On Free Choice of the Will

"Translated with an uncanny sense for the overall point of Augustine's doctrine. In short, a very good translation. The Introduction is admirably clear." --Paul Vincent Spade, Indiana University

On Free Choice of the Will

"Translated with an uncanny sense for the overall point of Augustine's doctrine. In short, a very good translation. The Introduction is admirably clear." --Paul Vincent Spade, Indiana University

Augustine On the Free Choice of the Will On Grace and Free Choice and Other Writings

This volume is the first to bring together Augustine's early and later writings on these two themes, in a new translation by Peter King, enabling the reader to see what Augustine regarded as the crowning achievement of his work.

Augustine  On the Free Choice of the Will  On Grace and Free Choice  and Other Writings

The works translated here deal with two major themes in the thinking of St Augustine (354-430): free will and divine grace. On the one hand, free will enables human beings to make their own choices; on the other hand, God's grace is required for these choices to be efficacious. 'On the Free Choice of the Will', 'On Grace and Free Choice', 'On Reprimand and Grace' and 'On the Gift of Perseverance' set out Augustine's theory of human responsibility, and sketch a subtle reconciliation of will and grace. This volume is the first to bring together Augustine's early and later writings on these two themes, in a new translation by Peter King, enabling the reader to see what Augustine regarded as the crowning achievement of his work. The volume also includes a clear and accessible introduction that analyzes Augustine's key philosophical lines of thought.

The Teacher The Free Choice of the Will Grace and Free Will The Fathers of the Church Volume 59

If, indeed, man is something good and cannot do what is right unless he wills to, then he must have free will, ... Besides, if man were without free choice of the will, what would become of the good called justice whereby sins are ...

The Teacher  The Free Choice of the Will  Grace and Free Will  The Fathers of the Church  Volume 59

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Augustine On the Free Choice of the Will On Grace and Free Choice and Other Writings

the Will 1.12.25.82. although god alone is completely free, angels and human beings have free will. ... of the will in three theses. first, he holds that we are responsible only for acts done out of free choice. as early as On the Free ...

Augustine  On the Free Choice of the Will  On Grace and Free Choice  and Other Writings

The main objective of Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy is to expand the range, variety, and quality of texts in the history of philosophy which are available in English. The series includes texts by familiar names (such as Descartes and Kant) and also by less well-known authors. Wherever possible, texts are published in complete and unabridged form, and translations are specially commissioned for the series. Each volume contains a critical introduction together with a guide to further reading and any necessary glossaries and textual apparatus. The volumes are designed for student use at undergraduate and postgraduate level, and will be of interest not only to students of philosophy but also to a wider audience of readers in the history of science, the history of theology, and the history of ideas. The works translated here deal with two major themes in the thinking of St. Augustine (354-430): free will and divine grace. On the one hand, free will enables human beings to make their own choices; on the other hand, God's grace is required for these choices to be efficacious. On the Free Choice of the Will, On Grace and Free Choice, On Reprimand and Grace, and On the Gift of Perseverance set out Augustine's theory of human responsibility, and sketch a subtle reconciliation of will and grace. This volume is the first to bring together Augustine's early and later writings on these two themes, in a new translation by Peter King, enabling the reader to see what Augustine regarded as the crowning achievement of his work. The volume also includes a clear and accessible introduction that analyzes Augustine's key philosophical lines of thought. Karl Ameriks is Professor Philosophy at the University of Notre Dame Desmond M. Clarke is Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at University College Cork

Augustine On the Free Choice of the Will On Grace and Free Choice and Other Writings

the Will 1.12.25.82. although god alone is completely free, angels and human beings have free will. Just as our minds can transcend the mere sensible world and rise to the contemplation of eternal truths, so too our wills can transcend ...

Augustine  On the Free Choice of the Will  On Grace and Free Choice  and Other Writings

The works translated here deal with two major themes in the thinking of St Augustine (354–430): free will and divine grace. On the one hand, free will enables human beings to make their own choices; on the other hand, God's grace is required for these choices to be efficacious. 'On the Free Choice of the Will', 'On Grace and Free Choice', 'On Reprimand and Grace' and 'On the Gift of Perseverance' set out Augustine's theory of human responsibility, and sketch a subtle reconciliation of will and grace. This volume is the first to bring together Augustine's early and later writings on these two themes, in a new translation by Peter King, enabling the reader to see what Augustine regarded as the crowning achievement of his work. The volume also includes a clear and accessible introduction that analyzes Augustine's key philosophical lines of thought.

On the Free Choice of the Will On Grace and Free Choice and Other Writings

This volume is the first to bring together Augustine's early and later writings on these two themes, in a new translation by Peter King, enabling the reader to see what Augustine regarded as the crowning achievement of his work.

On the Free Choice of the Will  On Grace and Free Choice  and Other Writings

"The works translated here deal with two major themes in the thinking of St Augustine (354-430): free will and divine grace. On the one hand, free will enables human beings to make their own choices; on the other hand, God's grace is required for these choices to be efficacious. 'On the Free Choice of the Will', 'On Grace and Free Choice', 'On Reprimand and Grace' and 'On the Gift of Perseverance' set out Augustine's theory of human responsibility, and sketch a subtle reconciliation of will and grace. This volume is the first to bring together Augustine's early and later writings on these two themes, in a new translation by Peter King, enabling the reader to see what Augustine regarded as the crowning achievement of his work. The volume also includes a clear and accessible introduction that analyzes Augustine's key philosophical lines of thought"--Provided by publisher.

Augustine s Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to Non free Free Will

No evidence of a conversion from traditional free choice to Divine Unilateral Predetermination of Individuals's Eternal Destinies – or any of his ... Augustine then accuses his former fellow Manichaeans of abusing the term 'free will.

Augustine s Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to  Non free Free Will

The consensus view asserts Augustine developed his later doctrines ca. 396 CE while writing Ad Simplicianum as a result of studying scripture. His early De libero arbitrio argued for traditional free choice refuting Manichaean determinism, but his anti-Pelagian writings rejected any human ability to believe without God giving faith. Kenneth M. Wilson's study is the first work applying the comprehensive methodology of reading systematically and chronologically through Augustine's entire extant corpus (works, sermons, and letters 386-430 CE), and examining his doctrinal development. The author explores Augustine's later theology within the prior philosophical-religious context of free choice versus deterministic arguments. This analysis demonstrates Augustine persisted in traditional views until 412 CE and his theological transition was primarily due to his prior Stoic, Neoplatonic, and Manichaean influences.

Joseph Albo on Free Choice

He also knows before anything happens that it will happen. Furthermore, He is cognizant of what one's choice will be before one makes it.4 Saadia explains that since God's knowledge is not causative, human will is free.

Joseph Albo on Free Choice

Joseph Albo on Free Choice discovers unsuspected philosophical originality in the interpretations of biblical narrative found in Joseph Albo's Book of Principles, one of the most popular Hebrew works in the corpus of medieval Jewish philosophy. Several of Albo's exegetical analyses focus onfree choice, which emerges as a conceptual scheme throughout his work. An exploration of Albo's innovative homiletical interpretations of the binding of Isaac, the hardening of Pharaoh's heart, the Book of Job, and God's choice of Israel, reveals his view of free choice which was significant duringa historical period of religious coercion. Albo's sole surviving responsum dealing with the case of the qatlanit further demonstrates his philosophical position. In this new book, Shira Weiss shows that in the medieval era in which Albo lived, free choice was an important topic, subject to vehementdebate that has continued to be contested in modern philosophy.

Augustinus Lexikon

"The Augustinus-Lexikon is both a conceptual and a real dictionary. In alphabetical order, it covers concepts, people and things that are of importance for the life, work and teachings of Augustine."--

Augustinus Lexikon


Radix Naturalis

Augustine presents his doctrine of the will as an intermediate good in God's well-ordered hierarchy of goods, ... Augustine, On Free Choice of the Will, 59, 58. essential truth of Christianity: If we can save ourselves, why Pelagianism, ...

Radix Naturalis

The substance of this present work is liberation semiology. The world's own principle is love (agape). Our fellow creatures are co-symbols of emancipation from human violence. Creation is not, as influential modern thinkers envision, mere material, mere nature, to commodify and dominate for the freedom of an exclusive constituency of our species. The ecological crisis emerges from a tragic misfit between experiments with secular sovereignty and the continuance of Christian historicity. Either the Christian form of life (of time) is replaced, revealing a new ecological worldview, or we revive Christian sovereignty as a creative fit with the actuality of Christian historicity. This work wagers on the latter: Christian civilization is coextensive with ecological civilization.

Descartes and Augustine

Certainly the will [ voluntas ) , conceived as the power of willing , belongs to the nature of the human soul ... But I ask whether this free choice [ liberum arbitrium ] , by which we are shown to have the power of sinning ( facultas ...

Descartes and Augustine

This book is a systematic study of Descartes' relation to Augustine. It offers a complete reevaluation of Descartes' thought and as such will be of major importance to all historians of medieval, neo-Platonic, or early modern philosophy. Stephen Menn demonstrates that Descartes uses Augustine's central ideas as a point of departure for a critique of medieval Aristotelian physics, which he replaces with a new, mechanistic anti-Aristotelian physics. Special features of the book include a reading of the Meditations, a comprehensive historical and philosophical introduction to Augustine's thought, a detailed account of Plotinus, and a contextualization of Descartes' mature philosophical project which explores both the framework within which it evolved and the early writings, to show how the collapse of the early project drove Descartes to the writings of Augustine.

The Will and Human Action

Cf.On Free Choice of the Will, 3.10.29. 41 On Free Choice of the Will, 3.9.28. 42 Cf. On FreeChoice of theWill, 3.15.42–16.46. 43 Cf. OnFree Choice ofthe Will,2.8; 3.69; M. Baltesand D. Lau, 'Animal', in AugustinusLexikon, 1988,pp.

The Will and Human Action

What is the will? And what is its relation to human action? Throughout history, philosophers have been fascinated by the idea of 'the will': the source of the drive that motivates human beings to act. However, there has never been a clear consensus as to what the will is and how it relates to human action. Some philosophers have taken the will to be based firmly in reason and rational choice, and some have seen it as purely self-determined. Others have replaced the idea of the human will with a more general drive uniting humans and the rest of nature, living and non-living. This collection of nine specially commissioned papers trace the formulation and treatment of the problem of the will from ancient philosophy through the scholastic theologians of the Middle Ages, to modern philosophy, and right up to contemporary theories. Philosophers discussed include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Bonaventure, Hobbes, Kant, Schopenhauer and Nietzsche.

Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans

Onfree choice “Therefore, both sin and the thing rightly done exist in the free choice of the will.”222 But Boethius, diligently explaining what free choice is, says in the third book of the second edition of On Interpretation, ...

Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans

Despite its importance and the frequent references made to it by modern scholars, this commentary has never before been translated into English in its entirety. This volume, which includes an extensive introduction, fills this gap, thus providing a needed contribution to medieval scholarship.

Four Views on Free Will

To simplify, suppose that it is character alone and not motives in addition that explains the effort of will. Imagine first that the character that explains the effort is not a product of the agent's free choices, but, rather, ...

Four Views on Free Will

Focusing on the concepts and interactions of free will, moralresponsibility, and determinism, this text represents the mostup-to-date account of the four major positions in the free willdebate. Four serious and well-known philosophers explore the opposingviewpoints of libertarianism, compatibilism, hard incompatibilism,and revisionism The first half of the book contains each philosopher’sexplanation of his particular view; the second half allows them todirectly respond to each other’s arguments, in a lively andengaging conversation Offers the reader a one of a kind, interactive discussion Forms part of the acclaimed Great Debates in Philosophyseries

Twelve Great Philosophers

But free choice is fundamentally " an appetitive power . 1975 The same power of the rational soul wills and elects . “ And on this account will and the free choice are not two powers , but one . ” Actions compelled by external force are ...

Twelve Great Philosophers

A collection on the historical introduction to human nature.

Saint Augustine

Saint Augustine


Bernard of Clairvaux

Creating grace made the will; saving grace enables the will to will the good, so that the will has no merit in ... or permissible things will be found pleasing by the will thus altered by grace.98 Free choice ought to try to govern its ...

Bernard of Clairvaux

In this book the renowned medievalist G.R. Evans provides a concise introduction to St. Bernard of Clairvaux (1090-1153), a figure of towering importance on the twelfth-century monastic and theological scene. After a brief overview of Bernard's life, Evans focuses on a few major themes in his work, including his theology of spirituality and his theology of the political life of the Church. The only available introduction to Bernard's life and thought, this latest addition to the Great Medieval Thinkers series will appeal to a wide audience of students and scholars of history and theology.

Patristic Tradition and Intellectual Paradigms in the 17th Century

Free choice of the will, as he explains it here, is an intermediate good, not, like justice, an unqualified good. When we use our free will to act rightly, then the result is something good. In fact, it is something that could not have ...

Patristic Tradition and Intellectual Paradigms in the 17th Century

Contributions to a conference held in Zurich in 2006.

The Works of Saint Augustine v 1 The Confessions

Freedom of choice , then , is the capability of committing or of avoiding sin , immune from compelling necessity ; it has in its own power which path it will follow of the two that suggest themselves , that is , either the arduous and ...

The Works of Saint Augustine  v  1  The Confessions


Hearings

Will free choice television bring an end to established commercial broadcast . ing ? Certainly not . As long as there are products to seil , there will be advertisers who will want to use this excellent medium to sell them .

Hearings