New Statesman

New Statesman


New Statesman

The. New. Statesman. in. Liberal. England. Bernard Shaw never intimidated
Sharp, but then nobody ever did. His attitude towards readers reinforces one's
impression of an Evelyn Waugh of the left, in temperament if not in talent. Letters
to the ...

 New Statesman

This volume reveals how a fledgling Fabian journal came to play a key role in the growth of the modern Labour Party. The author compares its first journalists with later generations of editors and writers and rediscovers the early, and lasting, importance of the British Left's best-known magazine.

Fiction of the New Statesman 1913 1939

This book argues that New Statesman fiction advances a strong realist preoccupation with ordinary, everyday life, and shows how British domestic concerns have a strong hold on the working-class and lower-middle-class imaginative output of ...

Fiction of the New Statesman  1913 1939

Fiction of the New Statesman is the first study of the short stories published in the renowned British journal theNew Statesman. This book argues that New Statesman fiction advances a strong realist preoccupation with ordinary, everyday life, and shows how British domestic concerns have a strong hold on the working-class and lower-middle-class imaginative output of this period.

Acker

Acker


The World Is What It Is

New Statesman, 17 May 1958. 49. New Statesman, 12 July 1958. 50. New
Statesman, 31 May 1958. New Statesman, 4 October 1958. New Statesman, 28
June 1958. 53. New Statesman, 6 December 1958. 54. AI V.S. Naipaul, 20
September ...

The World Is What It Is

This is the first major biography of V.S. Naipaul, Nobel Prize winner and one of the most compelling literary figures of the last fifty years. With great feeling for his formidable body of work, and exclusive access to his private papers and personal recollections, Patrick French has produced a lucid and astonishing account of this enigmatic genius: one which looks sensitively and unflinchingly at his relationships, his development as a writer and as a man, his outspokenness, his peerless creativity, and his extraordinary and enduring position both outside and at the very centre of literary culture. ‘Its clarity, honesty, even-handedness, its panoramic range and close emotional focus, above all its virtually unprecedented access to the dark secret life at its heart, make it one of the most gripping biographies I’ve ever read’ Hilary Spurling, Observer ‘A brilliant biography: exemplary in its thoroughness, sympathetic but tough in tone . . . Reading it I was enthralled – and frequently amused (how incredibly funny Naipaul can be!)’ Spectator ‘A masterly performance . . . If a better biography is published this year, I shall be astonished’ Allan Massie, Literary Review ‘Remarkable. This biography will change the way we read Naipaul’s books’ Craig Brown, Book of the Week, Mail on Sunday

Socialism and the Challenge of War RLE The First World War

(Beatrice) 'Weapons of Socialism', Christian Commonwealth,26 February 1913. (
Beatrice) 'Some impressions ofthe Labour Party Conference', Fabian News, 24, 4
, March 1913. (Beatrice) 'What is socialism?',New Statesman, April–September ...

Socialism and the Challenge of War  RLE The First World War

The First World War marks a crucial period in the history of the socialist wing of the British labour movement. This book is an account of the development of the political ideas and activities of some of the most influential British socialist thinkers of that time: Beatrice and Sidney Webb, R. H. Tawney and G. D. H. Cole. The first part of the book examines the state of the Labour movement and of socialist ideas on the eve of the conflict, then turns to the central question of the impact of the War on the dissemination of British socialist ideas.

This England

This England


The New Statesman Century

The New Statesman Century is an anthology of the finest cultural and political writing, published in the New Statesman over the last hundred years.

The New Statesman Century

The New Statesman Century is an anthology of the finest cultural and political writing, published in the New Statesman over the last hundred years. It contains hundreds of articles not to be found anywhere else, including Christopher Hitchens' final interview, conducted by Richard Dawkins; H G Wells's notorious interview with Joseph Stalin from 1934; Philip Larkin on the "addictive excitement" of a public library; an early excerpt from Christopher Isherwood's diaries as he travelled around China with W H Auden; Christabel Pankhurst on the suffragette movement; George Orwell on London's poor; Bertrand Russell's open letter to General Eisenhower and Nikita Khrushchev at the height of the Cold War (plus their astonishing replies); J B Priestley's "Britain and the Nuclear Bombs", the furious article that launched CND; C P Snow's famous "Two Cultures" essay; as well as contributions by Virginia Woolf, Hugh Grant, Eric Hobsbawm, Julian Barnes, Gore Vidal, Graham Greene, Rebecca West, E M Forster, D H Lawrence, Seamus Heaney, T S Eliot and John Maynard Keynes - plus landmark interviews and profiles of Tony Blair, Harold Wilson, Margaret Thatcher, Mahatma Gandhi, and Winston Churchill.

Statesmanship

Statesmanship

No British periodical or weekly magazine has a richer and more distinguished archive than the New Statesman, which has long been at the centre of British political and cultural life. If not quite at the centre, then at the most energetic, subversive end of the progressive centre-left. Kingsley Martin, editor of the New Statesman from 1930 to 1960, wrote that "life on the NS was always a battle. After all, I had been brought up as a dissenter and I tended to see all problems as moral issues." The magazine has notably recognized and published new writers and critics, as well as encouraged major careers. Many of the most notable political and cultural writers of the recent past have written for the New Statesman. Many have been on its staff or were associates of it: HG Wells, George Bernard Shaw, JM Keynes, VS Pritchett, Paul Johnson, Claire Tomalin, Christopher Hitchens and John Gray. The most significant intellectual and cultural currents of the age ripple through its pages. There is, too, a rich history of poetry and fiction and illustration and cartoons to draw on, from Low's sketches of the great and the good to the gonzo art of Ralph Steadman and the bold cover illustrations and caricatures of André Carrilho. The book is more than an anthology. It tells the story of the New Statesman, from the eve of the First World War to the long aftermath of 9/11 and the populist upheavals of today. It looks forward as well as back, offering a unique and unpredictable perspective on politics, literature and the world.

Statesmanship

The book is more than an anthology. It tells the story of the New Statesman, from the eve of the First World War to the long aftermath of 9/11 and the populist upheavals of today.

Statesmanship

No British periodical or weekly magazine has a richer and more distinguished archive than the New Statesman, which has long been at the centre of British political and cultural life. If not quite at the centre, then at the most energetic, subversive end of the progressive centre-left. Kingsley Martin, editor of the New Statesman from 1930 to 1960, wrote that "life on the NS was always a battle. After all, I had been brought up as a dissenter and I tended to see all problems as moral issues." The magazine has notably recognized and published new writers and critics, as well as encouraged major careers. Many of the most notable political and cultural writers of the recent past have written for the New Statesman. Many have been on its staff or were associates of it: HG Wells, George Bernard Shaw, JM Keynes, VS Pritchett, Paul Johnson, Claire Tomalin, Christopher Hitchens and John Gray. The most significant intellectual and cultural currents of the age ripple through its pages. There is, too, a rich history of poetry and fiction and illustration and cartoons to draw on, from Low's sketches of the great and the good to the gonzo art of Ralph Steadman and the bold cover illustrations and caricatures of André Carrilho. The book is more than an anthology. It tells the story of the New Statesman, from the eve of the First World War to the long aftermath of 9/11 and the populist upheavals of today. It looks forward as well as back, offering a unique and unpredictable perspective on politics, literature and the world.

The B stard File

The B stard File


Critic s London Diary

Critic s London Diary


A Bibliography of Female Economic Thought up to 1940

New Statesman 3(58): 10¥11. ¦¦. 1914. Personal Rights and the Woman«s
Movement: Equal Remuneration for Men and Women. New Statesman 3 (August
): 525¥7. ¦¦, ed. 1914. Personal Rightsandthe Woman«sMovement: The
RightofWomen ...

A Bibliography of Female Economic Thought up to 1940

Contributions to female economic thought have come from prolific scholars, leading social reformers, economic journalists and government officials along with many other women who contributed only one or two works to the field. It is perhaps for this reason that a comprehensive bibliographic collection has failed to appear, until now. This innovative book brings together the most comprehensive collection to date of references to women’s economic writing from the 1770s to 1940. It includes thousands of contributions from more than 1,700 women from the UK, the US and many other countries. This bibliography is an important reference work for systematic inquiry into questions of gender and the history of economic thought. This volume is a valuable resource and will interest researchers on women's contributions to economic thought, the sociology of economics, and the lives of female social scientists and activist-authors. With a comprehensive editorial introduction, it fills a long-standing gap and will be greeted warmly by scholars of the history of economic thought and those involved in feminist economics.