Of Walking In Ice

This edition of the book is being published for the first time as a classic piece of proto-psychogeography, to coincide with the fortieth anniversary of the legendary director’s walk.

Of Walking In Ice

A poetic meditation on life and death, by one of the most renowned and respected film-makers and intellectuals of our time. In November 1974, when Werner Herzog was told that his mentor Lotte Eisner, the film-maker and critic, was dying in Paris, he set off to walk there from Munich, ‘in full faith, believing that she would stay alive if I came on foot’. Along the way he recorded what he saw, how he felt, and what he experienced, from the physical discomfort of the journey to moments of rapture. It is a remarkable narrative – part pilgrimage, part meditation, and a confrontation between a great German Romantic imagination and the contemporary world. This edition of the book is being published for the first time as a classic piece of proto-psychogeography, to coincide with the fortieth anniversary of the legendary director’s walk.

Of walking in ice

Of walking in ice


Of Walking in Ice

Of Walking in Ice


The Films of Werner Herzog

However, his diary Vom Gehen im Eis (Of Walking in Ice), available in English since 1980, as well as his published articles in German, have gone largely unnoticed. As described in Of Walking in Ice, the very act of walking from Munich ...

The Films of Werner Herzog

Given Herzog’s own pronouncement that ‘film is not the art of scholars, but of illiterates,’ it is not surprising that his work has aroused ambivalent and contradictory responses. Visually and philosophically ambitious and at the same time provocatively eccentric, Herzog’s films have been greeted equally by extreme adulation and extreme condemnation. Even as Herzog’s rebellious images have gained him a reputation as a master of the German New Wave, he has been attacked for indulging in a romantic naiveté and wilful self-absorption. To his hardest critics, Herzog’s films appear as little more than Hollywood fantasies disguised as high seriousness. This book is an attempt to illuminate these contradictions. It gathers essays that focus from a variety of angles on Herzog and his work. The contributors move beyond the myths of Herzog to investigate the merits of his work and its place in film history. A challenging range of films is covered, from Fata Morgana and Aguirre, the Wrath of God to more recent features such as Nosferatu and Where the Green Ants Dream, offering the reader ways of understanding why, whatever the controversies surrounding Herzog and his films, he remains a major and popular international filmmaker. Orignally published in 1986.

Walking on Ice

... opinions of the author and do not represent the opinions or thoughts of the publisher. The author represents and warrants that s/he either owns or has the legal right to publish all material in this book. Walking On Ice An American ...

Walking on Ice

Doing Business in Russia is like doing business anywhere else--but different. Walking on Ice is MANDATORY reading for all who contemplate a tour of duty whether government or business in Russia or who have worked there... it brings back memories and reality...one cannot put it down. With insight, understanding, and a rare degree of humor, Fred Andresen tells us about working with the Russians. Richard Weden, General Director, American Express Russia. 1995 to 2004 What Andresen has written is romantic and accurate and nostalgic and prophetic and all of the wonderful and confusing and simple things we ?Çÿveterans know Russia to be. It is a story that resonates with any of us living through this dramatic and productive era. Kevin Cuffe, Vice President/Managing Director, SOVINTEL / Golden Telecom, Moscow Walking on Ice is of real interest to the casual reader as well of great value to those looking to make their own mark in the world of Russian business. The book gives valuable insights from one of the real pioneers. Peter Charow, Founder and first president of the American Chamber of Commerce in Russia, presently British Petroleum Regional Director for Russia, CIS and Turkey. Andresen conveys the texture and flavor of what we Westerners find in Russia. It paints a picture of the Russian ?ÇÿSoul at a time when young and old were and are adapting to enormous change. It is a fun and humorous read that carries with it some valuable lessons. I recommend it to anyone interested in understanding todays Russia. William T. Potvin, Managing Partner, Deloitte & Touche, Russia, 1990 - 1996

Writing on Air

From. Of. Walking. in. Ice. Werner. Herzog. In 1974, at the age of thirty-two, Werner Herzog, one ofthe most renowned German directors ofthe twentieth century, set out on a walk across Europe to visit his friend Lotte Eisner, ...

Writing on Air

Writers, photographers, and artists explore air in our everyday and imaginative lives.

Georg B chner Neue Perspektiven zur internationalen Rezeption

Herzog's archeology of German cultural history traces formal and stylistic emphases that he shares with Murnau ... Published in English : Of Walking in Ice : MunichParis , 11/23 to 12/14 , 1974 , translated from the German by Martje ...

Georg B  chner  Neue Perspektiven zur internationalen Rezeption


The Vintage Book Of Walking

Herzog had written a short prose book, Of Walking in Ice, which illustrated this theory and which Bruce loved. Herzog had brought with him to Seillans a documentary he had made on the Wodaabe nomads of the Niger, 'Herdsmen of the Sun'.

The Vintage Book Of Walking

'It is good to collect things, but better to go on walks. ' Anatole France. A fundamental act, often taken for granted, yet through the centuries it has inspired a fascinating literature. This, the first comprehensive anthology on the subject, delves into why we walk and how we walk; the differences between the country hike and the city stroll; walking and wooing; walking into trouble and marching out. Then some of us will walk to meet the Maker. A mix of fiction and non-fiction, poetry and drama provides the reader with over two hundred booted authors. Xenophone and Baudelaire, Flora Thompson and Julian Barnes, Mark Twain and Roberto Calasso tramp the pages of this fascinating collection.

The Art of Wandering

155 i Werner Herzog, Of Walking in Ice (1978), trans. by Marje HerZog & Alan Greenberg, New York: Free Association, 2007, Foreword Q HerZog, Of Walking in Ice, pp. 42 & 17 [\J [\JNNNl—K ml» wlwl-lolao lwl'” >4 0 OJ '3 l3 B lg l3 l% E ii ...

The Art of Wandering

The Art of Wandering is a history of that curious hybrid, the writer as walker. From the peripatetic philosophers of Ancient Greece to the streets of twenty-first century London, Paris and New York, this figure has evolved through the centuries, the philosopher and the Romantic giving way to the experimentalist and radical. From pilgrim to pedestrian, fl?neur to stalker, the names may change but the activity of walking remains constant, creating a literary tradition encompassing philosophy and poetry, the novel and the manifesto; a tradition which this book explores in detail. Today, as the figure of the wanderer returns to the forefront of the public imagination, writers and walkers from around the world are re-engaging with the ideas which animated earlier generations. For the walker is once again on the march, mapping new territory and recording new visions of the landscape.

A Companion to Werner Herzog

His travel diary Of Walking in Ice —a chronicle of his journey on foot from Munich to Paris in the winter of 1974—is filled with hyperbolic valorizations of solitude. It includes customary Herzogian declarations such as “when I move, ...

A Companion to Werner Herzog

A Companion to Werner Herzog showcases over two dozen original scholarly essays examining nearly five decades of filmmaking by one of the most acclaimed and innovative figures in world cinema. First collection in twenty years dedicated to examining Herzog’s expansive career Features essays by international scholars and Herzog specialists Addresses a broad spectrum of the director’s films, from his earliest works such as Signs of Life and Fata Morgana to such recent films as The Bad Lieutenant and Encounters at the End of the World Offers creative, innovative approaches guided by film history, art history, and philosophy Includes a comprehensive filmography that also features a list of the director’s acting appearances and opera productions Explores the director’s engagement with music and the arts, his self-stylization as a global filmmaker, his Bavarian origins, and even his love-hate relationship with the actor Klaus Kinski

Peripatetic Frame

In a grand gesture worthy of any number of the enigmatic characters who populate his films, Herzog immediately set off on foot from Munich on a ... Herzog kept a journal of his trek, publishing it four years later as Of Walking in Ice.

Peripatetic Frame

From cinema's earliest days, walking and filmmaking have been intrinsically linked. Technologically, culturally and aesthetically, the pioneers of cinema were not only interested in using the camera to scientifically study ambulatory motion, but were also keen to capture the speed and mobile culture of late 19th-century urban life. Photographers such as Felix Nadar took their cameras into the Parisian streets and boulevards as mechanised flneurs, ushering us into the age of the 'mobilised virtual gaze'. But if photography could only embalm modernity in an instant of time, the cinema brought these instants to life again. From Muybridge and Marey's photographic studies of motion to Charlie Chaplin's character 'The Tramp', and from the Steadicam to the police procedural, Thomas Deane Tucker explores the intertwined relationship between cinema and walking from its very first steps - breaking new ground in motion studies and providing a bold new perspective on film history.

The Philosophy of Werner Herzog

CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_003/0000425, co-fi- nanced by the European Regional Development Fund and the state budget of the Czech Republic. 2. The walk to Paris did not become a film, but a book, Of Walking in Ice (1980), in which we find ...

The Philosophy of Werner Herzog

Legendary director, actor, author, and provocateur Werner Herzog has incalculably influenced contemporary cinema for decades. Until now there has been no sustained effort to gather and present a variety of diverse philosophical approaches to his films and to the thinking behind their creation. The Philosophy of Werner Herzog, edited by M. Blake Wilson and Christopher Turner, collects fourteen essays by professional philosophers and film theorists from around the globe, who explore the famed German auteur’s notions of “ecstatic truth” as opposed to “accountants’ truth,” his conception of nature and its penchant for “overwhelming and collective murder,” his controversial film production techniques, his debts to his philosophical and aesthetic forebears, and finally, his pointed objections to his would-be critics––including, among others, the contributors to this book themselves. By probing how Herzog’s thinking behind the camera is revealed in the action he captures in front of it, The Philosophy of Werner Herzog shines new light upon the images and dialog we see and hear on the screen by enriching our appreciation of a prolific––yet enigmatic––film artist.

Mythogeography

Werner Herzog, walking "in ice" to save a life. Apart from serious injury, nothing can go wrong on a dérive; there is no 'meant to happen'. Mistakes can be poetic: Linda Cracknel setting off to walk up an Alp “in her father's footsteps” ...

Mythogeography

This is the gloriously funny and endlessly fascinating account of the author's recent journey on foot across the north of England in the footsteps of a man who made the same journey 100 years ago with a dog trouve called Pontiflunk.

Werner Herzog

GO: Your own book, Of Walking in Ice, strikes me as in effect a poem. WH: Well, we shouldn't get too deep into definitions. It's a prose text but has qualities of poetry, like Lenz by Georg Büchner. Lenz is only thirty pages long, ...

Werner Herzog

Over the course of his career, legendary director Werner Herzog (b. 1942) has made almost sixty films and given more than eight hundred interviews. This collection features the best of these, focusing on all the major films, from Signs of Life and Aguirre, the Wrath of God to Grizzly Man and Cave of Forgotten Dreams. When did Herzog decide to become a filmmaker? Who are his key influences? Where does he find his peculiar themes and characters? What role does music play in his films? How does he see himself in relation to the German past and in relation to film history? And how did he ever survive the wrath of Klaus Kinski? Herzog answers these and many other questions in twenty-five interviews ranging from the 1960s to the present. Critics and fans recognized Herzog’s importance as a young German filmmaker early on, but his films have attained international significance over the decades. Most of the interviews collected in this volume—some of them from Herzog’s production archive and previously unpublished—appear in English for the very first time. Together, they offer an unprecedented look at Herzog’s work, his career, and his public persona as it has developed and changed over time.

Walking on Ice

Walking on Ice When Barry invited her north for the three - day holiday weekend , her first apprehension was that they wouldn't come home again . They would be snowed in , she felt sure . Or the ice on the river would melt in a sudden ...

Walking on Ice

A mother hires a sinister baby-sitter. An Irish innocent embraces the ambiguities of Belfast. A university professor welcomes a houseguest and finds himself a stranger in his own home. Two young women seek romance along the Canadian border .... Winner of the Associated Writing Programs' Award in Short Fiction, Walking on Ice depicts a world in which human relationships grow ever more fragile and trust is tentative at best. In these stories men and women confront the unexpected risks of everday life in Boston, Northern Ireland, Connecticut, the Scottish Highlands, and upstate New York. With subtlety and wit, Susan Hubbard explores the tensions of our times.

Werner Herzog

21) In Of Walking in Ice, his memoir of his three-week walk from Munich to Paris in November 1974, undertaken as a prophylactic charm to ward off the death of the ailing film scholar Lotte Eisner, Herzog produces verbal equivalents that ...

Werner Herzog

Werner Herzog has produced some of the most powerful, haunting, and memorable images ever captured on film. Both his fiction films and his documentaries address fundamental issues about nature, selfhood, and history in ways that engage with but also criticize and qualify the best philosophical thinking about these topics. In focusing on figures from Aguirre, Kasper Hauser, and Stroszek to Timothy Treadwell, Graham Dorrington, Dieter Dengler, and Walter Steiner, among many others, Herzog investigates the nature of human life in time and the possibilities of meaning that might be available within it. His films demonstrate the importance of the image in coming to terms with the plights of contemporary industrial and commercial culture. Eldridge unpacks and develops Herzog's achievement by bringing his work into engagement with the thinking of Freud, Merleau-Ponty, Nietzsche, Hegel, Cavell, and Benjamin, but more importantly also by attending closely to the logic and development of the films themselves and to Herzog's own extensive writings about filmmaking.

Werner Herzog

München – Paris 23.11 bis 14.12 1974 (Of Walking in Ice, 1978), it becomes clear that Herzog also sees in the nomadic principle the possibility of a community in which everyone holds their thinking open and thinks consistently in terms ...

Werner Herzog

Werner Herzog came to fame in the 1970s as the European new wave explored new cinematic ideas. With films like Signs of Life (1968); Aguirre, the Wrath of God (1972); The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser (1974); and Fitzcarraldo (1982), Herzog became the subject of public debate, particularly due to his larger than life characters, often played by the wild Klaus Kinski. After the success of his documentary Grizzly Man (2005), Herzog became a leading force in a new form of hybrid documentary, and his tough attitude toward life and film made him a director’s director for a new generation of aspiring filmmakers. Kristoffer Hegnsvad’s award-winning book guides the reader through films depicting gangster priests, bear whisperers, shoe eating, revolutionary filmmakers . . . and a penguin. It is full of rare insights from Herzog’s otherwise secretive Rogue Film School, and features interviews with Herzog.