses their etymologies, semantics, and grammatical behaviour, and considers their evolving place in Anglo-Saxon history and culture. From that culture survive thousands of names on coins, in manuscripts, on stone and other inscriptions. Names are important and their absence a stigma (Grendel's parents have no names); they may have particular functions in ritual and magic; they mark individuals, generally people but also beings with close human contact such as dogs, cats, birds, and horses; and they may provide indications of rank and gender. Dr Colman explores the place of names within the structure of Old English, their derivation, formation, and other linguistic behaviour, and compares them with the products of other Germanic (e.g., Present-day German) and non-Germanic (e.g., Ancient and Present-day Greek) naming systems. Old English personal names typically followed the Germanic system of elements based on common words like leof (adjective 'beloved') and wulf (noun 'wolf'), which give Leofa and Wulf, and often combined as in Wulfraed, (ræd noun, 'advice, counsel') or as in Leofing (with the diminutive suffix -ing). The author looks at the combinatorial and sequencing possibilities of these elements in name formation, and assesses the extent to which, in origin, names may be selected to express qualities manifested by, or expected in, an individual. She examines their different modes of inflection and the variable behaviour of names classified as masculine or feminine. The results of her wide-ranging investigation are provocative and stimulating.

Denizens A Narrative of Captain George Denison and His New England Contemporaries

... The Women Who Came in the Mayflower (Boston: Pilgrim Press, 1920), 74–75. 653 Scott Smith-Bannister, Names and Naming Patterns in England 15381700 (Oxford, d 15381700 d 15381700 England: Clarendon Press, 1997), 135.

Denizens  A Narrative of Captain George Denison and His New England Contemporaries

Be transported back to the 17th Century! Denizens takes its readers to where history happened in England and New England. It recounts true stories about the English Civil War, the Pequot War, and King Philip's War and others about Praying Indian Villages, heirloom apples, and some of New England's oldest working farms. Travel on the high seas with Pilgrims & Puritans coming to New England on the Mayflower & Winthrop Fleet ships. Denizens engages a general audience with its true stories of life in 17th Century New England and the courageous European settlers & Native Americans who called the region home.

Family Names and Family History

... Scott Smith-Bannister, Names and Naming Patterns in England, 15381700 (1997) concludes that there is firm evidence that in the sixteenth century a child's name linked him with his baptismal sponsor but that in practice the role ...

Family Names and Family History

Family names are an essential part of everyone's personal history. The story of their evolution is integral to family history and fascinating in its own right. Formed from first names, place names, nicknames and occupations, names allow us to trace the movements of our ancestors from the middle ages to the present day. David Hey shows how, when and where families first got their names, and proves that most families stayed close to their places of origin. Settlement patterns and family groupings can be traced back towards their origin by using national and local records. Family Names and Family History tells anyone interested in tracing their own name how to set about doing so.

Intimacy and Celebrity in Eighteenth Century Literary Culture

Parents of newborn children throughout England began to christen them with the name “Sacheverell”. ... 37 Scott Smith-Bannister, Names and Naming Patterns in England 15381700 (oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997); Nicholas Tyacke, ...

Intimacy and Celebrity in Eighteenth Century Literary Culture

This book provides an expansive view of celebrity’s intimate dimensions. In the process, it offers a timely reassessment of how notions of private and public were negotiated by writers, readers, actors and audiences in the early to mid-eighteenth century. The essays assembled here explore the lives of a wide range of figures: actors and actresses, but also politicians, churchmen, authors and rogues; some who courted celebrity openly and others who seemed to achieve it almost inadvertently. At a time when the topic of celebrity’s origins is attracting unprecedented scholarly attention, this collection is an important, pioneering resource.

Ralph Tailor s Summer

Slack, P., The Impact of Plague in Tudor and Stuart England (London, 1985). SmithBannister, S., Names and Naming Patterns in England, 15381700 (Oxford, 1997). Spufford, M., “Religious Preambles and the Scribes of Villagers' Wills in ...

Ralph Tailor s Summer

The plague outbreak of 1636 in Newcastle-upon-Tyne was one of the most devastating in English history. This hugely moving study looks in detail at its impact on the city through the eyes of a man who stayed as others fled: the scrivener Ralph Tailor. As a scrivener Tailor was responsible for many of the wills and inventories of his fellow citizens. By listening to and writing down the final wishes of the dying, the young scrivener often became the principal provider of comfort in people’s last hours. Drawing on the rich records left by Tailor during the course of his work along with many other sources, Keith Wrightson vividly reconstructs life in the early modern city during a time of crisis and envisions what such a calamitous decimation of the population must have meant for personal, familial, and social relations.

As you Like it

In England, William was considered so faire (pleasing, attractive) a name that it ranked among the three most common male names in every decade between 1570 and 1700 (Scott Smith-Bannister, Names and Naming Patterns in England 15381700 ...

As you Like it

This annotated version of As you Like it, one of the Bard’s wittiest and bawdiest plays, provides a detailed guide to its Elizabethan language and its references. It restores the drama to the language of the First Folio of 1623, including the original spelling, capitalization and punctuation. Practical annotation provides insights into the puns, allusions and world-play that characterize all of Shakespeare’s dramas. Appendices enumerate the typographical errors that have been corrected in this version, in addition to offering stage directions from the First Folio, lineation amendations and original character tags. This restorative, no-nonsense approach will appeal to both aficionados and newcomers to Shakespeare’s plays.

The Language of Daily Life in England 1400 1800

The English Family 1450–1700. London/New York: Longman. Hughey, Ruth. (Ed.). ... Historical Sociolinguistics: Language Change in Tudor and Stuart England. ... Names and Naming Patterns in England, 15381700. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

The Language of Daily Life in England  1400 1800

The Language of Daily Life in England (1400–1800) is an important state-of-the art account of historical sociolinguistic and socio-pragmatic research. The volume contains nine studies and an introductory essay which discuss linguistic and social variation and change over four centuries. Each study tackles a linguistic or social phenomenon, and approaches it with a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods, always embedded in the socio-historical context. The volume presents new information on linguistic variation and change, while evaluating and developing the relevant theoretical and methodological tools. The writers form one of the leading research teams in the field, and, as compilers of the Corpus of Early English Correspondence, have an informed understanding of the data in all its depth. This volume will be of interest to scholars in historical linguistics, sociolinguistics and socio-pragmatics, but also e.g. social history. The approachable style of writing makes it also inviting for advanced students.

Greek Personal Names

Ενομοy),. and in [-eios] when they derived from s-stem (-γνειοy < *-genes-ios from names ending like Attic ... 11 S. Smith-Bannister, Names and Naming Patterns in England 15381700 (Oxford, 1997), 15. 12 Forms of address need not have ...

Greek Personal Names

Within the great diversity of their world, the assertion of origin was essential to the ancient Greeks in defining their sense of who they were and how they distinguished themselves from neighbours and strangers. Each person's name might carry both identity and origin - 'I am' . . . inseparable from 'I come from' . . . Names have surfaced in many guises and locations - on coins and artefacts, embedded within inscriptions and manuscripts - carrying with them evidence even from prehistoric and preliterate times. The Lexicon of Greek Personal Names has already identified more than 200,000 individuals. The contributors to this volume draw on this resource to demonstrate the breadth of scholarly uses to which name evidence can be put. These essays narrate the stories of political and social change revealed by the incidence of personal names and cast a fascinating light upon both the natural and supernatural phenomena which inspired them. This volume offers dramatic illumination of the ways in which the ancient Greeks both created and interpreted their world through the specific language of personal names.

Names and History

In Everyman's Dictionary of First Names ( 1983 ) , which Dunkling wrote in conjunction with William Gosling ... took the question of first name popularity very seriously and , in Names and Naming Patterns in England , 1538-1700 ( 1997 ) ...

Names and History

Fascinating detective stories into the connections between names and related subjects.

Family and Kinship in England 1450 1800

domestic environment in early modern England and America«, Journal of Social History, 14, 1980. Slater, M., ... Smith-Bannister, S., Names and Naming Patterns in England 15381700, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1997. Tucker, N., ...

Family and Kinship in England  1450 1800

While historians have made the history of family life a key area of scholarly study, the diversity of methods, sources, areas of interest and conclusions this has produced, have made it one of the most difficult for readers to approach.Family & Kinship in England 1450-1800 guides the reader through the changing relationships that made up the nature of family life. It gives a clear introduction to many of the intriguing areas of interest that this field of history has opened up, including childhood, youth, marriage, sexuality and death. The book provides: An understanding of how the family has developed from the late medieval period to the beginnings of industrialisation. A synthesis of the varied work of other historians, which helps to understand the often disjointed or contradictory research into this area. A glossary of technical terms used by historians to describe the family in the past. Contemporary documents and illustrations, allowing readers to familiarise themselves with the business of understanding people in the past. Written in an engaging and accessible manner, Family & Kinship in England 1450-1800 stimulates interest in a fascinating topic and allows readers to pursue their own interests in the history of family life in the past.

Ebb Tide in New England

English naming patterns for girls were remarkably similar . See Scott Smith - Bannister , Names and Naming Patterns in England 15381700 ( New York : Oxford University Press , 1997 ) , chap . 8. See also Eamon Duffy , “ Holy Maydens ...

Ebb Tide in New England

The status of women in four New England seaports during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries is thoroughly documented in this illuminating work.