New Brazilian Gardens

The Legacy of Burle Marx

New Brazilian Gardens

An inspirational and insightful look at contemporary Brazilian garden design and the influence of famed designer Roberto Burle Marx

New Garden Design: Inspiring Private Paradises

New Garden Design: Inspiring Private Paradises

From vegetable and succulent gardens to sculpture and rose gardens to mountain and waterfront gardens, New Garden Design covers a range of interpretations incorporating walls, fountains, pavilions, canals, pools, terraces and groves in unexpected ways. The resulting new garden is a pleasure garden vested with spiritual, symbolic and ecological intent. A modernist interpretation of Roman stone furniture and freestanding walls punctuate the space behind a 1970s ranch house. A home designed by Bernard Maybeck is accented with a freehand composition of urns, cement pipes and rusty objects, as well as over a thousand species of plants. A grove of olive trees underplanted with rosemary and lavender fields gives personality to two acres surrounding a house designed by modernist Mexican architect Ricardo Legorreta.

The Making of Place

Modern and Contemporary Gardens

The Making of Place

Gardening is rich in tradition, and many gardens are explicitly designed to refer to or honor the past. But garden design is also rich in innovation, and in The Making of Place John Dixon Hunt explores the wide varieties of approaches, aesthetics, and achievements in garden design throughout the world today. The gardens Hunt explores offer surprising new ideas about how we can carve out a space for respite in nature. Taking readers to gardens public and private, busy and hidden away, to botanical gardens, small parks, university campuses, and vernacular gardens, Hunt showcases the differences between cultures and countries around the globe, including the United States, United Kingdom, France, Germany, China, and Australia. Richly illustrated, The Making of Place is sure to enchant and inspire even the most modest of home gardeners.

Roberto Burle Marx

Brazilian Modernist

Roberto Burle Marx

An unprecedented look at the wide-ranging artistic work of one of the 20th century s most significant landscape architects "

Hut Pavilion Shrine: Architectural Archetypes in Mid-Century Modernism

Hut Pavilion Shrine: Architectural Archetypes in Mid-Century Modernism

The phase of American architectural history we call 'mid-century modernism,' 1940-1980, saw the spread of Modern Movement tenets of functionalism, social service and anonymity into mainstream practice. It also saw the spread of their seeming opposites. Temples, arcades, domes, and other traditional types occur in both modernist and traditionalist forms from the 1950s to the 1970s. Hut Pavilion Shrine examines this crossroads of modernism and the archetypal, and critiques its buildings and theory. The book centers on one particularly important and omnipresent type, the pavilion - a type which was the basis of major work by Louis I. Kahn, Paul Rudolph, Philip Johnson, Minoru Yamasaki, and other eminent architects. While focusing primarily on the architecture culture of the United States, it also includes the work of British, European Team X, and Scandinavian designers and writers. Making connections between formal analysis, historical context, and theory, the book continues lines of inquiry which have been pursued by Neil Levine and Anthony Vidler on representation, and by Sarah Goldhagen and Alice Friedman on modernism’s 'forbidden' elements of the honorific and the visually pleasurable. It highlights the significance of 'pavilionizing' mid-century designers such as Victor Lundy, John Johansen, Eero Saarinen, and Edward Durell Stone, and shows how frequently essentialist and traditionalist types appeared in the roadside vernacular of drive-in restaurants, gas stations, furniture and car showrooms, branch banks, and motels. The book ties together the threads in mid-century architectural theory that addressed aspects of type, 'essential' structure, and primal 'humanistic' aspects of environment-making and discusses how these concerns outlived the mid-century moment, and in the designs and writings of Aldo Rossi and others they paved the way for Post-Modernism.

Américas

Américas


Roberto Burle Marx

The Modernity of Landscape

Roberto Burle Marx

Roberto Burle Marx (Sao Paulo, 1909-Rio de Janeiro, 1994) is known as a landscape architect, but also as a painter, botanist, gardener, chef and jewellery designer. He considered the garden to be one of the fine arts, as "the adaptation of the biome to civilisation's natural requirements." This book introduces the realm of the full sensory experience. Burle Marx's work with plants becomes highly pictorial--everything is drawn, colored and constructed. In this symbiosis between aesthetics and botany, Burle Marx is the master of both species and spaces. His work is the embodiment of the "nature-city," a concept developed from the garden cities of the late 19th century, which has become compromised in the 21st century due to the compact city model. This new publication focuses on Burle Marx's scientific interest in the landscape and his relationship with the environment. Concepts that continue to be of major significance in contemporary landscape architecture, such as ecology, garden as an art form and landscape design in the urban structure, are some of the subjects the book deals with. The visual information of the book is complemented by the texts by Fares El-Dahdah, Francis Rambert, Jacques Leenhardt, Jose Tabacow, Lelia Coelho Frota, Andre Correa do Lago, Dorothee Imbert, Valerie Fraser and Gilles Clement.