Not Enough Room to Swing a Cat

As the crow flies'', ''chunder'', ''cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey'', ''three sheets to the wind'' - many terms like these are used in everyday English language conversation and writing.

Not Enough Room to Swing a Cat

As the crow flies'', ''chunder'', ''cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey'', ''three sheets to the wind'' - many terms like these are used in everyday English language conversation and writing. But how many landlubbers know that they derive from naval slang or know what the phrase originally referred to? The navy has helped to shape modern society. The navy is famous for its traditions, quirks and nuances. It is disinctly different to wider society and nowhere is this more evident than in language. The naval community once had its own language, incomprehensible to anyone who was not a sailor, which described and explained his unique world. But on shore leave these men introduced their language to the populations of bustling ports and harbours and the usage slowly spread inland. Today through the mediums of film, television and music, naval slang has been brought to the wider public and has become fully integrated into the English language to point where many phrases are used by people who have no concept of their meaning. Presenting terminology thematically, this book provides a compilation of naval slang throughout the world, from terms relating to ship-handling and seamanship through to food and drink, discipline and insults. The text is further enhanced with original black line drawings that illustrate certain technical terms, such as ''splice the mainbrace''.

Jim Jarmusch

In the next shot, he is still trying to break the ice: “Not enough room to swing a cat,” he points out as he swings his hand in a circle, trying to elicit some response. The comedy here is as much in his language as in his upbeat ...

Jim Jarmusch

Publisher description

Origins of the Specious

"no room to swing a cat." So if you're squeamish, feel free to skip this section. The usual explanation is that the “cat" in the saying refers to the infamous cat-o'-nine-tails once used to keep wayward sailors in line on British ...

Origins of the Specious

Do you cringe when a talking head pronounces “niche” as NITCH? Do you get bent out of shape when your teenager begins a sentence with “and”? Do you think British spellings are more “civilised” than the American versions? If you answered yes to any of those questions, you’re myth-informed. In Origins of the Specious, word mavens Patricia T. O’Conner and Stewart Kellerman reveal why some of grammar’s best-known “rules” aren’t—and never were—rules at all. This playfully witty, rigorously researched book sets the record straight about bogus word origins, politically correct fictions, phony français, fake acronyms, and more. Here are some shockers: “They” was once commonly used for both singular and plural, much the way “you” is today. And an eighteenth-century female grammarian, of all people, is largely responsible for the all-purpose “he.” From the Queen’s English to street slang, this eye-opening romp will be the toast of grammarphiles and the salvation of grammarphobes. Take our word for it.

350 Idioms with Their Origin or The Idiomatic Cake You Can Eat and Have It Too 350

Its appeal comes from the simple rhyme. no rest for the wicked «ни сна, ни отдыха измученной душе» MEANING: ORIGIN: you cannot relax I can't talk – I've got to finish this essay. ... no room/not enough room to swing a cat ...

350 Idioms with Their Origin  or The Idiomatic Cake You Can Eat and Have It Too  350

Книга цикла авторских фразеологических словарей содержит новый подход к изучению идиоматики. Структура книги поможет глубже понять значение идиомы, а история её происхождения останется в памяти, что позволит адекватно употребить это выражение в речи, делая её более богатой и красочной.

CONCISE DICTIONARY OF ENGLISH COMBINED IDIOMS PHRASES PROBERBS SIMILIES

No strings attached If something has no strings attached, there are no obligations or requirements involved. ... Not enough room to swing a cat If a room is very small, you can say that there isn't enough room to swing a cat in it.

CONCISE DICTIONARY OF ENGLISH COMBINED  IDIOMS  PHRASES  PROBERBS  SIMILIES

This authoritative dictionary is designed to help readers expand vocabulary and language skills to reach appreciative levels and then exceed that! Hence, pick up the various ways to explain the meaning of idioms, phrases and proverbs, besides interpreting figurative language, such as metaphors and similes.The volume is composed of four separate sections:1. Idioms, 2.Phrases, 3.Proverbs and 4.Metaphors and Similes Key Featureso Sentences focussed on figurative language and sayingso Includes common idioms, popular phrases, witty proverbs, metaphors and similes.o Contains hyperbole and adages at appropriate placeso Organized into A-Z format with sentences at easy and moderate levelso Allows readers to develop and then apply new skills of expressiono Aligns to the English and Foreign words currently in popular useBenefitso Produces a complete understanding of common idiomso Provides recognizing the meaning of popular phraseso Encourages readers to understand and relate to witty proverbso Develops the ability to use metaphors and simileso Introduces adage and hyperboleo Improves vocabulary and enhances knowledge of word meaningso Polishes persuasive, descriptive and narrative writing skills

The Cat s Out of the Bag

Explanation. 4. Explanation number 4 remains with the sea, where the term cat can describe a compact merchant vessel. If a mooring did not have enough space for such a vessel to manoeuvre, then there was not enough room to swing a cat.

The Cat s Out of the Bag

From ancient times cats have occupied a special place in many cultures around the world. They have generated a fascinating array of words and expressions, as well as poems, books, movies, cartoons and artworks. Max Cryer celebrates cats and all they have given to us. Explores their attributes, night vision, sense of smell, sleep requirements, life expectancy and more. Everything you ever wanted to know about cats can be enjoyed in this magnificent miscellany. To be read with one on your lap.

The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms

[First half of 1900s] note ➧ See compare notes; make a note of; of note; strike the right note; take note; take notes. no telling ➧ See there's no telling. not enough room to swing a cat Very little space, cramped quarters, ...

The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms

From “all systems go” to “senior moment”—a comprehensive reference to idiomatic English. The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms explores the meanings and origins of idioms that may not make literal sense but play an important role in the language—including phrasal verbs such as kick back, proverbs such as too many cooks spoil the broth, interjections such as tough beans, and figures of speech such as elephant in the room. With extensive revisions that reflect new historical scholarship and changes in the English language, this second edition defines over 10,000 idiomatic expressions in greater detail than any other dictionary available today—a remarkable reference for those studying the English language, or anyone who enjoys learning its many wonderful quirks and expressions. “Invaluable as a teaching tool.” —School Library Journal

The Long and Wine Ing Road

"Richard, look love, they're so darling and inexpensive" my soulmate exclaimed "It's a tent on wheels" "We could live in this" "You're not serious?" "It's not that small" "Not enough room to swing a cat!" I mumbled under my breath "Oh ...

The Long and Wine Ing Road

Exploring the intersection of art, science and religion, "Seeking Truth: Living with Doubt" considers that all three are paths to the same end. Attacking not only the unyielding smugness of evolutionary biologists but also the uncompromising surety of Fundamentalist figureheads (in both the Christian and Islamic faiths), author Steven Fortney and Marshall Onellion take the reader on a path that disavows all such certainties and considers the thought-provoking question; What does it mean to live with doubt? Far from leaving questions unanswered, instead they tackle such questions as proof versus faith, the impossibility of absolute understanding, and how a combination of art, science and religion can lead to a transcendence of that which we cannot know. In so doing, they expose the dangers of "certainty," be it in religion, science or any other ideology that claims to offer absolute truth. "Seeking Truth: Living with Doubt" has been endorsed by theologians (Arthur Dewey, Professor of Theology, Xavier University [a Jesuit University], Ohio, USA), biologists (Clark Lindgren, Grinnell College, Iowa, USA), and physicists (Narendra Kumar, Director of the Raman Research Institute, Bangalore, India), by Christians, Jews, Hindus and Buddhists. It will appeal to those interested in the two channels of truth seeking: transcencence (also called religion) and the physical world (also called science). The book interconnects many science topics, including cosmology, neurobiology and evolution, to religion and the arts. It also proposes some unorthodox ideas, including the equivalence of the Christian concept of Grace and the Buddhist concept of Emptiness, and that what a religious devout person does in prayer is identical to what a writer does during the creative process.

My Mama Always Said

For a room which she considered too small or too crowded, Mama had this comment: There's not enough room in here to swing a cat without getting fur all in your mouth. To describe fidgeting, such as that of a young child squirming in ...

My Mama Always Said


A Method for Linguistic Metaphor Identification

Stuart: 〈unclear〉 Unknown: No shower curtain mind you. Jill: Even so no room to swing a cat Unknown: Terrible The Macmillan dictionary defines not enough room to swing a cat as 'used for saying that a room is very small and there is ...

A Method for Linguistic Metaphor Identification

This book presents a complete method for the identification of metaphor in language at the level of word use. It is based on extensive methodological and empirical corpus-linguistic research in two languages, English and Dutch. The method is formulated as an explicit manual of instructions covering one chapter, the method being a development and refinement of the popular MIP procedure presented by the Pragglejaz Group in 2007. The extended version is called MIPVU, as it was developed at VU University Amsterdam. Its application is demonstrated in five case studies addressing metaphor in English news texts, conversations, fiction, and academic texts, and Dutch news texts and conversations. Two methodological chapters follow reporting a series of successful reliability tests and a series of post hoc troubleshooting exercises. The final chapter presents a first empirical analysis of the findings, and shows what this type of methodological attention can mean for research and theory.

English Idioms in Use Intermediate to Upper intermediate With answers

37 Animals 2 : describing situations A Cats and dogs In the ' situation ' box , note how the ' if - clause ' tells you whether the idiom ... There's not enough room to swing a cat in our flat , so I don't think a party is a good idea .

English Idioms in Use  Intermediate to Upper intermediate  With answers


Surf Hellions Part 2

Not enough room to swing a cat?” Abbey-Gayle asked, with one brow raised sharply. “Yep, gotta have plenty of room to swing a cat, unless all the crew wants to get hit with the razor sharp hook.” Darius replied lightly.

Surf Hellions Part 2

Marine Biologist Harmony Stelfox, aka me, was about to reveal to the world, one of the greatest aquatic endeavors of all time. A robotic mermaid. I didn’t anticipate that things could go so terribly wrong. Was the universe trying to tell me something? I was on route to the launch pad in the North Atlantic eager to launch my little Mermaid. When my yacht fell under attack by the jaws of a Great White Shark. A man with striking dark eyes, and an outline of heavy muscle was the one to rescue me. His quick sharp movements added an element of danger. He swam with g-force speeds. Humanly impossible. And it was. He hid his secret well, he was a merman, a sworn enemy to man. But he thought, this beautiful maid had struck something within him, and he risked it all, to save my life. He laid me to rest on the deck, and dove into the sea before I awoke. Shortly after, on Hellhound Island, me and a group of bachelor party guests were sucked into a Rogue Wave. He followed us, my rescuer, but the current was strong, and he lost sight of us. After a treacherous night of terror, we were becalmed. Dead calm on a dark sea, and realized it was the Devil's Triangle. With no wind in our sails, the equipment dead, we were adrift in a thick blanket of fog. With no hope of safely going home, again.

Idiomantics The Weird and Wonderful World of Popular Phrases

NOT ENOUGH ROOM TO SWING A CAT IN. (UK). Cramped That brutal flogging implement which was once used in the British navy, the cat-o'-nine tails, is responsible for two false etymologies. One is letting the cat out of the bag (see Pig in ...

Idiomantics  The Weird and Wonderful World of Popular Phrases

Idiomantics is a unique exploration of the world of idiomatic phrases. The very etymology of the word 'idiom' reveals what's so endlessly fascinating about the wide range of colourful phrases we use in everyday speech: their peculiarity. They're peculiar both in the sense of being particular or unique to the culture from which they originate, and in the sense of being downright odd. To cite three random examples - from American English, Dutch and Italian - what on Earth are a snow job, a monkey sandwich story, and Mr Punch's secret? Fascinating and illuminating, Idiomantics explains all... The ideal gift for word buffs and in fact, anyone who enjoys a good yarn, this playful book looks at 12 groups of idioms around the world, looking at subjects such as fun and games, gastronomic delights and the daily grind.

CONCISE DICTIONARY OF IDIOMS

Not enough room to swing a cat If a room is very small, you can say that there isn't enough room to swing a cat in it. Not give a fig If you don't give a fig about something, you don't care about it at all, especially used to express ...

CONCISE DICTIONARY OF IDIOMS

If you believe idioms are a "e;tough nut to crack,"e; this Dictionary of Idioms will help you dispel that belief; you would surely abandon your opinion of idioms being a bunch of insignificant words to that of a lively one to use to attract attention of readers and listeners. You will discover 'idioms' can add beauty, remove unwanted seriousness and bring life to any conversation - written or spoken. Rightly and scientifically designed, this dictionary contains hundreds of common idioms, sayings, and expressions. Use of everyday idioms bring colour to any writing and speech. Since they don't really mean, word by word, what they say, idioms can stump even regular writers and speakers. When and where to uidioms becomes 'as easy as pie' with this Dictionary of Idioms. Alphabetical listing makes searching idioms a 'piece of cake.'Whether you are fluent in English or just a learner, this dictionary can help you read, write and speak with new understanding and a lot more fun!Special features:o Widely used and popular idioms given with meaningso Inclusion of foreign idioms currently in use in English languageo Arranged Alphabetically: A - Zo Useful grammatical information given as AppendicesAn authoritative dictionary to spice up written and oral communication for students, writers, speakers and interested readers!

Dictionary Of Idioms

None so blind as those who will not see: This idiom is used when people refuse to accept facts presented to them. ... Not enough room to swing a cat: If a room is very small, you can say that there isn't enough room to swing ...

Dictionary Of Idioms

“It rained cats and dogs”, “I know where his shoe pinches”, “Yes, it was really a blessing in disguise”… These idioms are often used in common language in our day to day talk or even correspondence. Their usage makes the communication and message to be conveyed quite effective. Dictionary defines idiom as “a group of words whose meaning is different from the meaning of the individual words.” Idiom is a combination of words with figurative meanings. It often creates a picturesque image and that image conveys the meaning. For e.g. ‘where the shoe pinches’ the image automatically creates the image of pain and trouble and the place where there is trouble. Similarly, ‘add fuel to the fire’—it creates the image of fire blazing more and the meaning of aggravation comes out. The following example is widely employed to illustrate the point.

Holy Cow

CATS. Swing. a. Cat. “Not enough room to swing a cat” means too small a space. Although the term's visual image now seems bizarre, even humorous, it was once all too literal. As we know, some cultures elevated the cat while others ...

Holy Cow

We love animals but insult humans by calling them everything from weasels or pigs to sheep, mice, chickens, sharks, snakes, and bird-brains. Animal epithets, words, and phrases are so widespread we often take them for granted or remain ignorant of the fascinating stories and facts behind them. Spanning the entire animal kingdom, Holy Cow! explains: Why hot dogs are named after canines. Why people talk turkey or go cold turkey. Why curiosity killed the cat, although dogs are more curious about us. Why letting the cat out of the bag originally referred to a duped shopper. What a horse of another color is, what horsefeathers politely alludes to, why a mule is a lady’s slipper, and what horseradish has to do with horses. Why the combination of humans and cows probably led to capitalism—its name from Latin for head, as in heads of cows. Why holy cow and sacred cow have almost opposite meanings. Whether people actually chewed the fat or ate crow (and why it’s a crowbar). How a hog became a motorcycle and a chick a young woman. What happens to freeze the balls off a brass monkey. What buck has to do with being naked. Why the birds and the bees. Why a piggy bank and why one feeds the kitty. What lame ducks have to do with U.S. presidents. How red herring came about via activists opposed to fox hunting. Where snake oil, popular in the 1800s and rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, came from. That the proverbial fly in the ointment goes back to the Bible’s Ecclesiastes (10:1). How Swiss watchmakers created teensy-weensy coaches for fleas to pull in flea circuses. And much—much!—more. Don't be a lame duck and get this book!

Getting Out Excerpts From a Cat s Diary

We have all heard the expression used when describing a small room, 'not enough room to swing a Cat,' I ask you is that a nice way to treat a Cat? Maybe it would be sufficient to just say simply that you could touch the walls of the ...

Getting Out   Excerpts From a Cat s Diary


Cats Facts Figures Fun

Not Enough Room to Swing a Cat The cat concerned was not an animal but the cat - oʻ - nine - tails , the fearsome weapon with which sailors and others were flogged . Floggings had to be inflicted on deck , because nowhere was there room ...

Cats Facts  Figures   Fun

Includes overviews of the evolution of the cat, domestication (which happened about 6000 years ago, unlike the case with dogs, who came on board about 100,000 years ago). Cats in religion, myth and superstition. The various breeds, cat trivia, cats in the movies, feline-related everyday and archaic words, phrases and sayings, the growth of cat fancying and details of the various cat associations on both sides of the Atlantic.

There's no/ not enough room to swing a cat. saying saidabout aplace or space that is very small "verb [I usually + adv/prep] us torentaroomfrom someone, or share a rented room withsomeone: At college he rooms with this guy from Nebraska ...


Forum

Not enough room to swing a cat in . Cramped quarters . There were so many of us in her office that there wasn't enough room to swing a cat in . Fight like cats and dogs . A real nasty fight . You should have seen the two of ...

Forum