Nobel Prize Women in Science

The book reveals the relentless discrimination these women faced both as students and as researchers. Their success was due to the fact that they were passionately in love with science.

Nobel Prize Women in Science

Since 1901 there have been over three hundred recipients of the Nobel Prize in the sciences. Only ten of them -- about 3 percent -- have been women. Why? In this updated version of Nobel Prize Women in Science, Sharon Bertsch McGrayne explores the reasons for this astonishing disparity by examining the lives and achievements of fifteen women scientists who either won a Nobel Prize or played a crucial role in a Nobel Prize - winning project. The book reveals the relentless discrimination these women faced both as students and as researchers. Their success was due to the fact that they were passionately in love with science. The book begins with Marie Curie, the first woman to win the Nobel Prize in physics. Readers are then introduced to Christiane Nusslein-Volhard, Emmy Noether, Lise Meitner, Barbara McClintock, Chien-Shiung Wu, and Rosalind Franklin. These and other remarkable women portrayed here struggled against gender discrimination, raised families, and became political and religious leaders. They were mountain climbers, musicians, seamstresses, and gourmet cooks. Above all, they were strong, joyful women in love with discovery. Nobel Prize Women in Science is a startling and revealing look into the history of science and the critical and inspiring role that women have played in the drama of scientific progress.

Women and Science

97–107; and Sharon Bertsch McGrayne, Nobel Prize Women in Science: Their Lives, Struggles, and Momentous Discoveries (1993), pp. 11–36. Curie's life has, of course, been the subject of many full-length biographies.

Women and Science

From Maria Winkelman's discovery of the comet of 1702 to the Nobel Prize-winning work of twentieth-century scientist Barbara McClintock, women have played a central role in modern science. Their successes have not come easily, nor have they been consistently recognized. This book examines the challenges and barriers women scientists have faced and chronicles their achievements as they struggled to attain recognition for their work in the male-dominated world of modern science.

Blue Genes and Polyester Plants

Covers such areas as zoology, chemistry, computers, physics, earth sciences, and medicine

Blue Genes and Polyester Plants

Covers such areas as zoology, chemistry, computers, physics, earth sciences, and medicine

Trailblazers 33 Women in Science Who Changed the World

Nobel Prize Women in Science: Their Lives, Struggles, and Momentous Discoveries. 2nd ed. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 2001. Smeltzer, Ronald K., Robert J. Ruben, and Paulette Rose. Extraordinary Women in Science & Medicine: ...

Trailblazers  33 Women in Science Who Changed the World

Florence Nightingale. Sally Ride. Ada Lovelace. These names and others are etched in history and included here as part of an awe-inspiring collection of profiles of thirty-three of the most influential women in science—women whose vision, creativity, passion, and dedication have changed the world. Aspiring scientists, young history enthusiasts, and children who enjoy learning about the world will be fascinated by these riveting snapshots—and parents who enjoyed the film Hidden Figures will find this to be the perfect extension. Covering important advancements made by women in fields such as biology, medicine, astronomy, and technology, author Rachel Swaby explains that people aren’t born brilliant scientists. They observe and experiment as kids and as adults, testing ideas again and again, each time learning something new. Kids are sure to come away with a renewed curiosity about the world and the realization that the road to discovery can be positively thrilling. “This collective biography is most timely. An interesting, engaging collection . . . that will encourage readers to explore further and perhaps pursue their own scientific curiosities.” —Kirkus Reviews “The descriptions of the women’s lives often have a quiet poetry. Readers . . . will find much to admire in these accomplished and unconventional women.” —Publishers Weekly “Swaby’s powerful book serves as an indispensable reminder that women have always been essential to science and innovation. Certain to inspire the next generation of scientists.” —Nathalia Holt, New York Times bestselling author of Rise of the Rocket Girls: The Women Who Propelled Us, From Missiles to the Moon to Mars

Headstrong

BARBARA MCCLINTOCK 96 “I didn't belong to that family” As quoted in Sharon Bertsch Mc96 97 97 97 98 98 99 99 99 Grayne, Nobel Prize Women in Science: Their Lives, Struggles, and Momentous Discoveries. 2nd ed.

Headstrong

Fifty-two inspiring and insightful profiles of history’s brightest female scientists. “Rachel Swaby’s no-nonsense and needed Headstrong dynamically profiles historically overlooked female visionaries in science, technology, engineering, and math.”—Elle In 2013, the New York Times published an obituary for Yvonne Brill. It began: “She made a mean beef stroganoff, followed her husband from job to job, and took eight years off from work to raise three children.” It wasn’t until the second paragraph that readers discovered why the Times had devoted several hundred words to her life: Brill was a brilliant rocket scientist who invented a propulsion system to keep communications satellites in orbit, and had recently been awarded the National Medal of Technology and Innovation. Among the questions the obituary—and consequent outcry—prompted were, Who are the role models for today’s female scientists, and where can we find the stories that cast them in their true light? Headstrong delivers a powerful, global, and engaging response. Covering Nobel Prize winners and major innovators, as well as lesser-known but hugely significant scientists who influence our every day, Rachel Swaby’s vibrant profiles span centuries of courageous thinkers and illustrate how each one’s ideas developed, from their first moment of scientific engagement through the research and discovery for which they’re best known. This fascinating tour reveals 52 women at their best—while encouraging and inspiring a new generation of girls to put on their lab coats.

The Theory That Would Not Die

Drawing on primary source material and interviews with statisticians and other scientists, The Theory That Would Not Die is the riveting account of how a seemingly simple theorem ignited one of the greatest controversies of all time.

The Theory That Would Not Die

"This account of how a once reviled theory, Baye’s rule, came to underpin modern life is both approachable and engrossing" (Sunday Times). A New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice Bayes' rule appears to be a straightforward, one-line theorem: by updating our initial beliefs with objective new information, we get a new and improved belief. To its adherents, it is an elegant statement about learning from experience. To its opponents, it is subjectivity run amok. In the first-ever account of Bayes' rule for general readers, Sharon Bertsch McGrayne explores this controversial theorem and the generations-long human drama surrounding it. McGrayne traces the rule’s discovery by an 18th century amateur mathematician through its development by French scientist Pierre Simon Laplace. She reveals why respected statisticians rendered it professionally taboo for 150 years—while practitioners relied on it to solve crises involving great uncertainty and scanty information, such as Alan Turing's work breaking Germany's Enigma code during World War II. McGrayne also explains how the advent of computer technology in the 1980s proved to be a game-changer. Today, Bayes' rule is used everywhere from DNA de-coding to Homeland Security. Drawing on primary source material and interviews with statisticians and other scientists, The Theory That Would Not Die is the riveting account of how a seemingly simple theorem ignited one of the greatest controversies of all time.

Reader s Guide to the History of Science

... 1991 Kass-Simon, G. and Patricia Fames, Women of Science: Righting the Record, Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1990 McGrayne, Sharon Bertsch, Nobel Prize Women in Science: Their Lives, Struggles, and Momentous Discoveries, ...

Reader s Guide to the History of Science

The Reader's Guide to the History of Science looks at the literature of science in some 550 entries on individuals (Einstein), institutions and disciplines (Mathematics), general themes (Romantic Science) and central concepts (Paradigm and Fact). The history of science is construed widely to include the history of medicine and technology as is reflected in the range of disciplines from which the international team of 200 contributors are drawn.

Writing about Lives in Science

The excitement generated by the 2009 Nobel Prizes, as the first ever occasion when gender parity was achieved in the history ... 36 Sharon B. McGrayne, Nobel Prize Women in Science: Their Lives, Struggles, and Momentous Discoveries (New ...

Writing about Lives in Science

Following discussions on scientific biography carried out over the past few decades, this book proposes a kaleidoscopic survey of the uses of biography as a tool to understand science and its context. It offers food for thought on the role played by the gender of the biographer and the biographee in the process of writing. To provide orientation in such a challenging field, some of the authors have accepted to write about their own professional experience while reflecting on the case studies they have been working on. Focusing on (auto)biography may help us to build bridges between different approaches to men and women’s lives in science. The authors belong to a variety of academic and professional fields, including the history of science, anthropology, literary studies, and science journalism. The period covered spans from 1732, when Laura Bassi was the first woman to get a tenured professorship of physics, to 2009, when Elizabeth H. Blackburn and Carol W. Greider were the first women’s team to have won a Nobel Prize in science.

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Women in World History

A look at Nobel laureates makes it clear that although formal barriers have tumbled, less obvious ones remain. In the three scientific ... Nobel Prize Women in Science: Their Lives, Struggles, and Momentous Discoveries. 2nd ed.

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Women in World History

This encyclopedia captures the experiences of women throughout world history and illuminates how they have influenced and been influenced by these historical, social, and demographic changes. It contains over 1,300 signed articles covering six main areas: biographies; geography and history; comparative culture and society; organizations and movements; womens and gender studies; and topics in world history.

Women and Science

References. Fields: Psychiatry or Psychoanalysis. Nationality: USA. Themes: Nature of Women. Science in Women's Lives. 1582. McGrayne, Sharon Bertsch. Nobel Prize Women in Science: Their Lives, Struggles, and Momentous Discoveries.

Women and Science

First Published in 1996. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Women Scientists

Sharon Bertsch McGrayne, Nobel Prize Women in Science: Their Lives, Struggles and Momentous Discoveries, 2nd ed., Secaucus, NJ: Carol Publishing Group, 1998, 93. 5. H. Theorell, Presentation Speech, Nobel Lectures, Physiology or ...

Women Scientists

Magdolna Hargittai uses over fifteen years of in-depth conversation with female physicists, chemists, biomedical researchers, and other scientists to form cohesive ideas on the state of the modern female scientist. The compilation, based on sixty conversations, examines unique challenges that women with serious scientific aspirations face. In addition to addressing challenges and the unjustifiable underrepresentation of women at the higher levels of academia, Hargittai takes a balanced approach by discussing how some of the most successful of these women have managed to obtain professional success and personal happiness. Women Scientists portrays scientists from different backgrounds, different geographical regions-eighteen countries from four continents-and leaders from a variety of professional backgrounds, including eight Nobel laureate women. The book is divided into three sections: "Husband and Wife Teams," "Women at the Top," and "In High Positions." Hargittai uses her own experience to introduce her first section on the lives of prominent scientific couples and addresses the joys and disadvantages of husband and wife teams. The second section is a comprehensive exploration of the struggles and triumphs of "women at the top." Hargittai introduces women from countries where relatively little has been written about female scientists. The final section focuses on women scientists involved with science administration and leadership. Hargittai's biographical sketches role models for budding scientists. The book is a much needed account of female presence and influence in the sciences.

A to Z of Women in Science and Math

Nobel Prize Women in Science: Their Lives, Struggles, and Momentous Discoveries. New York: Birch Lane Press, 1993, 280–303. F Evans, Alice Catherine (1881–1975) American microbiologist Alice Evans showed that a dangerous disease was ...

A to Z of Women in Science and Math

From ancient times to the present day, scientifically inclined women in many cultures have had to battle against the traditional belief that men are more cognitively adept than women. At times throughout history, women were persecuted for their attempts to break down traditional gender barriers. Today, women scientists and mathematicians must continue to defend the quality of their work and demand the respect they deserve in the mathematical and scientific communities.A to Z of Women in Science and Math, Revised Edition profiles 195 women who fought against these stereotypes throughout history and all over the world to forge new discoveries and theories that would eventually change the way we view science. This thoroughly revised book updates the story of each individual to the present day and features 38 new profiles. Among the profiles included are those of chemists, astronomers, geologists, environmental scientists, and a range of other professions and careers. In addition, new photographs have been added, and the bibliography has been updated. Subject indexes allow the reader to search by such professions as microbiology and paleontology.Additional subject indexes organize individuals by country of birth, country of major scientific activity, and year of birth.

Reader s Guide to Women s Studies

... 1983 McGrayne, Sharon Bertsch, Nobel Prize Women in Science: Their Lives, Struggles, and Momentous Discoveries, New York: Carol, 1993 Sime, Ruth Lewin, Lise Meitner: A Life in Physics, Berkeley: University of California Press, ...

Reader s Guide to Women s Studies

The Reader's Guide to Women's Studies is a searching and analytical description of the most prominent and influential works written in the now universal field of women's studies. Some 200 scholars have contributed to the project which adopts a multi-layered approach allowing for comprehensive treatment of its subject matter. Entries range from very broad themes such as "Health: General Works" to entries on specific individuals or more focused topics such as "Doctors."

The Palgrave Handbook of Women and Science since 1660

2003. Rosalind Franklin: Dark Lady of DNA. London and New York: Harper Perennial. McGrayne, Sharon Bertsch. 2001. Nobel Prize Women in Science: Their Lives, Struggles, and Momentous Discoveries. Washington, DC: Henry Joseph Press.

The Palgrave Handbook of Women and Science since 1660


Women who Changed the World

Nobel Prize Women in Science: Their Lives, Struggles and Momentous Discoveries. 2nd ed. A Birch Lane Press Book. Brief biographies and discussion of the work of 15 women who either won a Nobel Prize (by 1995) or did work that ...

Women who Changed the World

"Women Who Changed the World presents a selection of biographical essays on women from all continents and periods of world history written by a team of more than 100 scholars. Entries have been selected to provide truly global coverage. Along with some of the world's most influential women, entries include little known women as well, providing breadth of coverage and the historical depth of an ever-evolving human story that is inclusive of women's experiences and their own voices. It offers middle school, high school, and university students of world history, as well as non-specialist general readers, an opportunity to explore the global past from a gendered perspective"--

Encyclopedia of World Scientists

Lindop, Laurie. Dynamic Modern Women: Scientists and Doctors. New York: Holt, 1997. McGrayne, Sharon Bertsch. Nobel Prize Women in Science: Their Lives, Struggles, and Momentous Discoveries. Secaucus, N.J.: Carol Publishing Group, ...

Encyclopedia of World Scientists

Contains short biographies of almost 1,000 scientists from around the world who made great contributions to science throughout history.

Women Science and Myth

New York: Basic Books, 1988. Liversidge, Anthony. “Interview: Rita Levi-Montalcini.” Omni 10(6) (1988): 70–74, 102–105. McGrayne, Sharon Bertsch. Nobel Prize Women in Science: Their Lives, Struggles, and Momentous Discoveries. 2nd ed.

Women  Science  and Myth

Examines scientific and mythic beliefs about gender and the role of women in the sciences from earliest times up to the present, discussing such topics as hormones, race, feminism, and changing attitudes toward women scientists.

Women in Science

The Nobel Prize Winners : Chemistry , Vol . 2 , 1938–1968 , Pasadena , California , CA , Salem Press , 1990 . Sharon Bertsch McGrayne , Nobel Prize Women in Science : Their Lives , Struggles and Momentous Discoveries , New York , Birch ...

Women in Science

The first book of its kind to provide a full and comprehensive historical grounding of the contemporary issues of gender and women in science. Women in Science includes a detailed survey of the history behind the popular subject and engages the reader with a theoretical and informed understanding with significant issues like science and race, gender and technology and masculinity. It moves beyond the historical work on women and science by avoiding focusing on individual women scientists.