Nicholas Mesarites

The aim of this book is to make accessible to a wider audience the works of Nicholas Mesarites, who deserves to be better known than he is.

Nicholas Mesarites

The aim of this book is to make accessible to a wider audience the works of Nicholas Mesarites, who deserves to be better known than he is. He was an ecclesiastic, who from the turn of the twelfth century provides a vivid record from personal experience of his troubled times, which saw the descent of the Byzantine Empire into factionalism, the loss of its capital Constantinople in 1204 to the armies of the fourth crusade, and its eventual reconstitution in exile as the Empire of Nicaea. Nicholas Mesarites is difficult to place, because the record he left behind was not that of a historian, more that of a social commentator. He preferred to highlight individual incidents and to emphasise personal experience and family relationships. He does not try to make sense of events; only to record their immediate impact. His is a fragmented autobiographical approach, which brings the reader closer to events, but leaves him to construct the bigger picture for himself; whether it is an eyewitness account of a palace coup that failed; a description of the relics of the passion; the memories of a brother, who became a defender of Orthodoxy; the detailed evocation of the Church of the Holy Apostles at Constantinople; the portrayal of his own nervous collapse following the loss of Constantinople; a character study of an ecclesiastical rival; or not least the mishaps -often for comical effect - suffered in the course of his travels. Because he was writing, as he tells us, largely to please himself, Nicholas Mesarites provides an idiosyncratic view of the society in which he moved, and, as he was less bound by literary convention than his contemporaries, he writes with a refreshing directness.

Greek Laughter and Tears

II/I. 59 Nicholas Mesarites 1973: 39.4–12. 60 Browning 1963: 11–12. 61 Nicholas Mesarites 1973: 33.9–12. 62 Nicholas Mesarites 1973: 33–4. 63 Nicholas Mesarites 1973: 41.18–25. 64 Nicholas Mesarites 1973: 41.25–8. 65 Nicholas Mesarites ...

Greek Laughter and Tears

Explores the range and complexity of human emotions and their transmission across cultural traditionsWhat makes us laugh and cry, sometimes at the same time? How do these two primal, seemingly discrete and non-verbal modes of expression intersect in everyday life and ritual, and what range of emotions do they evoke? How may they be voiced, shaped and coloured in literature and liturgy, art and music?Bringing together scholars from diverse periods and disciplines of Hellenic and Byzantine studies, this volume explores the shifting shapes and functions of laughter and tears. With a focus on the tragic, the comic and the tragicomic dimensions of laughter and tears in art, literature and performance, as well as on their emotional, socio-cultural and religious significance, it breaks new ground in the study of ancient and Byzantine affectivity.Key featuresIncludes an international cast of 25 distinguished contributors Prominence is given to performative arts and to interactions with other cultures Transitions from Late Antiquity to Byzantium, and from Byzantium to the Renaissance, form focal points from which contributors look backwards, forwards and sidewaysHighlights the variety, audacity and quality of the finest Byzantine works and the extent to which they anticipated the renaissance

Satire in the Middle Byzantine Period

Both of these literary works, by Efthymios Tornikes and by Nicholas Mesarites, deride John the Fat for his corpulence, his fondness for pleasure, his “Persian” lineage, and his eventual cutting down with the sword.

Satire in the Middle Byzantine Period

This volume explores various forms, functions and meanings of satirical texts written in the Middle Byzantine period.

History of the Byzantine Empire 324 1453

The funeral oration delivered by Nicholas Mesarites on the death of his elder brother shows that Iohn had a careful education, held some office under the last two Comneni, and later, under the Angeli, became a professor of the exegesis ...

History of the Byzantine Empire  324   1453

“This is the revised English translation from the original work in Russian of the history of the Great Byzantine Empire. It is the most complete and thorough work on this subject. From it we get a wonderful panorama of the events and developments of the struggles of early Christianity, both western and eastern, with all of its remains of the wonderful productions of art, architecture, and learning.”—Southwestern Journal of Theology

Zwei Sonnen am Goldenen Horn Teilband 2

PAGONA PAPADOPOULOU — CÉCILE MORRISSON Symbols of Power, Symbols of Piety: Dynastic: and Religious Iconography on Post—iconoclastic Byzantine Coinage At the beginning ofthe 13th century, Nicholas Mesarites, an eyewitness of the events, ...

Zwei Sonnen am Goldenen Horn  Teilband 2


A Companion to the Patriarchate of Constantinople

Menas, patriarch of Constantinople 16 Mesarites, see Nicholas Mesarites Methodios I, patriarch of Constantinople 27, 36 Methodius, apostle of the Slavs 154, 163 Metrophanes I, patriarch of Constantinople 3 Metrophanes II, patriarch of ...

A Companion to the Patriarchate of Constantinople

This volume provides an overview of the development of the Patriarchate of Constantinople as central ecclesiastical institution of the Byzantine Empire from Late Antiquity to the Early Ottoman period (4th to 15th century CE).

Crusading and Trading between West and East

Nicholas Mesarites, one of the leaders of the Orthodox community in Constantinople after 1204, thought he knew the answer. He believed that the Latin patriarch was interested in the icon because of the income he expected it to generate.

Crusading and Trading between West and East

For almost sixty years Professor David Jacoby devoted his research to the economic, social and cultural history of the Eastern Mediterranean and this new collection reflects his impact on the study of the interactions between the Italian city-states, Byzantium, the Latin East and the realm of Islam. Contributors to this volume are prominent scholars from across Medieval Studies and leading historians of the younger generation.

The Hypotyposis of the Monastery of the Theotokos Evergetis Constantinople 11th 12th Centuries

Letter of the deacon most beloved of God and referendarios Nicholas Mesarites sent to the most all-saintly kathegoumenos and most saintly monks of the revered Monastery of the Evergetis, describing all that befell him as he departed for ...

The Hypotyposis of the Monastery of the Theotokos Evergetis  Constantinople  11th   12th Centuries

This book forms part of the Evergetis Project which aims to investigate all surviving texts associated with the Monastery of the Theotokos Evergetis founded in 1049 near Constantinople. A book-length introduction sets out the historical significance of the house for the development of Byzantine monasticism and discusses its administration, liturgy and way of life. An English translation of the Hypotyposis (the monastery's foundation document) is provided, accompanied by detailed notes. Previous scholarship on the authorship of the Hypotyposis and the evolution of the text is discussed and linguistic analysis used to suggest that traces of the original foundation document by Paul Evergetinos can be identified within it. The Hypotyposis was widely used as a model for later Byzantine and Slavonic typika and the precise relationship of these documents one to the other is demonstrated in detail. The volume also includes prosopographical material on the known patrons of the monastery, a discussion of its library, English translations of later Greek and Latin texts referring to the monastery and a suggested reconstruction of Paul Evergetinos' original foundation document.

Sight Touch and Imagination in Byzantium

These matters are stressed in Nicholas Mesarites's ekphrasis of the scene in the Church of Holy Apostles, when Peter attempts to sway Thomas regarding Christ's resurrection, stating that “that which was seen was not an illusion of the ...

Sight  Touch  and Imagination in Byzantium

Considering the interrelations between sight, touch, and imagination, this book surveys classical, late antique, and medieval theories of vision to elaborate on how various spheres of the Byzantine world categorized and comprehended sensation and perception. Revisiting scholarly assumptions about the tactility of sight in the Byzantine world, it demonstrates how the haptic language associated with vision referred to the cognitive actions of the viewer as they grasped sensory data in the mind in order to comprehend and produce working imaginations of objects for thought and memory. At stake is how the affordances and limitations of the senses came to delineate and cultivate the manner in which art and rhetoric was understood as mediating the realities they wished to convey. This would similarly come to contour how Byzantine religious culture could also go about accessing the sacred, the image serving as a site of desire for the mediated representation of the Divine.

Byzantium and the West

Choniates's words were echoed by Nicholas Mesarites, who concluded his account of the sack of Constantinople as follows: 'Such was the reverence displayed towards the things of God by those, who bore the cross of our Lord on their ...

Byzantium and the West

The interaction between Byzantium and the Latin West was intimately connected to practically all the major events and developments which shaped the medieval world in the High and Late Middle Ages – for example, the rise of the ‘papal monarchy’, the launch of the Crusades, the expansion of international and longdistance commerce, or the flowering of the Renaissance. This volume explores not only the actual avenues of interaction between the two sides (trade, political and diplomatic contacts, ecclesiastical dialogue, intellectual exchange, armed conflict), but also the image each side had of the other and the way perceptions evolved over this long period in the context of their manifold contact. Twenty-one stimulating papers offer new insights and original research on numerous aspects of this relationship, pooling the expertise of an international group of scholars working on both sides of the Byzantine-Western ‘divide’, on topics as diverse as identity formation, ideology, court ritual, literary history, military technology and the economy, among others. The particular contribution of the research presented here is the exploration of how cross-cultural relations were shaped by the interplay of the thought-world of the various historical agents and the material circumstances which circumscribed their actions. The volume is primarily aimed at scholars and students interested in the history of Byzantium, the Mediterranean world, and, more widely, intercultural contacts in the Middle Ages.

Greek Monasticism in Southern Italy

We are informed about the actual content of those talks by Nicholas Mesarites's historical account as well, so we can compare the two versions. The main issue of controversy was obviously the pope's primacy: Mesarites's account totally ...

Greek Monasticism in Southern Italy

This volume was conceived with the double aim of providing a background and a further context for the new Dumbarton Oaks English translation of the Life of St Neilos from Rossano, founder of the monastery of Grottaferrata near Rome in 1004. Reflecting this double aim, the volume is divided into two parts. Part I, entitled “Italo-Greek Monasticism,” builds the background to the Life of Neilos by taking several multi-disciplinary approaches to the geographical area, history and literature of the region denoted as Southern Italy. Part II, entitled “The Life of St Neilos,” offers close analyses of the text of Neilos’s hagiography from socio-historical, textual, and contextual perspectives. Together, the two parts provide a solid introduction and offer in-depth studies with original outcomes and wide-ranging bibliographies. Using monasticism as a connecting thread between the various zones and St Neilos as the figure who walked over mountains and across many cultural divides, the essays in this volume span all regions and localities and try to trace thematic arcs between individual testimonies. They highlight the multicultural context in which Southern Italian Christians lived and their way of negotiating differences with Arab and Jewish neighbors through a variety of sources, and especially in saints’ lives.

Proceedings American Philosophical Society vol 100 no 1

The haughty for them , but this is the poorer half of our lives , Pelagius appears to have met his match in Nicholas mortal and frangible ; we wish , however , the better Mesarites , one of the chief Greek protagonists of half to enjoy ...

Proceedings  American Philosophical Society  vol  100  no  1


The Papacy and the Levant 1204 1571 The thirteenth and fourteenth centuries

... by Nicholas Mesarites, metropolitan of Ephesus from about 1213, on his brother John, who died in 1207 (see Aug. ... und der Kirchenunion, I: Der Epitaphios des Nikolaos Mesarites auf seinen Bruder Johannes, Munich, 1923, pp. 41-48.

The Papacy and the Levant  1204 1571  The thirteenth and fourteenth centuries


From the Mandylion of Edessa to the Shroud of Turin

The skeuophylax, that is, the sacristan in charge of the sacred objects, Nicholas Mesarites, with the help of some soldiers, and despite being wounded, managed to repel the rebels. The next day, John Axouch was beheaded by Alexios' ...

From the Mandylion of Edessa to the Shroud of Turin

Andrea Nicolotti reconstructs the history and iconography of an ancient image of Christ, the acheiropoieton ("not made by human hands") Mandylion of Edessa. He refutes the theory that the Mandylion still exists and is known as the Shroud of Turin.

Change in Byzantine Culture in the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries

Nicholas Mesarites was active in the events of his day . During the revolt of John the Fat , Nicholas helped protect the Church of the Virgin of the Pharos , where he served as skeuophylax , from the depredations of the usurper's ...

Change in Byzantine Culture in the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries

Byzantium, that dark sphere on the periphery of medieval Europe, is commonly regarded as the immutable residue of Rome's decline. In this highly original and provocative work, Alexander Kazhdan and Ann Wharton Epstein revise this traditional image by documenting the dynamic social changes that occurred during the eleventh and twelfth centuries.

Byzantine Intersectionality

Nicholas Mesarites, Description of the Church of Holy Apostles 33.3, ed. and trans. Glanville Downey, “Nikolaos Mesarites: Description of the Church of Holy Apostles,” Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, n.s., ...

Byzantine Intersectionality

A fascinating history of marginalized identities in the medieval world While the term “intersectionality” was coined in 1989, the existence of marginalized identities extends back over millennia. Byzantine Intersectionality reveals the fascinating, little-examined conversations in medieval thought and visual culture around matters of sexual and reproductive consent, bullying and slut-shaming, homosocial and homoerotic relationships, trans and nonbinary gender identities, and the depiction of racialized minorities. Roland Betancourt explores these issues in the context of the Byzantine Empire, using sources from late antiquity and early Christianity up to the early modern period. Highlighting nuanced and strikingly modern approaches by medieval writers, philosophers, theologians, and doctors, Betancourt offers a new history of gender, sexuality, and race. Betancourt weaves together art, literature, and an impressive array of texts to investigate depictions of sexual consent in images of the Virgin Mary, tactics of sexual shaming in the story of Empress Theodora, narratives of transgender monks, portrayals of same-gender desire in images of the Doubting Thomas, and stereotypes of gender and ethnicity in representations of the Ethiopian Eunuch. He also gathers evidence from medical manuals detailing everything from surgical practices for late terminations of pregnancy to save a mother’s life to a host of procedures used to affirm a person’s gender. Showing how understandings of gender, sexuality, and race have long been enmeshed, Byzantine Intersectionality offers a groundbreaking look at the culture of the medieval world.

Relations Between East and West in the Middle Ages

I 3 Nicephorus Blemmydes, Io; Nicephorus Gregoras, 8 Nicetas Choniates, 81, 85, 87, 88 Nicholas Mesarites, 99 Nicholas of Otranto, abbot, IOI Nicosia, cathedral, 86 Nika revolt, 22 Nikephoros, see Nicephorus Nilus of Rossano, St, ...

Relations Between East and West in the Middle Ages

In the Roman Empire, relations between East and West meant connections between the eastern and western parts of a unified structure of empire. Romans sometimes complained about the corrupting influence on their city of Greeks and Orientals, but they employed Greek tutors to educate their sons. People did not think of the eastern and western parts of the empire as being separate entities whose relations with each other must be the object of careful study. Even at the moment of the empire's birth, there was a clear idea of where the Latin West ended and the Greek East began. This began to change with Constantine, when the Roman Empire was split in two, with Rome itself in decay.This volume, first published in 1973, derives from a colloquium on medieval history held at Edinburgh University. Its theme was the fl uctuating balance-of-power of Latin West and Greek East, Rome and Constantinople. The book starts with Justinian's attempt to reunite the two halves of the old Roman Empire and then goes on to consider the polarization of Christianity into its Catholic and Orthodox sectors, and the misunderstandings fostered by the Crusades; and ends with the growing power and conquests of Islam in the fourteenth century.The contributions included in Relations between East and West in the Middle Ages are: Old and New Rome in the Age of Justinian, by W. H. C. Frend; The Tenth Century in Byzantine-Western Relationships, by Karl Leyser; William of Tyre, by R. H. C. Davis; Cultural Relations between East and West in the Twelfth Century, by Anthony Bryer; Innocent III and the Greeks, Aggressor or Apostle? by Joseph Gill; Government in Latin Syria and the Commercial Privileges of Foreign Merchants, by Jonathan Riley-Smith; and Dante and Islam, by R. W. Southern.

Relations between East and West in the Middle ages

13 Nicephorus Blemmydes, 105 Nicephorus Gregoras, 8 Nicetas Choniates, 81, 85, 87, 88 Nicholas Mesarites, 99 Nicholas of Otranto, abbot, 101 Nicosia, cathedral, 86 Nika revolt, 22 Nikephoros, see Nicephorus ree Megale Jjyntaxir ...

Relations between East and West in the Middle ages

In the Roman Empire, relations between East and West meant connections between the eastern and western parts of a unified structure of empire. Romans sometimes complained about the corrupting influence on their city of Greeks and Orientals, but they employed Greek tutors to educate their sons. People did not think of the eastern and western parts of the empire as being separate entities whose relations with each other must be the object of careful study. Even at the moment of the empire's birth, there was a clear idea of where the Latin West ended and the Greek East began. This began to change with Constantine, when the Roman Empire was split in two, with Rome itself in decay. This volume, first published in 1973, derives from a colloquium on medieval history held at Edinburgh University. Its theme was the fl uctuating balance-of-power of Latin West and Greek East, Rome and Constantinople. The book starts with Justinian's attempt to reunite the two halves of the old Roman Empire and then goes on to consider the polarization of Christianity into its Catholic and Orthodox sectors, and the misunderstandings fostered by the Crusades; and ends with the growing power and conquests of Islam in the fourteenth century. The contributions included in Relations between East and West in the Middle Ages are: Old and New Rome in the Age of Justinian, by W. H. C. Frend; The Tenth Century in Byzantine-Western Relationships, by Karl Leyser; William of Tyre, by R. H. C. Davis; Cultural Relations between East and West in the Twelfth Century, by Anthony Bryer; Innocent III and the Greeks, Aggressor or Apostle? by Joseph Gill; Government in Latin Syria and the Commercial Privileges of Foreign Merchants, by Jonathan Riley-Smith; and Dante and Islam, by R. W. Southern.

History of the Church From the High Middle Ages to the eve of the Reformation

At first he organized gatherings of the Byzantine clergy , in which it seems that John's brother , the deacon Nicholas Mesarites , was the Greeks ' spokesman . But then , apparently in the understanding that the monks counted for more ...

History of the Church  From the High Middle Ages to the eve of the Reformation


The Symbol at Your Door

70 Nicholas Mesarites, tr. Mango (1972), 232. 71 John of Damascus, De fide, tr. Chase (1958), 352–3. 72 Nicholas Mesarites, tr. Downey (1957), 870. 73 Mathews (1988/95), XII. 18; idem (1990/95), XIII. 210. See also Gage (1995), 45.

The Symbol at Your Door

Is the display of number and geometry in medieval religious architecture evidence of intended symbolism? This book offers a new perspective in the retrieval of meaning from architecture in the Greek East and the Latin West, and challenges the view that geometry was merely an outcome of practical procedures by masons. Instead, it attributes intellectual meaning to it as understood by Christian Platonist thought and provides compelling evidence that the symbolism was often intended. In so doing, the book serves as a companion volume to The Wise Master Builder by the same author, which found the same system implicit in plans of cathedrals and abbeys. The present book explains how the architectural symbolism proposed could have been understood at the time, as supported by medieval texts and its context, since it is context that can confer specific meaning. The introduction locates the study in its critical context and summarizes Christian Platonism as it determined the meaning of number and geometry. The investigation opens with the recurrent symbolism of the dome and the cube as heaven and earth in the Byzantine world and moves to the duality of the temple and the body in the East and West as reflections of Plato's universal macrocosm and human microcosm. The study then examines each of the figures of Platonic geometry in the architecture of the West against the background of their mathematics and metaphysics, before proceeding to their synthesis with the circle, as seen in circular and polygonal structures, the divisions of circles in Christian art, and their display in window tracery, culminating in the rose window. In view of the multivalency of the symbolism, the investigation establishes systematic occurrences of it, which strongly suggest patterns of thought underlying systems of design. The book concludes with a series of test cases, which show the after-life of the same symbolism as it overlapped with the Renaissance.