Nietzsche as a Scholar of Antiquity

Interdisciplinary in scope and international in perspective, this volume investigates Nietzsche as a scholar of antiquity, offering the first thorough examination of his articles, lectures, notebooks on Ancient Greek culture and thought in ...

Nietzsche as a Scholar of Antiquity

Typically, the first decade of Friedrich Nietzsche's career is considered a sort of précis to his mature thinking. Yet his philological articles, lectures, and notebooks on Ancient Greek culture and thought - much of which has received insufficient scholarly attention - were never intended to serve as a preparatory ground to future thought. Nietzsche's early scholarship was intended to express his insights into the character of antiquity. Many of those insights are not only important for better understanding Nietzsche; they remain vital for understanding antiquity today. Interdisciplinary in scope and international in perspective, this volume investigates Nietzsche as a scholar of antiquity, offering the first thorough examination of his articles, lectures, notebooks on Ancient Greek culture and thought in English. With eleven original chapters by some of the leading Nietzsche scholars and classicists from around the world and with reproductions of two definitive essays, this book analyzes Nietzsche's scholarly methods and aims, his understanding of antiquity, and his influence on the history of classical studies.

An Interpretation of Nietzsche s On the Uses and Disadvantage of History for Life

Rather than dismiss it as a mere ‘early’ work, Jensen shows how the text resonates in Nietzsche’s later perspectivism, his theory of subjectivity, and Eternal Recurrence.

An Interpretation of Nietzsche s On the Uses and Disadvantage of History for Life

With his An Interpretation of Nietzsche’s "On the Uses and Disadvantage of History for Life", Anthony K. Jensen shows how 'timely' Nietzsche’s second "Untimely Meditation" really is. This comprehensive and insightful study contextualizes and analyzes a wide range of Nietzsche’s earlier thoughts about history: teleology, typology, psychology, memory, classical philology, Hegelianism, and the role historiography plays in modern culture. On the Uses and Disadvantage of History for Life is shown to be a ‘timely’ work, too, insofar as it weaves together a number of Nietzsche's most important influences and thematic directions at that time: ancient culture, science, epistemology, and the thought of Schopenhauer and Burckhardt. Rather than dismiss it as a mere ‘early’ work, Jensen shows how the text resonates in Nietzsche’s later perspectivism, his theory of subjectivity, and Eternal Recurrence. And by using careful philological analysis of the text’s composition history, Jensen is in position to fully elucidate and evaluate Nietzsche’s arguments in their proper contexts. As such Jensen’s Interpretation should restore Nietzsche’s second "Untimely Meditation" to a prominent place among 19th Century philosophies of history.

Focus On 100 Most Popular Deaths from Pneumonia

Brobjer, Thomas H. "Why Did Nietzsche Receive a Scholarship to Study at Schulpforta?". Nietzsche-Studien. ... The Good European: Nietzsche's work sites in word and image. ... Nietzsche as a Scholar of Antiquity, A&C Black, 2014, p. 4.

Focus On  100 Most Popular Deaths from Pneumonia


Nietzsche on Memory and History

Latacz, Joachim (2014): „On Nietzsche's Philological Beginnings“. In: Anthony K. Jensen und Helmut Heit (Hrsg.): Nietzsche as a Scholar of Antiquity. London: Bloomsbury Academic, S. 3–26. Salaquarda, Jörg (1978): „Nietzsche und Lange“.

Nietzsche on Memory and History

History and memory rank as central themes in the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche. As one of the last philosophers of the 19th century, Nietzsche naturally belongs to the so-called ‘historical century’. The contentious exchange with the past and with antiquity – as much as the mechanisms, the dangers, and the lessons of memory and tradition – are continually examined and stand in close relationship with Nietzsche’s vision of life and his project of human development. As Jacob Burckhardt once wrote of the cultural critique to his Basel colleague: "Fundamentally, you are always teaching history" (9/13/1882). Following Burckhardt’s judgment, the contributors focus on the analysis of core questions in the philosophies of history and memory, and their respective convergence in the thought of Nietzsche. The epistemological relevance of these central concepts will be thematized alongside those concerning tradition, and education. The discussion of these rich themes unifies a broad spectrum of questions, ranging from cultural memory to contemporary philosophy of mind. The contributions are revised versions of selected papers presented at the 2018 conference of the annual meeting of the Nietzsche Society in Naumburg.

Nietzsche

'The History of Literature as an Issue: Nietzsche's Attempt to Represent Antiquity', in Anthony K. Jensen and Helmut Heit (eds), Nietzsche as a Scholar of Antiquity, London and New York: Bloomsbury, 159–79. Schmitt, Carl (2008).

Nietzsche

The topic chosen by Nietzsche for his Pforta dissertation was Theognis, his life in Megara, his lyrical production, and his views on the gods, morality and politics. Nietzsche saw Theognis as the intellectual champion of the defeated Megarian aristocracy, who sought to preserve the Dorian spirit and its noble virtues. The interests that guided Nietzsche transcended scientific philology and embraced a concern for the social and political context he adumbrated in the Theognidea. The editors of this volume refer to this novel standpoint as constituting a rudimentary political philology, showing that Theognis’ aristocratism determined and guided Nietzsche’s critique of the moral point of view and his conception of an aristocratic state. Contents Introduction: Nietzsche’s Aristocratism by Renato Cristi Part I: Theognis and Nietzsche’s Aristocratism Part II. Nietzsche’s Aristocratic Ethics: Command and Obedience Part III. Nietzsche’s Aristocratic Radicalism: Charismatic Authority Nietzsche, On Theognis of Megara (De Theognide Megarensi), translated by Oscar Velásquez Nietzsche, Studies on Theognis (Studien zu Theognis), translated by Manuel Knoll & Renato Cristi

Nietzsche on Consciousness and the Embodied Mind

... Nietzsche's “On the Uses and Disadvantages of History for Life” (Routledge, 2016), Nietzsche's Philosophy of History (Cambridge University Press, 2013), and with Helmut Heit, Nietzsche as a Scholar of Antiquity (Bloomsbury, 2014).

Nietzsche on Consciousness and the Embodied Mind

Nietzsche’s thought has been of renewed interest to philosophers in both the Anglo- American and the phenomenological and hermeneutic traditions. Nietzsche on Consciousness and the Embodied Mind presents 16 essays from analytic and continental perspectives. Appealing to both international communities of scholars, the volume seeks to deepen the appreciation of Nietzsche’s contribution to our understanding of consciousness and the mind. Over the past decades, a variety of disciplines have engaged with Nietzsche’s thought, including anthropology, biology, history, linguistics, neuroscience, and psychology, to name just a few. His rich and perspicacious treatment of consciousness, mind, and body cannot be reduced to any single discipline, and has the potential to speak to many. And, as several contributors make clear, Nietzsche’s investigations into consciousness and the embodied mind are integral to his wider ethical concerns. This volume contains contributions by international experts such as Christa Davis Acampora (Emory University), Keith Ansell-Pearson (Warwick University), João Constâncio (Universidade Nova de Lisboa), Frank Chouraqui (Leiden University), Manuel Dries (The Open University; Oxford University), Christian J. Emden (Rice University), Maria Cristina Fornari (University of Salento), Anthony K. Jensen (Providence College), Helmut Heit (Tongji University), Charlie Huenemann (Utah State University), Vanessa Lemm (Flinders University), Lawrence J. Hatab (Old Dominion University), Mattia Riccardi (University of Porto), Friedrich Ulfers and Mark Daniel Cohen (New York University and EGS), and Benedetta Zavatta (CNRS).

Nietzsche and the Dionysian

Nietzsche as a Scholar of Antiquity (London: Bloomsbury, 2014). Jensen, Anthony K., 'Helmholtz, Lange, and Unconscious Symbols of the Self', in João Constâncio, Maria João Mayer Branco and Bartholomew Ryan (eds.) ...

Nietzsche and the Dionysian

Nietzsche and the Dionysian argues that the Dionysian affect in Nietzsche’s early work can be linked to an originary interruption of self-consciousness articulated by the philosophical companion, who compels us to respond to the plurality of life they express by being ‘true to the earth’ and ‘becoming who we are’. Such an ethics, compelled by the Dionysian affect, grounds any future for humanity in the affirmation of the earth and life.

Nietzsche and the Philosophers

He has published three books: Nietzsche's Philosophy of History (Cambridge University Press, 2013); with Helmut Heit, Nietzsche as a Scholar of Antiquity (Bloomsbury, 2014); and An Interpretation of Nietzsche's ...

Nietzsche and the Philosophers

Nietzsche is undoubtedly one of the most original and influential thinkers in the history of philosophy. With ideas such as the overman, will to power, the eternal recurrence, and perspectivism, Nietzsche challenges us to reconceive how it is that we know and understand the world, and what it means to be a human being. Further, in his works, he not only grapples with previous great philosophers and their ideas, but he also calls into question and redefines what it means to do philosophy. Nietzsche and the Philosophers for the first time sets out to examine explicitly Nietzsche’s relationship to his most important predecessors. This anthology includes essays by many of the leading Nietzsche scholars, including Keith Ansell-Pearson, Daniel Conway, Tracy B. Strong, Gary Shapiro, Babette Babich, Mark Anderson, and Paul S. Loeb. These excellent writers discuss Nietzsche’s engagement with such figures as Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Socrates, Hume, Schopenhauer, Emerson, Rousseau, and the Buddha. Anyone interested in Nietzsche or the history of philosophy generally will find much of great interest in this volume.

The Oxford Handbook of Hesiod

Nietzsche as a Scholar of Antiquity. London. Kerenyi, C. 1997. Prometheus: Archetypal Image of Human Existence. Translated by R. Manheim. Princeton, NJ. Lamberton, R. 1988. Hesiod. New Haven, CT, and London. Latacz, J. 2014.

The Oxford Handbook of Hesiod

This volume brings together 29 junior and senior scholars to discuss aspects of Hesiod's poetry and its milieu and to explore questions of reception over two and half millennia from shortly after the poems' conception to Twitter hashtags. Rather than an exhaustive study of Hesiodic themes, the Handbook is conceived as a guide through terrain, some familiar, other less charted, examining both Hesiodic craft and later engagements with Hesiod's stories of the gods and moralizing proscriptions of just human behavior. The volume opens with the "Hesiodic Question," to address questions of authorship, historicity, and the nature of composition of Hesiod's two major poems, the Theogony and Works and Days. Subsequent chapters on the archaeology and economic history of archaic Boiotia, Indo-European poetics, and Hesiodic style offer a critical picture of the sorts of questions that have been asked rather than an attempt to resolve debate. Other chapters discuss Hesiod's particular rendering of the supernatural and the performative nature of the Works and Days, as well as competing diachronic and synchronic temporalities and varying portrayals of female in the two poems. The rich story of reception ranges from Solon to comic books. These chapters continue to explore the nature of Hesiod's poetics, as different writers through time single out new aspects of his art less evident to earlier readers. Long before the advent of Christianity, classical writers leveled their criticism at Hesiod's version of polytheism. The relative importance of Hesiod's two major poems across time also tells us a tale of the age receiving the poems. In the past two centuries, artists and writers have come to embrace the Hesiodic stories for themselves for the insight they offer of the human condition but even as old allegory looks quaint to modern eyes new forms of allegory take form.

Nietzsche and The Antichrist

He is the author of Nietzsche and the Political (Routledge, 1997), Nietzsche's Dangerous Game (Cambridge University ... (Cambridge University Press, 2013) and, with Helmut Heit, Nietzsche as a Scholar of Antiquity (Bloomsbury, 2014).

Nietzsche and The Antichrist

This collection both reflects and contributes to the recent surge of philosophical interest in The Antichrist and represents a major contribution to Nietzsche studies. Nietzsche regarded The Antichrist, along with Zarathustra, as his most important work. In it he outlined many epoch-defining ideas, including his dawning realisation of the 'death of God' and the inception of a new, post-moral epoch in Western history. He called the work 'a crisis without equal on earth, the most profound collision of conscience, a decision that was conjured up against everything that had been believed, demanded, hallowed'. One certainly need not share Nietzsche's estimation of his achievement in The Antichrist to conclude that there is something significant going on in this work. Indeed, even if Nietzsche overestimated its transformative power, it would be valuable nonetheless to have a clearer sense of why he thought so highly of this particular book, which is something of an outlier in his oeuvre. Until now, there has been no book that attempts to account with philosophical precision for the multiple themes addressed in this difficult and complex work.

Brill s Companion to the Reception of Socrates

Anderson, M. 'Nietzsche's subversive rewritings of Phaedo-Platonism', in: M.T. Conrad (ed.) ... Barnes, J. 'Nietzsche and Diogenes Laertius', Nietzsche-Studien 15 (1986) 16–40. ... Nietzsche as a scholar of antiquity. London 2014, 75–98.

Brill s Companion to the Reception of Socrates

Brill’s Companion to the Reception of Socrates, edited by Christopher Moore, provides three-dozen studies of nearly 2500 continuous years of philosophical and literary engagement with Socrates as innovative intellectual, moral exemplar, and singular Athenian.

Nietzsche s Ecce Homo

Most, Glenn W./Fries, Thomas (2014): “The Sources of Nietzsche's Lectures on Rhetoric”. (Trans.) Ian Thomas Fleishman. In: Anthony K. Jensen/Helmut Heit (Eds): Nietzsche as a Scholar of Antiquity. London/New York, pp. 53–74.

Nietzsche   s    Ecce Homo

Friedrich Nietzsche’s intellectual autobiography Ecce Homo has always been a controversial book. Nietzsche prepared it for publication just before he became incurably insane in early 1889, but it was held back until after his death, and finally appeared only in 1908. For much of the first century of its reception, Ecce Homo met with a sceptical response and was viewed as merely a testament to its author’s incipient madness. This was hardly surprising, since he is deliberately outrageous with the ‘megalomaniacal’ self-advertisement of his chapter titles, and brazenly claims ‘I am not a man, I am dynamite’ as he attempts to explode one preconception after another in the Western philosophical tradition. In recent decades there has been increased interest in the work, especially in the English-speaking world, but the present volume is the first collection of essays in any language devoted to the work. Most of the essays are selected from the proceedings of an international conference held in London to mark the centenary of the first publication of Ecce Homo in 2008. They are supplemented by a number of specially commissioned essays. Contributors include established and emerging Nietzsche scholars from the UK and USA, Germany and France, Portugal, Sweden and the Netherlands.

Nietzsche and Friendship

Also available from Bloomsbury Foucault and Nietzsche, Alan Rosenberg and Joseph Westfall Heidegger and Nietzsche, Louis P. Blond Interpreting Nietzsche, Ashley Woodward Nietzsche as a Scholar of Antiquity, Anthony K. Jensen and Helmut ...

Nietzsche and Friendship

In Nietzsche and Friendship, Willow Verkerk provides a new and provocative account of Nietzsche's philosophy which identifies him as an agonistic thinker concerned with the topics of love and friendship. She argues that Nietzsche's challenges to the received principles of friendship from Aristotle to Kant offer resources for reinvigorating our thinking about friendship today. Through an examination of his free spirit texts, Human, All Too Human, Daybreak and The Gay Science together with Thus Spoke Zarathustra and Beyond Good and Evil, Verkerk unlocks key aspects of Nietzsche's thinking on friendship, love, 'woman', the self, self-overcoming, virtue, and character. She questions Nietzsche's misogyny, but also considers the emancipatory potential of his writing by brining him into dialogue with postmodern, feminist, and transgender thinkers. This book revives interest in the ethical, therapeutic, and political dimensions of Nietzsche's philosophy.

The Making of Friedrich Nietzsche

Nietzsche. London/Boston, MA: Routledge & Kegan Paul 1999. Nietzsche: the man and his philosophy. ... Willing and nothingness: Schopenhauer as Nietzsche's educator. Oxford: Clarendon Press Janz, ... Nietzsche as a scholar of antiquity.

The Making of Friedrich Nietzsche

How did Nietzsche the philosopher come into being? The Nietzsche known today did not develop 'naturally', through the gradual maturation of some inborn character. Instead, from an early age he engaged in a self-conscious campaign to follow his own guidance, thereby cultivating the critical capacities and personal vision which figure in his books. As a result, his published works are steeped in values that he discovered long before he mobilized their results. Indeed, one could argue that the first work which he authored was not a book at all, but his own persona. Based on scholarship previously available only in German, this book examines Nietzsche's unstable childhood, his determination to advance through self-formation, and the ways in which his environment, notably the Prussian education system, alternately influenced and impeded his efforts to find his own way. It will be essential reading for all who are interested in Nietzsche.

A Theory of the Aphorism

My modest contribution to this vast field is to insist that Nietzsche's thoughts on the nature of the unfinished, the becoming, and the contradictions of ... Anthony K. Jensen and Helmut Heit, Nietzsche as a Scholar of Antiquity, esp.

A Theory of the Aphorism

An engaging look at the aphorism, the shortest literary form, across time, languages, and cultures Aphorisms—or short philosophical sayings—appear everywhere, from Confucius to Twitter, the Buddha to the Bible, Heraclitus to Nietzsche. Yet despite this ubiquity, the aphorism is the least studied literary form. What are its origins? How did it develop? Were the enigmatic sayings of charismatic sages the original “social media”? And why do some of our most celebrated modern philosophers use aphoristic fragments to convey their deepest ideas? In A Theory of the Aphorism, Andrew Hui crisscrosses histories and cultures to answer these questions and more. Encompassing literature, philology, and philosophy, A Theory of the Aphorism invites us to reflect anew on the meaning of this pithiest of literary forms.

The Incorporeal

As is common in Nietzsche scholarship, I will refer to numbered paragraphs or sections in Nietzsche's texts rather than page numbers, as this enables any ... Nietzsche as a Scholar of Antiquity (London: Bloomsbury, 2014), 115–38.

The Incorporeal

Philosophy has inherited a powerful impulse to embrace either dualism or a reductive monism—either a radical separation of mind and body or the reduction of mind to body. But from its origins in the writings of the Stoics, the first thoroughgoing materialists, another view has acknowledged that no forms of materialism can be completely self-inclusive—space, time, the void, and sense are the incorporeal conditions of all that is corporeal or material. In The Incorporeal Elizabeth Grosz argues that the ideal is inherent in the material and the material in the ideal, and, by tracing its development over time, she makes the case that this same idea reasserts itself in different intellectual contexts. Grosz shows that not only are idealism and materialism inextricably linked but that this "belonging together" of the entirety of ideality and the entirety of materiality is not mediated or created by human consciousness. Instead, it is an ontological condition for the development of human consciousness. Grosz draws from Spinoza's material and ideal concept of substance, Nietzsche's amor fati, Deleuze and Guattari's plane of immanence, Simondon's preindividual, and Raymond Ruyer's self-survey or autoaffection to show that the world preexists the evolution of the human and that its material and incorporeal forces are the conditions for all forms of life, human and nonhuman alike. A masterwork by an eminent theoretician, The Incorporeal offers profound new insight into the mind-body problem

Lovers of Philosophy

Diethe, Carol, Nietzsche's Women: Beyond the Whip (2013), De Gruyter Douglas, Burnham & Jesinghausen, Martin, ... A.K. & Heit, H., Nietzsche as a Scholar of Antiquity (2014), Bloomsbury Joachim Köhler, Zarathustra's Secret: The Interior ...

Lovers of Philosophy

They were Europe's greatest thinkers, but what were they like at love? Lovers of Philosophy explores the love lives of seven philosophers, and how their most intimate experiences came to shape their ideas. In these pages, the reader learns about the significance of Kant's infatuation, Hegel's premarital liaisons, Nietzsche's heartbreak, Heidegger's hypocrisy, Sartre's promiscuous polyamory, Foucault's sexual liberation, and Derrida's dalliances in extramarital desire. The stories of these philosophers' love lives are told against a backdrop of Europe undergoing tumultuous change. Beginning in the eighteenth-century Prussian Enlightenment, the book traverses the French Revolution, Napoleonic wars, Industrial Revolution, two World Wars, and events of May 1968 before arriving at the culture wars of the late twentieth century. For anyone who has struggled to understand continental philosophy's vast array of movements, from German idealism through to phenomenology, existentialism, post-structuralism, and deconstructionism, Lovers of Philosophy also provides the reader with an easy-to-follow overview of the progression of ideas from Kant to Derrida.

Reading Nietzsche through the Ancients

In Nietzsche-Lexikon, ed. C. Niemeyer. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, pp. 164–165. Heit, Helmut and Anthony K. Jensen (2014): Nietzsche's Value as a Scholar of Antiquity. London: Bloomsbury Academic.

Reading Nietzsche through the Ancients

Nietzsche’s work was shaped by his engagement with ancient Greek philosophy. Matthew Meyer analyzes Nietzsche’s concepts of becoming and perspectivism and his alleged rejection of the principle of non-contradiction, and he traces these views back to the Heraclitean-Protagorean position that Plato and Aristotle critically analyze in the Theaetetus and Metaphysica IV, respectively. At the center of this Heraclitean-Protagorean position is a relational ontology in which everything exists and is what it is only in relation to something else. Meyer argues that this relational ontology is not only theoretically foundational for Nietzsche’s philosophical project, in that it is the common element in Nietzsche’s views on becoming, perspectivism, and the principle of non-contradiction, but also textually foundational, in that Nietzsche implicitly commits himself to such an ontology in raising the question of opposites at the beginning of both Human, All Too Human and Beyond Good and Evil.

Postclassicisms

Value Works mentioned: Nietzsche quotes from Anselm Feuerbach's “brilliant” work in “The Greek Music-Drama” from 1870 ... On Nietzsche's uses of classical antiquity, see A. K. Jensen, ed., Nietzsche as a Scholar of Antiquity (London: ...

Postclassicisms

Made up of nine prominent scholars, The Postclassicisms Collective aims to map a space for theorizing and reflecting on the values attributed to antiquity. The product of these reflections, Postclassicisms takes up a set of questions about what it means to know and care about Greco-Roman antiquity in our turbulent world and offers suggestions for a discipline in transformation, as new communities are being built around the study of the ancient Greco-Roman world. Structured around three primary concepts—value, time, and responsibility—and nine additional concepts, Postclassicisms asks scholars to reflect upon why they choose to work in classics, to examine how proximity to and distance from antiquity has been—and continues to be—figured, and to consider what they seek to accomplish within their own scholarly practices. Together, the authors argue that a stronger critical self-awareness, an enhanced sense of the intellectual history of the methods of classics, and a greater understanding of the ethical and political implications of the decisions that the discipline makes will lead to a more engaged intellectual life, both for classicists and, ultimately, for society. A timely intervention into the present and future of the discipline, Postclassicisms will be required reading for professional classicists and students alike and a model for collaborative disciplinary intervention by scholars in other fields.

From Hegel to Windelband

It seems fair to speak of Hegel's antiquity, or Zeller's, or, for that matter, Aristotle's or Diogenes Laërtius'. ... in: Anthony K. Jensen and Helmut Heit (Eds.), Nietzsche as a Scholar of Antiquity, London: Bloomsbury, 115–137.

From Hegel to Windelband

In the 19th century, the history of philosophy becomes the history of a particular science. Modern philosophical historiography is an ambivalent project. On the one hand, we find an affirmative concept of Bildung through tradition and historical insight; on the other, there arises a critical reflection on historical education in the light of an emerging critique of modern culture. The book offers a comprehensive overview of the debate.