Not So Virtuous Victorians

What springs to mind when you think of British Victorian men and women? - manners, manners and more manners.

Not So Virtuous Victorians

What springs to mind when you think of British Victorian men and women? - manners, manners and more manners. Behaviour that was as rigid and constricted as the corsets women wore. From iron-knicker sexual prudery to men so uptight they furtively released their pent up emotions in opium dens and prostitute hot spots. All, of course, exaggerated clichés worthy of a Victorian melodrama. Each generation loves to think it is better than the last and loves to look aghast at the horrifying trends of their ancestors. But are we really any different? This glimpse at life for Victorian men and women might make millennials think again. Men and women were expected to live very differently from one another with clearly defined roles regardless of class. However, lift the skirts a little and not only will you see that they didn't wear knickers but they were far less repressed than the persistent stereotypes would have us believe. The Victorians were as weird and wonderful as we are today. From fatal beauty tips to truly hysterical cures for hysteria to grave robbers playing skittles with human bones, we have cherry picked some of the more entertaining glimpses into the lives led by our Victorian brothers and sisters.

Not So Virtuous Victorians

The Victorian era was the period of Queen Victoria's reign, from 20 June 1837 until her death on 22 January 1901. ... Not So Virtuous Victorians offers a tantalising look behind that veil: at repressive fashion, prostitution, ...

Not So Virtuous Victorians

What springs to mind when you think of British Victorian men and women? – manners, manners and more manners. Behavior that was as rigid and constricted as the corsets women wore. From iron-knicker sexual prudery to men so uptight they furtively released their pent up emotions in opium dens and prostitute hot spots. All, of course, exaggerated clichés worthy of a Victorian melodrama. Each generation loves to think it is better than the last and loves to look aghast at the horrifying trends of their ancestors. But are we really any different? This glimpse at life for Victorian men and women might make you think again. Men and women were expected to live very differently from one another with clearly defined roles regardless of class. However, lift the skirts a little and not only will you see that they didn’t wear knickers but they were far less repressed than the persistent stereotypes would have us believe. The Victorians were as weird and wonderful as we are today. From fatal beauty tips to truly hysterical cures for hysteria to grave robbers playing skittles with human bones, we have cherry picked some of the more entertaining glimpses into the lives led by our Victorian brothers and sisters.

Not So Virtuous Victorians

What springs to mind when you think of British Victorian men and women? – manners, manners and more manners.

Not So Virtuous Victorians

What springs to mind when you think of British Victorian men and women? – manners, manners and more manners. Behavior that was as rigid and constricted as the corsets women wore. From iron-knicker sexual prudery to men so uptight they furtively released their pent up emotions in opium dens and prostitute hot spots. All, of course, exaggerated clichés worthy of a Victorian melodrama. Each generation loves to think it is better than the last and loves to look aghast at the horrifying trends of their ancestors. But are we really any different? This glimpse at life for Victorian men and women might make you think again. Men and women were expected to live very differently from one another with clearly defined roles regardless of class. However, lift the skirts a little and not only will you see that they didn’t wear knickers but they were far less repressed than the persistent stereotypes would have us believe. The Victorians were as weird and wonderful as we are today. From fatal beauty tips to truly hysterical cures for hysteria to grave robbers playing skittles with human bones, we have cherry picked some of the more entertaining glimpses into the lives led by our Victorian brothers and sisters.

Disreputable Pleasures

Less Virtuous Victorians at Play Mike Huggins, J. A. Mangan. bargaining, not as a form of class conflict, but as part of the process of improving the status of its members. Such a move required not just money, but also respectability.

Disreputable Pleasures

Many historians have claimed that respectability was the sharpest line of social division in Victorian society, even that the line between the 'respectable' and 'unrespectable' was more significant than between rich and poor. This irreverent and revisionist collection argues that they have over-polarised Victorian attitudes and challenges the conventional view that middle-class Victorian leisure had a respectable and serious purpose and approach. Disreputable Pleasures explores the more sinful and unrespectable Victorian male sporting pleasures, demonstrating the complex interrelationships between such value as manliness, muscularity and machismo, or sensuality, virility and hedonism. It sheds light on the ways in which the public rhetoric of Victorian respectability could be rendered problematic by the practical pursuit of private pleasures. It shows that Victorian leisure was much more contested cultural space than has been recognised, a battleground whose contestants ranged from the rational recreationalist to the avowedly hedonistic, and from the sacred to the profane. Disreputable Pleasures poses a powerful challenge to the accepted public image of Victorian society and will greatly add to our present understanding of Victorian Britain.

Understanding the Victorians

Victoria was not the first queen to be represented as a virtuous wife and mother above all – Queen Charlotte (1744–1818), wife of George III, had presented herself as virtuous and maternal and portrayed the royal family as domestic, ...

Understanding the Victorians

"The Victorian era was a time of dramatic change. During this period Britain ruled the largest empire on earth, witnessed the expansion of democracy, and developed universal education and mass print culture. Both its imperial might and the fact that it had industrialised and urbanised decades before any other nation allowed it to dominate world politics and culture in many ways for the better part of the nineteenth century. Understanding the Victorians paints a vivid portrait of the era, combines broad survey with close analysis, and introduces students to the critical debates taking place among historians today. It emphasises class, gender, and racial and imperial positioning as constitutive of human relations, including the social, economic, cultural, political, and legal. Starting with the Queen Caroline Affair in 1820 and coming right up to the start of World War I in 1914, Steinbach's thematic chapters take in, amongst other things, the economy, gender, religion, the history of science and ideas, material culture and sexuality. With a clear introduction outlining the key themes of the period, including the issue of periodization, and with chronologies and suggestions for further reading, this is the ideal companion for all students of the nineteenth century"--

Understanding the Victorians

Victoria was not the first queen to be represented as a virtuous wife and mother above all—Queen Charlotte (1744–1818), wife of George III, had presented herself as virtuous and maternal and portrayed the royal family as domestic, ...

Understanding the Victorians

Understanding the Victorians paints a vivid portrait of this era of dramatic change, combining broad survey with close analysis and introducing students to the critical debates taking place among historians today. Encompassing all of Great Britain and Ireland over the whole of the Victorian period, it gives prominence to social and cultural topics alongside politics and economics and emphasises class, gender, and racial and imperial positioning as constitutive of human relations. This second edition is fully updated throughout, containing a new chapter on leisure in the Victorian period, the most recent historiographical research in Victorian Studies, and enhanced coverage of imperialism and working-class life. Starting with the Queen Caroline Affair in 1820 and coming up to the start of World War I in 1914, Susie L. Steinbach uses thematic chapters to discuss and evaluate topics such as politics, imperialism, the economy, class, gender, the monarchy, arts and entertainment, religion, sexuality, religion, and science. There are also three chapters on space, consumption, and the law, topics rarely covered at this introductory level. With a clear introduction outlining the key themes of the period, a detailed timeline, and suggestions for further reading and relevant internet resources, this is the ideal companion for all students of the nineteenth century.

Delphi Complete Works of G K Chesterton Illustrated

... ever thought it was compatible with Victorian virtue; and many very virtuous Victorians did. But they only tolerated this social solution as an exception; and many other modern social solutions they would not have tolerated at all.

Delphi Complete Works of G  K  Chesterton  Illustrated

One of the greatest writers of his time, G. K. Chesterton’s short stories, novels, poetry and essays demonstrate his unparalleled versatility in literature. This comprehensive eBook offers readers the complete fictional works of G. K. Chesterton, with numerous illustrations, rare texts, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 2) Features: * concise introductions to the novels and other works * the complete Father Brown stories, including the very rare stories * the original Father Brown illustrations * ALL the novels, with contents tables * images of how the novels first appeared, giving your eReader a taste of the Edwardian texts * special chronological and alphabetical contents tables for the poetry * rare plays and poetry * features 43 non-fiction books, each with contents tables * unique uncollected essays section, with rare articles by the great essayist * includes Chesterton’s autobiography– explore the writer’s literary life! * features a special criticism section, with four works examining Chesterton’s contribution to literature, including Patrick Braybrooke’s seminal work GILBERT KEITH CHESTERTON * many images relating to Chesterton’s life, works, places and film adaptations * scholarly ordering of texts in chronological order and literary genres, allowing easy navigation around Chesterton’s immense oeuvre Please note: due to copyright restrictions and the scarcity of some minor texts, this is a complete FICTIONAL works of Chesterton, with the almost complete non-fiction works. As soon as more texts become available, they will be added as free updates for customers who have already purchased this eBook. CONTENTS: Father Brown Stories THE INNOCENCE OF FATHER BROWN THE WISDOM OF FATHER BROWN THE INCREDULITY OF FATHER BROWN THE SECRET OF FATHER BROWN THE SCANDAL OF FATHER BROWN UNCOLLECTED FATHER BROWN STORIES Index of Father Brown Stories The Novels THE NAPOLEON OF NOTTING HILL THE MAN WHO WAS THURSDAY THE BALL AND THE CROSS MANALIVE THE FLYING INN THE RETURN OF DON QUIXOTE Short Story Collections THE CLUB OF QUEER TRADES THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH AND OTHER STORIES TALES OF THE LONG BOW THE POET AND THE LUNATICS FOUR FAULTLESS FELONS THE PARADOXES OF MR. POND UNCOLLECTED SHORT STORIES The Short Stories LIST OF SHORT STORIES IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER LIST OF SHORT STORIES IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER The Plays MAGIC THE JUDGMENT OF DR. JOHNSON THE TURKEY AND THE TURK The Poetry Collections GREYBEARDS AT PLAY THE WILD KNIGHT AND OTHER POEMS THE BALLAD OF THE WHITE HORSE POEMS WINE, WATER AND SONG THE BALLAD OF ST. BARBARA AND OTHER POEMS GLORIA IN PROFUNDIS UBI ECCLESIA THE GRAVE OF ARTHUR The Poems LIST OF POEMS IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER LIST OF POEMS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER The Non-Fiction THE DEFENDANT ROBERT BROWNING TWELVE TYPES HERETICS VARIED TYPES CHARLES DICKENS ALL THINGS CONSIDERED TREMENDOUS TRIFLES ORTHODOXY WHAT’S WRONG WITH THE WORLD GEORGE BERNARD SHAW APPRECIATIONS AND CRITICISMS OF THE WORKS OF CHARLES DICKENS ALARMS AND DISCURSIONS A MISCELLANY OF MEN THE VICTORIAN AGE IN LITERATURE THE APPETITE OF TYRANNY THE CRIMES OF ENGLAND LORD KITCHENER UTOPIA OF USURERS AND OTHER ESSAYS A SHORT HISTORY OF ENGLAND IRISH IMPRESSIONS THE SUPERSTITION OF DIVORCE THE NEW JERUSALEM WHAT I SAW IN AMERICA EUGENICS AND OTHER EVILS ST. FRANCIS FANCIES VERSUS FADS THE EVERLASTING MAN WILLIAM COBBETT THE CATHOLIC CHURCH AND CONVERSION THE OUTLINE OF SANITY ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON DO WE AGREE? THE THING COME TO THINK OF IT ALL IS GRIST ST. THOMAS AQUINAS ALL I SURVEY: A BOOK OF ESSAYS THE WELL AND THE SHALLOWS THE GLASS WALKING STICK AS I WAS SAYING THE COMMON MAN THE SPICE OF LIFE THE APOSTLE AND THE WILD DUCKS AND OTHER ESSAYS UNCOLLECTED ESSAYS The Criticism MR. G.K. CHESTERTON AND MR. HILAIRE BELLOC by Robert Lynd G. K. CHESTERTON, A CRITICAL STUDY by Julius West and more

The Victorian Historical Novel 1840 1880

I never heard anything so cold and insipid (I hope it is not wrong to say so), as the compositions read by my companions ... as far as he dared, the voices and opinions of virtuous Victorians, but like the villains of the novel they are ...

The Victorian Historical Novel 1840   1880


Victorian Suicide

In Gilbert's accompanying sketch, he certainly looks a very dead one as well. Here Gilbert confronts not so much greed or dishonesty, but excess, self-delusion, futile reliance on willpower, and the tendency to overdo that marked so ...

Victorian Suicide

When Viscount Castlereagh, leader of the House of Commons and architect of the Grand Alliance, committed suicide in 1822, the coroner's inquest could consider only two legal verdicts: insanity or self-murder. Public outrage greeted his burial in Westminster Abbey; the tradition lingered that a suicide's burial place be at a crossroads, with a stake through the heart to keep the lost soul from wandering. Probing a remarkable variety of sources and individual cases, Barbara Gates shows how attitudes toward suicide changed between Castlereagh's death and the end of the century. By 1900 the Victorians' moral censure of suicide and the accompanying denial that it was a widespread problem had been replaced by a more compassionate response--and also by an unfounded belief in a "suicide epidemic," which Thomas Hardy described as a "coming universal wish not to live.". Exposing a rich area of interaction between history and literature, and utilizing the methodology of the new historicism, Gates discusses topics ranging from the plot for Wuthering Heights to Victorian shilling shockers. Among other findings she includes evidence that Victorian middle-class men, particularly, tended to make suicide the province of other selves--of men belonging to other times or places, of "monsters," or of women. Originally published in 1988. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

The G K Chesterton Collection II 65 Books

To–day, when I see the stranger walking down the street, I should not bet that he believes even in clothes. ... order to understand how anybody ever thought it was compatible with Victorian virtue; and many very virtuous Victorians did.

The G  K  Chesterton Collection II  65 Books

THE G. K. CHESTERTON COLLECTION [65 BOOKS] G. K. CHESTERTON — 65 Books in One: 27 Non-Fiction, 17 Fiction, 11 Biographies, 4 Poetry, 2 Plays, 3 Critiques, 1 Introduction — Over 3.2 Million Words in one E-Book — Includes an Active Index to all books and 65 Table of Contents for each book — Includes Illustrations by Claude Monet Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874–1936) was an English writer. He wrote on philosophy, ontology, poetry, plays, journalism, public lectures and debates, literary and art criticism, biography, Christian apologetics, and fiction, including fantasy and detective fiction. Chesterton is often referred to as the "prince of paradox". Whenever possible, Chesterton made his points with popular sayings, proverbs, and allegories—first carefully turning them inside out. Chesterton is well known for his reasoned apologetics and even some of those who disagree with him have recognized the universal appeal of such works as Orthodoxy and The Everlasting Man. Chesterton, as a political thinker, cast aspersions on both progressivism and conservatism, saying, "The whole modern world has divided itself into Conservatives and Progressives. The business of Progressives is to go on making mistakes. The business of the Conservatives is to prevent the mistakes from being corrected." Chesterton routinely referred to himself as an "orthodox" Christian, and came to identify such a position more and more with Catholicism, eventually converting to Roman Catholicism from High Church Anglicanism. George Bernard Shaw, Chesterton's "friendly enemy" said of him, "He was a man of colossal genius". INCLUDED BOOKS: GILBERT KEITH CHESTERTON —NON-FICTION— THE EVERLASTING MAN THE CATHOLIC CHURCH AND CONVERSION THE THING THE OUTLINE OF SANITY THE WELL AND THE SHALLOWS HERETICS ORTHODOXY WHAT’S WRONG WITH THE WORLD WHAT I SAW IN AMERICA THE NEW JERUSALEM IRISH IMPRESSIONS A SHORT HISTORY OF ENGLAND EUGENICS AND OTHER EVILS THE SUPERSTITION OF DIVORCE THE APPETITE OF TYRANNY THE CRIMES OF ENGLAND THE BLATCHFORD CONTROVERSIES THE VICTORIAN AGE IN LITERATURE A MISCELLANY OF MEN ALARMS AND DISCURSIONS ALL THINGS CONSIDERED THE DEFENDANT TREMENDOUS TRIFLES UTOPIA OF USURERS AND OTHER ESSAYS THE USES OF DIVERSITY ESSAYS BY CHESTERTON A CHESTERTON CALENDAR —FICTION— THE INNOCENCE OF FATHER BROWN THE WISDOM OF FATHER BROWN THE INCREDULITY OF FATHER BROWN THE SECRET OF FATHER BROWN THE SCANDAL OF FATHER BROWN TALES OF THE LONG BOW THE MAN WHO WAS THURSDAY THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH THE NAPOLEON OF NOTTING HILL THE FLYING INN MANALIVE THE BALL AND THE CROSS THE PARADOXES OF MR POND FOUR FAULTLESS FELONS THE CLUB OF QUEER TRADES THE TREES OF PRIDE OTHER STORIES —BIOGRAPHY— AUTOBIOGRAPHY SAINT FRANCIS OF ASSISI SAINT THOMAS AQUINAS VARIED TYPES CHARLES DICKENS APPRECIATIONS AND CRITICISMS OF THE WORKS OF CHARLES DICKENS GEORGE BERNARD SHAW ROBERT BROWNING WILLIAM BLAKE G.F. WATTS BIOGRAPHIES BY CHESTERTON —POETRY— THE BALLAD OF THE WHITE HORSE THE BALLAD OF SAINT BARBARA THE WILD KNIGHT AND OTHER POEMS GREYBEARDS AT PLAY —PLAYS— MAGIC THE TURKEY AND THE TURK —CRITIQUES— GILBERT KEITH CHESTERTON by Cecil Chesterton GILBERT KEITH CHESTERTON by Patrick Braybrooke OTHER G. K. CHESTERTON CRITIQUES PUBLISHER: CATHOLIC WAY PUBLISHING

AKASHVANI

Nothing will disturb his confidence that that he declared that the expansion of the Empire went hand in hand with the expansion of the Empress; he subjected Victorian virtues to hard questioning. Were the virtues themselves so virtuous ...

AKASHVANI

"Akashvani" (English) is a programme journal of ALL INDIA RADIO, it was formerly known as The Indian Listener. It used to serve the listener as a bradshaw of broadcasting ,and give listener the useful information in an interesting manner about programmes, who writes them, take part in them and produce them along with photographs of performing artists. It also contains the information of major changes in the policy and service of the organisation. The Indian Listener (fortnightly programme journal of AIR in English) published by The Indian State Broadcasting Service, Bombay, started on 22 December, 1935 and was the successor to the Indian Radio Times in English, which was published beginning in July 16 of 1927. From 22 August ,1937 onwards, it used to published by All India Radio, New Delhi. From 1950,it was turned into a weekly journal. Later, The Indian listener became "Akashvani" (English ) w.e.f. January 5, 1958. It was made fortnightly journal again w.e.f July 1,1983. NAME OF THE JOURNAL: AKASHVANI LANGUAGE OF THE JOURNAL: English DATE, MONTH & YEAR OF PUBLICATION: 31JANUARY, 1965 PERIODICITY OF THE JOURNAL: Weekly NUMBER OF PAGES: 68 VOLUME NUMBER: Vol. XXX, No.5 BROADCAST PROGRAMME SCHEDULE PUBLISHED (PAGE NOS): 13-67 ARTICLE: 1. Nehru And The Scientific Temper 2. The Art of Venkataswamy Naidu 3. Humanities For The Technocrat 4. Role of National Development Council 5. Debunking AUTHOR: 1. Dr. H. J. Bhabha 2. N. S. Ramachandran 3. Prof. M. S. Thacker 4. B. K. R . Kabad 5. H. Y. Sharada Prasad KEYWORDS : 1.Attitude towards science, complementary approaches, aesthetic experiences, integral vision of life, no barriers 2.Early recognition,one of the elect, unforgettable experience 3.Natural apprehension, difficult question, first necessary step, 4.Extraordinarily casual approach, difference to the fore, centre's stand on rationing, more active role needed, interesting trend 5.Ford debunks History, greatest of them all Document ID : APE-1965 (J-A) Vol-I-05 Prasar Bharati Archives has the copyright in all matters published in this “AKASHVANI” and other AIR journals. For reproduction previous permission is essential.

The Greatest Works of G K Chesterton

... ever thought it was compatible with Victorian virtue; and many very virtuous Victorians did. But they only tolerated this social solution as an exception; and many other modern social solutions they would not have tolerated at all.

The Greatest Works of G  K  Chesterton

Musaicum Books presents to you a meticulously edited G. K. Chesterton collection. This ebook has been designed and formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices. Content: The Father Brown Books: The Innocence of Father Brown The Wisdom of Father Brown The Incredulity of Father Brown The Secret of Father Brown The Scandal of Father Brown The Donnington Affair The Mask of Midas Novels: The Napoleon of Notting Hill The Man who was Thursday The Ball and the Cross Manalive The Flying Inn The Return of Don Quixote Short Stories: The Club of Queer Trades The Man Who Knew Too Much The Trees of Pride Tales of the Long Bow The Poet and the Lunatics Four Faultless Felons The Paradoxes of Mr. Pond The White Pillars Murder The Sword of Wood Poetry: Greybeards At Play The Wild Knight and Other Poems Wine, Water, and Song Poems, 1916 The Ballad of St. Barbara and Other Verses The Ballad of the White Horse Gloria in Profundis Ubi Ecclesia Rotarians Plays: Magic – A Fantastic Comedy The Turkey and the Turk Literary Criticism: A Defence of Penny Dreadfuls Appreciations and Criticisms of the Works of Charles Dickens The Victorian Age in Literature Charles Dickens - Critical Study Hilaire Belloc Robert Louis Stevenson Historical Works: A Short History of England The Barbarism of Berlin Letters to an Old Garibaldian The Crimes of England The New Jerusalem Theological Works: Heretics Orthodoxy The Everlasting Man The Catholic Church and Conversion Eugenics and other Evils Essays: The Defendant Varied Types All Things Considered Tremendous Trifles What's Wrong with the World Miscellany of Men Divorce versus Democracy The Superstition of Divorce The Uses of Diversity Fancies Versus Fads The Outline of Sanity The Thing Come to Think All is Grist As I was Saying Autobiography by G. K. Chesterton G. K. Chesterton – A Critical Study by Julius West

The Complete Works

... ever thought it was compatible with Victorian virtue; and many very virtuous Victorians did. But they only tolerated this social solution as an exception; and many other modern social solutions they would not have tolerated at all.

The Complete Works

Musaicum Books presents to you a meticulously edited G. K. Chesterton collection: The Father Brown Stories: The Innocence of Father Brown The Wisdom of Father Brown The Incredulity of Father Brown The Secret of Father Brown The Scandal of Father Brown The Donnington Affair The Mask of Midas Novels: The Napoleon of Notting Hill The Man who was Thursday The Ball and the Cross Manalive The Flying Inn The Return of Don Quixote Short Stories: The Club of Queer Trades The Man Who Knew Too Much The Trees of Pride Tales of the Long Bow The Poet and the Lunatics Four Faultless Felons The Paradoxes of Mr. Pond The White Pillars Murder The Sword of Wood Poetry: Greybeards At Play The Wild Knight and Other Poems Wine, Water, and Song Poems, 1916 The Ballad of St. Barbara and Other Verses The Ballad of the White Horse Gloria in Profundis Ubi Ecclesia Rotarians Plays: Magic – A Fantastic Comedy The Turkey and the Turk Literary Criticism: A Defence of Penny Dreadfuls Appreciations and Criticisms of the Works of Charles Dickens The Victorian Age in Literature Charles Dickens - Critical Study Hilaire Belloc Robert Louis Stevenson Historical Works: A Short History of England The Barbarism of Berlin Letters to an Old Garibaldian The Crimes of England The New Jerusalem Theological Works: Heretics Orthodoxy The Everlasting Man The Catholic Church and Conversion Eugenics and other Evils Essays: The Defendant Varied Types All Things Considered Tremendous Trifles What's Wrong with the World Alarms and Discursions A Miscellany of Men Divorce versus Democracy Utopia of Usurers and Other Essays The Superstition of Divorce The Uses of Diversity Fancies Versus Fads The Outline of Sanity The Thing Come to Think All is Grist Sidelights on New London and Newer York All I Survey The Well and the Shallows As I was Saying Other Essays… Travel Sketches: Irish Impressions What I Saw in America Biographical Works Autobiography by G. K. Chesterton G. K. Chesterton – A Critical Study by Julius West

ESSENCE OF LITERATURE

Nightingale, Thomas Arnold and General G. G. Gordon, which appeared under the title, “Eminent Victorians”. ... he must be involved in human beings as human beings, and not merely in human beings as virtuous human beings; he must not ...

ESSENCE OF LITERATURE

Essential of Literature Thought, Feeling, Imagination and beauty are the essential ingredients of literature. Literature is one among the foremost powerful instruments for forming character. Writers teach us to understand man and know attribute. “Literature may be a record of the simplest thoughts.” - Emerson. Literature is that the artistic expression of thought which is replete with feeling and imagination. “Literature consists of all the books where moral truth and human passion are touched with a selected largeness, sanity and attraction of form.” - Lord Morley. Literature heightens our awareness of human life. Literature enables us to seem at nature with new eyes. Literature interprets with charm of language the experiences and spiritual intuitions of man. Writers teach us to understand man and know attribute. “Great literature is straightforward language charged with going to the utmost possible degree.” - Emerson. Literature could also be a record of man’s dreams and ideals, his hopes and aspirations, his failures and disappointments, his motives and passions, his experiences and observations. It appeals to the widest human interests and thus the only human emotions. It knows no nationality, nor any bounds save those of humanity. In a nutshell, thought, feeling, imagination and beauty of style and form are all equally essential to literature. Here we quote, Lowes Dickinson, “To feel, and in order to express, or at least to understand the expression of all that is lovely in Nature, of all that is poignant and sensitive in man, is to us in itself a sufficient end. A rose in a moonlight garden, the shadow of trees on the turf, almond blossom, scent of pine, the wine cup and guitar, these are the pathos of life and death- to all or any this stuff we are trained to reply , and therefore the response is what we call literature.

Victorian Investments

(Fabian 3, 61) This essay argues that a similar, but not identical, process was occurring in Victorian England. As was the case in America, speculative trading would only be accepted once it was purged of an association with gambling.

Victorian Investments

Victorian Investments explores the relationship between the financial system in Great Britain and other aspects of Victorian society and culture. Building on the special journal issue of Victorian Studies devoted to Victorian investments, this volume is the first to define an interdisciplinary field of study emerging in the space between Marxist critiques of capitalism and traditional histories of business and economics. The contributors demonstrate how phenomena such as the expansion of colonial and foreign markets, the broadening of the investor base through the advent of limited liability, and the rise of financial journalism gave rise to a "culture of investment" that affected Victorian Britons at every level of society and influenced every kind of cultural production. Drawing together work by prominent historians as well as literary and cultural critics, Victorian Investments both defines the methodologies and perspectives that characterize an existing body of scholarship and pushes that scholarship in new directions, demonstrating the signal role of economic developments in Victorian culture and society.

Family Matters Catholic Theology of the Family

As in that one matter of modesty, or the mere externals of sex, so in all the deeper matters of sex, the modern will ... understand how anybody ever thought it was compatible with Victorian virtue; and many very virtuous Victorians did.

Family Matters  Catholic Theology of the Family

The present work mainly uses reason and Holy Scripture in order to explicate Catholic moral theology, in the areas of sexuality, gender, and the family. Far from being a merely "moralistic" or "puritanical" or "Victorian" sort of outlook (often perceived by many as a set of unnecessary, stifling, negative rules), Catholic moral theology is based on what God has revealed to us in His inspired Word, the Bible, and is a positive teaching about who man is, and what fulfills him, in accordance with God's purpose for His children, made in His image. It is my hope and prayer that this book will help Catholics to better understand the rationale behind their own Church's sometimes difficult-to-live-out beliefs concerning personal and institutional morality, and aid non-Catholics in finding common ground with Catholic moral teaching, and to better appreciate it, even where they find themselves in disagreement.

The Countess and Her Daughter

They have shown where it hurts, and I'll try not to bruise those sensitive spots. I was told I must behave like a virtuous Victorian lady.” “Were the Victorians morally and socially really that virtuous?” “I can't remember.

The Countess and Her Daughter

The story of Countess Maria and her daughter Sylvia is moving between heady experiences and bottomless desperations. Pampered by wealth and social refinements in Hungary, they are unprepared for the chaos at the end of the Second World War. Hunger, hopelessness and tribulations follow, but eventually they are given a chance to emigrate to the United States, where they build a new, rich life, almost equaling that, which they left behind. After Sylvia's husband dies, she visits the old home, or what is left of it. There she is the victim of contradictory and very strong impressions, but also finds love, which gives new meaning to her life. In this, her third book, the author explores various attitudes which make or break a relationship, and delves into the emotional depths of mature love as experienced by two interesting individuals. Although her main focus is to show how various characters react to the vicissitudes of life, she also writes about the war, the horror of fleeing, and of being displaced: about the little known history of millions.

Catholic Fiction and Social Reality in Ireland 1873 1922

They eschewed anything that made them stand out . It was not a recipe for artistic originality . The principal vehicle for their self - promotion as virtuous Victorians was the romantic comedy . Apparently bland and anodyne in their ...

Catholic Fiction and Social Reality in Ireland  1873 1922

Explores the outlook of certain important classes in late 19th- and early 20th-century Ireland through an assessment of Irish Catholic fiction.

Victorian Murderesses

But he guards the woman from all this; within his house, as ruled by her, [...], need enter no danger, no temptation, no cause of error or offense.” As virtuous homemakers and mothers, “the angels of the house” had supposedly nothing to ...

Victorian Murderesses

Victorian Murderesses investigates the politics of female violence in Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles (1891), George Eliot’s Adam Bede (1859), Mary Braddon’s Lady Audley’s Secret (1862), and Florence Marryat’s The Blood of the Vampire (1897). The controversial figure of the murderess in these four novels challenges the assumption that women are essentially nurturing and passive and that violence and aggression are exclusively male traits. By focusing on the representations of murder committed by women, this book demonstrates how legal and even medical discourses endorsed Victorian domestic ideology, as female criminals were often locked up in asylums and publicly executed without substantial evidence. While paying close attention to the social, economic, judicial, and political dynamics of Victorian England, this interdisciplinary study also tackles the question of female agency, as the novels simultaneously portray women as perpetrators of murder and excuse their socially unacceptable traits of anger and violence by invoking heredity and madness. Although the four novels tend to undercut female power and attribute violence to adulterous women, they are revolutionary enough to deploy female characters who rebel against male sovereignty and their domestic roles by stabbing their rapists and even killing their newborns. Victorian studies on gender and violence focus primarily on female victims of sexual harassment, and real and fictional male killers like Dracula and Jack the Ripper. Victorian Murderesses contributes to the field by investigating how literary representations of female violence counter the idealisation of women as angelic housewives.

Victorian Fiction

And that society was full of submerged violence , potential madness , charlatans and hypocrites and not so virtuous young ladies . But Trollope is no more accurate a " reflector " of society than Dickens or George Eliot , and " realism ...

Victorian Fiction

A collection of twenty-three critical essays on English fiction from 1830 to 1880.