Of Time and the River

Of Time and the River


OF TIME AND THE RIVER

A Legend of Man's Hunger in His Youth Thomas Wolfe. great deal of the falseness, hypocrisy and sentimentality of the South was polished off in these episodes, and “the war”— the Civil War — was used effectively as a stalking-horse to ...

OF TIME AND THE RIVER

This eBook has been formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices. Of Time and the River is an autobiographical novel, the continuation of the story of Eugene Gant, detailing his early and mid-twenties. During that time Eugene attends Harvard University, moves to New York City, teaches English at a university there, and travels overseas with his friend Francis Starwick.

Study Guide to Look Homeward Angel and Of Time and the River by Thomas Wolfe

multidimensioned characters who fit his mythic view of life. The subtitle of the novel, “A Legend of Man's Hunger in His Youth,” indicates that Wolfe intends to formulate patterns of yearning and growth of such scope as to provide a ...

Study Guide to Look Homeward  Angel  and Of Time and the River by Thomas Wolfe

A comprehensive study guide offering in-depth explanation, essay, and test prep for selected works by Thomas Wolfe, skilled writer of impressionistic prose. Titles in this study guide include Look Homeward, Angel, and Of Time and the River. As a collection of mid-twentieth-century novels, Wolfe’s work displayed his quest for authority, fellowship, literary success, and identity. Moreover, Wolfe used his imagination to heighten and adapt every detail from his memories. This Bright Notes Study Guide explores the context and history of Wolfe’s classic work, helping students to thoroughly explore the reasons they have stood the literary test of time. Each Bright Notes Study Guide contains: - Introductions to the Author and the Work - Character Summaries - Plot Guides - Section and Chapter Overviews - Test Essay and Study Q&As The Bright Notes Study Guide series offers an in-depth tour of more than 275 classic works of literature, exploring characters, critical commentary, historical background, plots, and themes. This set of study guides encourages readers to dig deeper in their understanding by including essay questions and answers as well as topics for further research.

To Loot My Life Clean

Carl Van Doren Of Time and the River A Legend of Man's Hunger in His Youth THOMAS WOLFE Thomas Wolfe author of LOOK HOMEWARD , ANGEL In this novel Thomas Wolfe reaffirms the tribute of Sinclair Lewis in his Nobel Prize acceptance speech ...

To Loot My Life Clean

The relationship between Thomas Wolfe and his editor, Maxwell Perkins has been the subject of guesswork and anecdote for 70 years. Scholars have debated Wolfe's dependence on his editor. This volume of 251 letters should clarify the relationship and set the record straight.

The National Union Catalog Pre 1956 Imprints

Of time and the river ; a legend of man's hunger in his youth . Grosset and Dunlap [ c1935 ] 912p . 24cm . New York , Wisdom AC9 W8227 935 on Wolfe , Thomas , 1900-1938 . Of time and the river , a legend of men's hunger in his youth by ...

The National Union Catalog  Pre 1956 Imprints


The Sons of Maxwell Perkins

Letters of F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Thomas Wolfe, and Their Editor Maxwell Evarts Perkins, ... Of Time and the River 33.00 LOOK HOMEWARD , ANGEL by Thomas Wolf OF A Legend of Man's Hunger in His Youth Of Time and the River ...

The Sons of Maxwell Perkins

The relationships between legendary Scribner's editor Maxwell Perkins and three of his most important authors--Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Thomas Wolfe--are captured in a remarkable series of more than two hundred letters that speak out on such topics as the art of writing, editing, publishing, personal rivalries, and more.

HSA Heritage Auctions Rare Books Auction Catalog 6030

Wolfe's First Novel in the First State Dust Jacket Wolfe's Sequel to His Legendary First Novel LOOK HOMEWARD , ANGEL OF TIME AND THE RIVER OF TIME AND THE RIVER A LEGEND OF MANS HUNGER IN HIS YOUTH WOLFE Thomas Wolfe of time and the ...

HSA Heritage Auctions Rare Books Auction Catalog  6030


The Concise Oxford Companion to American Literature

Of Time and the River: A Legend of Man's Hunger in His Youth, semi-autobiographical novel by Thomas Wolfe, . published in 1935 as a sequel to Look Homeward, Angel. . Eugene Gant leaves his Southern home for graduate work at Harvard, ...

The Concise Oxford Companion to American Literature

This concise version contains brief biographies of important authors, plot summaries of individual works, descriptions of important literary movements, and a wealth of information on other aspects of American literary life and history from the Colonial period to the modern era.

Leaving the South

When Thomas Wolfe began writing his novel Of Time and the River: A Legend of Man's Hunger in His Youth (1935), the theme of wandering and of placelessness had already become well established in his work. There's no doubt as well that he ...

Leaving the South

Millions of southerners left the South in the twentieth century in a mass migration that has, in many ways, rewoven the fabric of American society on cultural, political, and economic levels. Because the movements of southerners--and people in general--are controlled not only by physical boundaries marked on a map but also by narratives that define movement, narrative is central in building and sustaining borders and in breaking them down. In Leaving the South: Border Crossing Narratives and the Remaking of Southern Identity, author Mary Weaks-Baxter analyzes narratives by and about those who left the South and how those narratives have remade what it means to be southern. Drawing from a broad range of narratives, including literature, newspaper articles, art, and music, Weaks-Baxter outlines how these displacement narratives challenged concepts of southern nationhood and redefined southern identity. Close attention is paid to how depictions of the South, particularly in the media and popular culture, prompted southerners to leave the region and changed perceptions of southerners to outsiders as well as how southerners saw themselves. Through an examination of narrative, Weaks-Baxter reveals the profound effect gender, race, and class have on the nature of the migrant's journey, the adjustment of the migrant, and the ultimate decision of the migrant either to stay put or return home, and connects the history of border crossings to the issues being considered in today's national landscape.

Look Abroad Angel

... maddening and insatiable hunger that informs much of Wolfe's writing, in particular his long second novel, Of Time and the River: A Legend of Man's Hunger in His Youth (1935). Of Time and the River is full of unsatisfiable yearning, ...

Look Abroad  Angel

Born in Asheville, North Carolina, Thomas Wolfe (1900-1938) was one of the most influential southern writers, widely considered to rival his contemporary, William Faulkner--who believed Wolfe to be one of the greatest talents of their generation. His novels-- including Look Homeward, Angel (1929); Of Time and the River (1935); and the posthumously published The Web and the Rock (1939) and You Can't Go Home Again (1940)--remain touchstones of U.S. literature. In Look Abroad, Angel, Jedidiah Evans uncovers the "global Wolfe," reconfiguring Wolfe's supposedly intractable homesickness for the American South as a form of longing that is instead indeterminate and expansive. Instead of promoting and reinforcing a narrow and cloistered formulation of the writer as merely southern or Appalachian, Evans places Wolfe in transnational contexts, examining Wolfe's impact and influence throughout Europe. In doing so, he de-territorializes the response to Wolfe's work, revealing the writer as a fundamentally global presence within American literature.

The Railroad in American Fiction

Of Time and the River: A Legend of Man's Hunger in His Youth. New York: Scribner's, ¡935.9¡2p. The novel's subtitle nearly says it all about this work. In this, his last novel published before his death, Wolfe's alter ego Eugene Gant ...

The Railroad in American Fiction

Nothing better represented the early spirit of American expansion than the railroad. Dominant in daily life as well as in the popular imagination, the railroad appealed strongly to creative writers. For many years, fiction of railroad life and travel was plentiful and varied. As the nineteenth century receded, the railroad's allure faded, as did railroad fiction. Today, it is hard to sense what the railroad once meant to Americans. The fiction of the railroad—often by railroaders themselves—recaptures that sense, and provides valuable insights on American cultural history. This extensively annotated bibliography lists and discusses in 956 entries novels and short stories from the 1840s to the present in which the railroad is important. Each entry includes plot and character description to help the reader make an informed decision on the source's merit. A detailed introduction discusses the history of railroad fiction and highlights common themes such as strikes, hoboes, and the roles of women and African-Americans. Such writers of “pure” railroad fiction as Harry Bedwell, Frank Packard, and Cy Warman are well represented, along with such literary artists as Mark Twain, Thomas Wolfe, Flannery O’Connor, and Ellen Glasgow. Work by minority writers, including Jean Toomer, Richard Wright, Frank Chin, and Toni Morrison, also receives close attention. An appendix organizes entries by decade of publication, and the work is indexed by subject and title.

Studies in Irreversibility

Rod Horton and Herbert Edwards, Backgrounds of American Literary Thought (New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, 1974), 73–74; Thomas Wolfe, Of Time and the River: A Legend of Man's Hunger in His Youth (New York: Scribner's, 1935), 650.

Studies in Irreversibility

The premise of Studies in Irreversibility: Texts and Contexts is that there is a big difference between phenomena, practices, processes, and events that are irreversible and those that are reversible, and moreover that this difference and its manifold implications remain underappreciated so long as the analysis of culture continues to anchor itself in an emphasis on the capacities of human agency. If messianic modes posit a future to justify the present, and so interpret the influence of the past, the papers in this collection are devoted to examining the present of experience from the perspective of its uncompromising and irreducible past, finding in irreversibility a key to an interpretation of futurity. Together, these papers outline a method of examining experience as something more—or at least other—than the desire to know it, and in so doing they shed light on the powerful role of normativity in the narratives we construct in and about culture. Through novel analyses from the disciplines of literature, art criticism, history, philosophy, ethnic studies, and ethics, the contributors to this book address key questions about the nature of irreversibility: What differentiates the experience of the irreversible from the experience of the reversible? How is irreversibility recognized? What happens when we acknowledge something to be irreversible? How has society contended with irreversibility, and what sorts of tools exist today to interpret its significance? Wary of impetuously fixing the meaning of a still-elusive concept, this volume collects papers that employ a wide array of methodologies, mindful that no one critical approach may yet have proved itself. Irreversibility is not simply a quality of the texts examined in this volume, nor is it strictly speaking a lens through which otherwise coherent or stable texts are examined; rather, it emerges as a model that brings together texts and the thinking of them. By together outlining a method of examining culture that moves beyond reliance on tropes such as functionalism, teleology, and chance, tropes that have dominated twentieth century cultural analysis, these papers help to inaugurate a new paradigm in the study of culture.

The Penguin Modern Classics Book

Of Time and the River A Legend of Man's Hunger in His Youth 1935 This voluminous sequel to Look Homeward, Angel took Maxwell Perkins two years to edit. Eugene Gant is still isolated and over-sensitive, but he is nonetheless filled with ...

The Penguin Modern Classics Book

The essential guide to twentieth-century literature around the world For six decades the Penguin Modern Classics series has been an era-defining, ever-evolving series of books, encompassing works by modernist pioneers, avant-garde iconoclasts, radical visionaries and timeless storytellers. This reader's companion showcases every title published in the series so far, with more than 1,800 books and 600 authors, from Achebe and Adonis to Zamyatin and Zweig. It is the essential guide to twentieth-century literature around the world, and the companion volume to The Penguin Classics Book. Bursting with lively descriptions, surprising reading lists, key literary movements and over two thousand cover images, The Penguin Modern Classics Book is an invitation to dive in and explore the greatest literature of the last hundred years.

American Regional Folklore

... Thomas, 1900–1938 Look Homeward, Angel Of Time and the River: A Legend of Man's Hunger in His Youth The Web and the Rock You Can't Go Home Again Wright, Richard, 1908–1960 Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth Native Son Young, ...

American Regional Folklore

An easy-to-use guide to American regional folklore with advice on conducting research, regional essays, and a selective annotated bibliography. * Fully annotated bibliographies on the folklore of each of eight regions of the United States * Engaging overview essays by folklore scholars introduce each of the U.S. regions covered * A list of literary authors who incorporate folklore themes in their writings, together with a brief list of some of their major works * A list of folklore-related museums, with addresses and phone numbers, a list of folklore journals, and, when possible, a list of websites

John Joseph Mathews

Muskogee Times-Democrat, June 30, 1923; Muskogee County Schools, Central High School Class of 1920, 1925 update, ... June 3, 1952; June 5, 1957 (JJM 2.4, 2.10); Thomas Wolfe, Of Time and the River: A Legend of Man's Hunger in His Youth, ...

John Joseph Mathews

John Joseph Mathews (1894–1979) is one of Oklahoma’s most revered twentieth-century authors. An Osage Indian, he was also one of the first Indigenous authors to gain national renown. Yet fame did not come easily to Mathews, and his personality was full of contradictions. In this captivating biography, Michael Snyder provides the first book-length account of this fascinating figure. Known as “Jo” to all his friends, Mathews had a multifaceted identity. A novelist, naturalist, biographer, historian, and tribal preservationist, he was a true “man of letters.” Snyder draws on a wealth of sources, many of them previously untapped, to narrate Mathews’s story. Much of the writer’s family life—especially his two marriages and his relationships with his two children and two stepchildren—is explored here for the first time. Born in the town of Pawhuska in Indian Territory, Mathews attended the University of Oklahoma before venturing abroad and earning a second degree from Oxford. He served as a flight instructor during World War I, traveled across Europe and northern Africa, and bought and sold land in California. A proud Osage who devoted himself to preserving Osage culture, Mathews also served as tribal councilman and cultural historian for the Osage Nation. Like many gifted artists, Mathews was not without flaws. And perhaps in the eyes of some critics, he occupies a nebulous space in literary history. Through insightful analysis of his major works, especially his semiautobiographical novel Sundown and his meditative Talking to the Moon, Snyder revises this impression. The story he tells, of one remarkable individual, is also the story of the Osage Nation, the state of Oklahoma, and Native America in the twentieth century.

Backgazing Reverse Time in Modernist Culture

Look Homeward, Angel: A Story of the Buried Life. New York: Scribner's, 1929. Wolfe, Thomas. Of Time and the River: A Legend of Mans Hunger in His Youth. 1935. Repr. London: Penguin, 1971. Wolfe, Thomas. You Can't Go Home Again.

Backgazing  Reverse Time in Modernist Culture

This volume trace ways in which time is represented in reverse forms throughout modernist culture, from the beginning of the twentieth century until the decade after World War II. Though modernism is often associated with revolutionary or futurist directions, this book argues instead that a retrograde dimension is embedded within it. By juxtaposing the literature of Europe and North America with that of Australia and New Zealand, it suggests how this antipodean context serves to defamiliarize and reconceptualize normative modernist understandings of temporal progression. Backgazing thus moves beyond the treatment of a specific geographical periphery as another margin on the expanding field of 'New Modernist Studies'. Instead, it offers a systematic investigation of the transformative effect of retrograde dimensions on our understanding of canonical modernist texts. The title, 'backgazing', is taken from Australian poet Robert G. FitzGerald's 1938 poem 'Essay on Memory', and it epitomizes how the cultural history of modernism can be restructured according to a radically different discursive map. Backgazing intellectually reconfigures US and European modernism within a planetary orbit in which the literature of Australia and the Southern Hemisphere, far from being merely an annexed margin, can be seen substantively to change the directional compass of modernism more generally. By reading canonical modernists such as James Joyce and T. S. Eliot alongside marginalized writers such as Nancy Cunard and others and relatively neglected authors from Australia and New Zealand, this book offers a revisionist cultural history of modernist time, one framed by a recognition of how its measurement is modulated across geographical space.

A Study Guide for Thomas Wolfe s Far and Near

Wolfe's Of Time and the River: A Legend of Man's Hunger in His Youth (1935) continues the story of Eugene Gant, following him into adulthood and throughout Europe. Like its predecessor, the book was highly autobiographical and drew ...

A Study Guide for Thomas Wolfe s  Far and Near


Impressively Free

Nouwen's “reverse mission” began with a ten-week speaking tour across North America talking about his experiences in Latin ... in Of Time and the River: A Legend of Man's Hunger in His Youth, Wolfe's sequel to Look Homeward Angel, ...

Impressively Free

Explores the genesis and evolution of Nouwen’s multi-layered understanding of priestly ministry.

Speaking from the Heart

Julien Green , God's Fool : The Life and Times of Francis of Assisi , trans . ... Thomas Wolfe , Of Time and the River : A Legend of Man's Hunger in His Youth ( New York : Charles Scribner and Sons , 1935 ) , 22 . 12.

Speaking from the Heart


The New York Public Library Literature Companion

Of Time and the River: A Legend of Man's Hunger in His Youth (1935). A novel by THOMAS WOLFE, the sequel to LOOK HOMEWARD, ANGEL (1929), depicting further events in the life of Eugene GANT as he attends Harvard, suffers the death of his ...

The New York Public Library Literature Companion

Pick up The New York Public Library Literature Companion to check the dates of Marcel Proust's Remembrance of Things Past or to find out how James Joyce's Ulysses changed U.S. obscenity laws, and you may find yourself hours later absorbed in the imaginary worlds of Camelot and The Matrix or sidetracked by the fascinating history of The New Yorker. Designed to satisfy the curious browser as well as the serious researcher, this exciting new resource offers the most up-to-date information on literature available in English from around the world, from the invention of writing to the age of the computer. Interwoven throughout the more than 2,500 succinct and insightful entries on Creators, Works of Literature, and Literary Facts and Resources are the fascinating facts and quirky biographical details that make literature come alive. Readers will discover, for instance, that Walt Whitman was fired from his government job after his personal copy of Leaves of Grass was discovered in his desk by the Secretary of the Interior, who was scandalized by it; that James Baldwin remembered listening to blues singer Bessie Smith ("playing her till I fell asleep") when he was writing his first book; and that a publisher turned down the serialization rights to Gone with the Wind, saying, "Who needs the Civil War now -- who cares?" Looking for information about book burning or how many Nobel laureates have come from Japan? You'll find it here. Trying to remember the name of that movie based on a favorite book? Read the "Variations" section -- you'll be amazed at the pervasive presence of great literature in today's entertainment. From Aristophanes to Allende, from Bergson to Bloom, the biographical entries will inform readers about the men and women who have shaped -- and are shaping -- the literary world. Look into "Works of Literature" to discover the significance of Beowulf, The Fountainhead, Doctor Zhivago, and nearly 1,000 other titles. Check the "Dictionary of Literature" to find out what the critics and theorists are talking about. And if you wish to delve even deeper, "Websites for Literature" and "Literary Factbooks and Handbooks" are just two of the bibliographies that will point readers in the right direction. Unique in scope and design and easy to use, The New York Public Library Literature Companion will be at home on every reader's shelf. Whether you are immersed in Stephen King or King Lear, this book has the insights, facts, and fascinating stories that will enrich your reading forever. With four major research centers and 85 branch libraries, The New York Public Library is internationally recognized as one of the greatest institutions of its kind. Founded in 1895, the library now holds more than 50 million items, including several world-renowned collections of literary manuscripts and rare books. Among the books published from the library in recent years are The New York Public Library Desk Reference (1998); The Hand of the Poet (1997); Letters of Transit: Reflections on Exile, Identity, Language, and Loss (1999); A Secret Location on the Lower East Side: Adventures in Writing, 1960-1980 (1998); and Utopia: The Search for the Ideal Society in the Western World (2000).