New Dark Ages

The University Press of New England is a consortium of universities in New England dedicated to publishing scholarly ... Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Revell, Donald, 1954– New dark ages / by Donald Revell. p. cm.

New Dark Ages

Winner of the Pen Center USA West Literary Award in Poetry (1990) New Dark Ages is a book of ideas that exhibits a rare quality – adventurousness. The poems are intelligent and deeply felt, complex and crystal clear. Donald Revell writes about things as tender and as complicated as happiness and freedom. His poetry brims with images, wonder, and discovery, as it seeks to answer such questions as :If the original idea of America is defunct, what has taken its place? If privacy is no more, how do we go about the business of loving? If God and history have become one, what is the relationship between morality and expediency?” And, above all, “Why is it that, in spite of all, the twentieth century is so heart-breakingly beautiful – a true vindication of humanism?”

New Dark Ages

It was, he said, “the new dark ages.” At the end, I yelled, I shouted, I pleaded with him. I begged him. I tried to talk him out of it, of course, but it was way too late. So, in the end, I went along with it.

New Dark Ages

The X Gang has lost one of its friends to Earl Turner, a far-right presidential candidate, and the gang is encountering new signs of hate practically everywhere they go.

Against the Night

Argues that the U.S. is on the eve of a new dark age and explains how the Christian community can turn the situation around

Against the Night

Argues that the U.S. is on the eve of a new dark age and explains how the Christian community can turn the situation around

The New Dark Ages Conspiracy

The New Dark Ages Conspiracy


Ethics The Key Thinkers

What matters at this stage is the construction of local forms of community within which civility and the intellectual and moral life can be sustained through the new dark ages which are already upon us. And if the tradition of the ...

Ethics  The Key Thinkers

Introduces and explores the work and ideas of the most important writers in moral philosophy, from Plato to Macintyre.

The Rise of Benedict XVI

What matters at this stage is the construction of local forms of community within which civility and the intellectual and moral life can be sustained through the new dark ages which are already upon us. And if the tradition of the ...

The Rise of Benedict XVI

From the author of Conclave and All the Pope’s Men comes the story of Pope John Paul II’s last days, the behind-the-scenes dynamics within the College of Cardinals that led to the choice of Joseph Ratzinger as Pope Benedict XVI. On April 18, 2005, the College of Cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church gathered to elect a successor to Pope John Paul II. Faced with several potential candidates, the cardinals made a bold choice, entrusting the Keys of the Kingdom to 78-year-old Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger of Germany, a man whose views on the challenges facing the Church and the broader culture could not be more unambiguous, or controversial. Questions arose as the world watched while Ratzinger was installed as Pope Benedict XVI, the 266th pontiff of the Catholic Church. Why Ratzinger? Why someone so clearly identified with the previous pope? Why not a “compromise” choice? Why a Cardinal from Western Europe and not from Africa or Latin America? What would this mean for the future of the Catholic Church? No one can tell the story of exactly what took place during the closed doors meeting, known as the conclave, when Cardinals from around the world cast their votes for the next pope, better than John L. Allen, Jr. As a correspondent for National Catholic Reporter and a Vatican analyst for CNN and National Public Radio, Allen has spent years covering Vatican politics and personalities, and his unique access to Roman halls of power has enabled him to write the ultimate behind-the-scenes account of the election of Pope Benedict XVI. The Rise of Benedict XVI is based on extensive research and exclusive interviews with eight cardinals representing five nationalities, guaranteeing readers an intimate glimpse into this monumental decision. But Allen’s insight also means that he is in a unique position to evaluate the accomplishments and legacy of the man now known as Pope Benedict XVI, and to provide some analysis of the direction he would take the Catholic Church in the coming years. Ratzinger’s long career as a major Vatican insider, force of influence, and occasionally polarizing figure, has ensured that his pontificate will be one of the most fascinating in the history of the Catholic Church. Benedict XVI would certainly have a major impact on the lives of the faithful around the world, and John Allen’s riveting new book is the definitive work on this turning point in history.

The Benedict Proposal

What matters at this stage is the construction of local forms of community within which civility and the intellectual and moral life can be sustained through the new dark ages which are already upon us. . . . This time however the ...

The Benedict Proposal

How ought the church respond to the rise of a post-Christian secular age? Should it retreat? What is the mission of the church in this context? Joseph Ratzinger's eucharistic ecclesiology provides a model for living the relation between communion and mission, a model that provides a sound image for conceiving of and imagining the church's engagement with modernity and the embodiment of missionary communion. Ratzinger's vision, deeply influenced by St. Benedict's and St. Augustine's responses to the problems of their day, offers a theologically and liturgically grounded vision of missionary communion that transcends politics. In light of our creation by, from, and for the triune God, authentic responses to the present dis-integration of reason and community require the witness and invitation of the church as a community for the world. Ratzinger argues that right worship can and does habituate Christians and equip churches to respond to the existential questions confronting modern persons, many of whom seem partially paralyzed by the anxieties of life without truth and communion. Might the witness of communion for mission lived by the new ecclesial movements, especially the Focolare, offer an example of how Ratzinger's creative minorities can successfully evangelize this secular age?

The Maccordion Format

What matters at this stage is the construction of local forms of community within which civility and the intellectual and moral life can be sustained through the new dark ages which are already on us. And if the tradition of the virtues ...

The Maccordion Format


Reference without Referents

new dark ages into a new enlightenment, historians could properly tell the tale as I have told it: Vulcan was originally supposed to be a planet between Mercury and the sun which affected Mercury's orbit in a specific way, ...

Reference without Referents

Reference is a central topic in philosophy of language, and has been the main focus of discussion about how language relates to the world. R. M. Sainsbury sets out a new approach to the concept, which promises to bring to an end some long-standing debates in semantic theory. There is a single category of referring expressions, all of which deserve essentially the same kind of semantic treatment. Included in this category are both singular and plural referring expressions ('Aristotle', 'The Pleiades'), complex and non-complex referring expressions ('The President of the USA in 1970', 'Nixon'), and empty and non-empty referring expressions ('Vulcan', 'Neptune'). Referring expressions are to be described semantically by a reference condition, rather than by being associated with a referent. In arguing for these theses, Sainsbury's book promises to end the fruitless oscillation between Millian and descriptivist views. Millian views insist that every name has a referent, and find it hard to give a good account of names which appear not to have referents, or at least are not known to do so, like ones introduced through error ('Vulcan'), ones where it is disputed whether they have a bearer ('Patanjali') and ones used in fiction. Descriptivist theories require that each name be associated with some body of information. These theories fly in the face of the fact names are useful precisely because there is often no overlap of information among speakers and hearers. The alternative position for which the book argues is firmly non-descriptivist, though it also does not require a referent. A much broader view can be taken of which expressions are referring expressions: not just names and pronouns used demonstratively, but also some complex expressions and some anaphoric uses of pronouns. Sainsbury's approach brings reference into line with truth: no one would think that a semantic theory should associate a sentence with a truth value, but it is commonly held that a semantic theory should associate a sentence with a truth condition, a condition which an arbitrary state of the world would have to satisfy in order to make the sentence true. The right analogy is that a semantic theory should associate a referring expression with a reference condition, a condition which an arbitrary object would have to satisfy in order to be the expression's referent. Lucid and accessible, and written with a minimum of technicality, Sainsbury's book also includes a useful historical survey. It will be of interest to those working in logic, mind, and metaphysics as well as essential reading for philosophers of language.

Rose Belford s Canadian Monthly and National Review

... we shall be in a position to appreciate what Tennyson means by the new dark ages of the popular press , ' as well as to account for the sterility of imaginative and poetical literature at the present day . The Dark Ages of history ...

Rose Belford s Canadian Monthly and National Review


Virtue Ethics and Moral Knowledge

What matters at this stage is the construction of local forms of community within which civility and the intellectual and moral life can be sustained through the new dark ages which are already upon us. And if the tradition of the ...

Virtue Ethics and Moral Knowledge

We live in a time of moral confusion: many believe there are no overarching moral norms, and we have lost an accepted body of moral knowledge. Alasdair MacIntyre addresses this problem in his much-heralded restatement of Aristotelian and Thomistic virtue ethics; Stanley Hauerwas does so through his highly influential work in Christian ethics. Both recast virtue ethics in light of their interpretations of the later Wittgenstein's views of language. This book systematically assesses the underlying presuppositions of MacIntyre and Hauerwas, finding that their attempts to secure moral knowledge and restate virtue ethics, both philosophical and theological, fail. Scott Smith proposes alternative indications as to how we can secure moral knowledge, and how we should proceed in virtue ethics.

The Substance of Gothic

If by the grace of God ( and our own humility ) we are able to lay hold of them , we have won for ourselves a new Middle Ages , a new Renaissance ; and what now seems the peril of a new Dark Ages passes away .

The Substance of Gothic

1917. From the Preface: I have called these lectures, given during the winter of 1916-17 in the Lowell Institute course in Boston, The Substance of Gothic, because in them an effort is made, though briefly and superficially, to deal with the development of Christian architecture from Charlemagne to Henry VIII, rather in relation to its substance than its accidents; to consider it as a definite and growing organism and as the exact and unescapable exponent of a system of life and thought antipodal to that of the modernism that began its final dissolution at the beginning of August A.D. 1914, rather than in the light of its accidents of form and ornament and details of structural design...

Standing Tall

What matters at this stage is the construction of local forms of community with which civility and the intellectual and moral life can be sustained through the new dark ages which are already upon us. And if the tradition of the virtues ...

Standing Tall

A leader must stand tall enough for his followers to find him. "As the God-appointed captain of his family," says Steve Farrar, "a man faces the challenge of spying out the social territory, marking danger zones, and taking stands to protect those in his charge." It's an active leadership role -- and Farrar's been training men to succeed in it for over ten years. In this paperback rerelease of his popular Standing Tall, the men's ministries leader "walks tall" through America -- observing politics, abortion, the gay movement, media trends, and the loss of our "moral boundaries." Farrar offers men sure biblical foundations on which to stand for faith-based living -- closing with "Seven Ways to Help Your Kids Stand Tall." A study guide/appendix makes it great for group use, too!

From Benedict s Peace to Francis s War

That is how the Benedictine monks and nuns kept the light of Faith burning in the Dark Ages and laid the foundations for the glorious era that followed, Christendom at its zenith. We have fallen into a new Dark Ages, but our tools must ...

From Benedict s Peace to Francis s War

An anthology of 70 essays and articles by prelates and pastors, theologians and canonists, philosophers and cultural figures-including: Cardinal Walter Brandmüller • Cardinal Raymond Leo Burke • Cardinal Gerhard Müller • Cardinal Robert Sarah • Cardinal Joseph Zen • Archbishop Thomas Gullickson • Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò • Bishop Rob Mutsaerts • Bishop Athanasius Schneider • Msgr. Charles Pope • Dom Alcuin Reid • Abbé Claude Barthe • Fr. John Hunwicke • Michael Brendan Dougherty • Ross Douthat • Edward Feser • Michael Fiedrowicz • Peter A. Kwasniewski • Phil Lawler • Martin Mosebach • George Neumayr • Joseph Shaw • and many others Already on July 16, 2021, the reactions to Pope Francis's severe restrictions on the traditional Latin Mass in Traditionis Custodes were like a river in full flood: articles, essays, interviews, podcasts-everywhere and from every point of view. An emotional, spiritual, intellectual dam had broken and the waters of discourse poured forth across the world. The sheer volume of writing occasioned by Traditionis Custodes is unlike anything seen in the history of papal documents-testimony to a neuralgic subject on which arguments proliferate and passions run high. The two-month period following the release of the motu proprio gave proof that the traditionalist movement was no fringe phenomenon, but something that had gained significant strength and sympathy during the relatively peaceful years from 2007 to 2021 (the "Pax Benedictina" to which the book's title refers). The purpose of this volume is to gather in one convenient place some of the finest and most appreciated essays and articles published in the period from mid-July through September of this fateful year, 2021-not only from America and England (although these predominate), but also from other nations: France, Germany, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Italy, Spain, Argentina, Poland, Kazakhstan, and China. This book is not, and makes no pretense of being, a presentation of "both sides of the argument." It offers a variety of critiques of this profoundly unwise and unpastoral decree, which suffers from incoherent doctrinal foundations, grave moral and juridical defects, and impossible ecclesiological implications.

Philosophy That Works

The new Dark Ages is just beginning. All philosophy is, or can be, is a reflection of that. It's merely literature doped on its own logic, or poetry without music. Lately there are philosophies for feminists in which patriarchy occurs ...

Philosophy That Works

Are statements of fact true or only more or less useful? This question is of vital importance, because it cuts to the core of the nature of truth; it leads to decisive choices in modern philosophy. Beneath the concept ́truth ́ serious problems defy and resist philosophic analysis; revealing and resolving them is the early focus of PHILOSOPHY THAT WORKS. The way things are, people mix up what they mean by ́truth ́ and get bound up in fallacies that condemn human knowledge to seeminly pointless relativism. But an adequate understanding of ́truth ́ transforms philosophy and individual undertanding, improves thinking itself, and strengthens education, organizations, and society. Showing how so much progress is possible is the business end of this book, the payoff of its thoughtful investigations into truth and knowledge. PHILOSOPHY THAT WORKS is an intellectual adventure, an impassioned story about navigating philosophy from its backwaters down a great river of advancing civilization. The philosopher, disillusioned with academic philosophies, begins an investigation into the many meanings of truth. He makes a lasting discovery that changes what philosophy itself can achieve and what it can mean. He faces daunting tasks but reconfigures philosophy; confusion concerning truth resolves into clear understanding. Who should join the adventure'. Not only philosophers. This is a book for everyone who likes to think. It has power, narrative conviction, and a soulful center that resonates through its pages. (From the Introduction) "...Albert Einstein once mentioned that humanity cannot solve its vexing problems at the same level of thought that produced the crisis. A higher level of thinking will require a philosophic transformation. That ́s what Philosophy That Works is all about. Despite postmodern skepticism, a simplistic true and false outlook on reality remains the commonplace of a civilization; this is the level that has produced the crisis. This book describes a basic change in the dominant paradigm of the age. It shows that a colossal mistake underlies the commonsense outlook, an error that has prevented consensus about what is real and, therefore, what life can mean: it penetrates the problem to its heart..."

Philosophers and Friends

What matters at this stage is the construction of local forms of community within which civility and the intellectual and moral life can be sustained through the new dark ages which are already upon us. And if the tradition of the ...

Philosophers and Friends

With a wealth of anecdote Dorothy Emmet looks back on the philosophers who made a personal impact on her. She brings to life the Oxford of the 1920s, and writes particularly about H.A. Pritchard and R.G. Collingwood. She knew A.N. Whitehead and Samuel Alexander, and remembers philosophers who struggled with political dilemmas when a number of intellectuals were turning to Marxism. Describing the post-war period she recalls R.B. Braithwaite, Michael Polanyi, Alasdair MacIntyre and others. Her personal portraits will interest a wide readership, as well as making essential reading for professional philosophers.

The Evangelical Repository

... had become so saturated with the religion of doubt and unbelief , that it sometimes seemed to us the public mind was , like Tennyson's suicide , " crazed , " and that these are " The new dark ages of the popular press .

The Evangelical Repository


Come Ye Masters of War The Bob Dylan Conspiracy

“Not Dark Yet”—while the rest of us were buoyed by Clinton-era affluence, the robust economy and post-Cold War optimism, Dylan warned of the new Dark Ages and the New American Century, the end of the republic. It's not dark yet, ...

Come Ye Masters of War  The Bob Dylan Conspiracy


Contemporary European Perspectives on the Ethics of End of Life Care

Here is how the book ends: What matters at this stage is the construction of local forms of community within which civility and the moral life can be sustained through the new dark ages which are already upon us.

Contemporary European Perspectives on the Ethics of End of Life Care

This book examines the ethics of end of life care, focusing on the kinds of decisions that are commonly made in clinical practice. Specific attention is paid to the intensification of treatment for terminal symptoms, particularly pain relief, and the withdrawal and withholding of care, particularly life-saving or life-prolonging medical care. The book is structured into three sections. The first section contains essays examining end of life care from the perspective of moral theory and theology. The second sets out various conceptual terms and distinctions relevant to decision-making at the end of life. The third section contains chapters that focus on substantive ethical issues. This format not only provides for a comprehensive analysis of the ethical issues that arise in the context of end of life care but allows readers to effectively trace the philosophical, theological and conceptual underpinnings that inform their specific interests. This work will be of interest to scholars working in the area as well as clinicians, specialists and healthcare professionals who encounter these issues in the course of their practice.

Weldon Kees and the Arts at Midcentury

After one more summer in Provincetown , Kees abandoned New York and headed , as had so many before him , to the seemingly ... in a new Dark Ages , were not literary conventions , but ever present reality , Midcentury Cultural Milieu 27.

Weldon Kees and the Arts at Midcentury

Born in 1914 in Beatrice, Nebraska, and presumed dead in 1955 (when he apparently leapt from the Golden Gate Bridge), Weldon Kees has become one of the better-known ?unknown? American poets of the twentieth century, his fiction and poetry largely kept alive by other poets. But Kees was also that rare artist who excelled in many genres and media: a skillful painter, filmmaker, jazz musician, and composer. He was a gifted critic as well, and his criticism bears the marks of his own deep and broad engagement with the arts.øWeldon Kees and the Arts at Midcentury is the first book to reflect the full range and reach of Kees?s artistic activities. Bringing together writers from various disciplines?art historians, poets, literary critics, curators, and cultural scholars, including Dore Ashton, James Reidel, Dana Gioia, and Stephen C. Foster?this volume offers a wide variety of perspectives through which to evaluate the meaning and significance of Kees?s achievement. Although the essays themselves partake of the diversity of Kees?s impact on the culture, all agree on one fundamental point: any history of postwar American culture that neglects Kees?s multifaceted contribution is ultimately incomplete.