On the Backs of Tortoises

This book tells the story of the islands’ namesakes—the giant tortoises—as coveted food sources, objects of natural history, and famous icons of conservation and tourism.

On the Backs of Tortoises

An insightful exploration of the iconic Galápagos tortoises, and how their fate is inextricably linked to our own in a rapidly changing world The Galápagos archipelago is often viewed as a last foothold of pristine nature. For sixty years, conservationists have worked to restore this evolutionary Eden after centuries of exploitation at the hands of pirates, whalers, and island settlers. This book tells the story of the islands’ namesakes—the giant tortoises—as coveted food sources, objects of natural history, and famous icons of conservation and tourism. By doing so, it brings into stark relief the paradoxical, and impossible, goal of conserving species by trying to restore a past state of prehistoric evolution. The tortoises, Elizabeth Hennessy demonstrates, are not prehistoric, but rather microcosms whose stories show how deeply human and nonhuman life are entangled. In a world where evolution is thoroughly shaped by global history, Hennessy puts forward a vision for conservation based on reckoning with the past, rather than trying to erase it.

The Galapagos

In this captivating natural history, Henry Nicholls builds up the ecology of these famous islands, from their explosive origins to the arrival of the archipelago's celebrated reptiles and ultimately humans.

The Galapagos

Formed of dramatic volcanic scenery and home to marvellous beasts, it is little wonder that the first name for the Galpagos archipelago was Las Encantadas: the enchanted islands. In this captivating natural history, Henry Nicholls builds up the ecology of these famous islands, from their explosive origins to the arrival of the archipelago's celebrated reptiles and ultimately humans. It's a story of change, as the islands are transformed from lava-strewn wilderness into a vital scientific resource and a sought-after destination for eco-enthusiasts. Charles Darwin's five-week visit to the Galpagos in 1835 played a pivotal role in this transformation. At the time, he was more interested in rocks than finches, took the opportunity to ride on the backs of tortoises and fling iguanas into the sea. Yet the Galpagos experience can be an inspiration and it certainly was for Darwin, pointing him towards one of the most important and influential ideas in the history of humankind: evolution by natural selection. And with the Darwin connection, the Galpagos found itself propelled onto a global stage. But worldwide fame has brought with it nearly 200,000 tourists a year and a human population now estimated at around 30,000. If Darwin learned from the Galpagos, so we must too. For what happens here in years to come foreshadows the fate of threatened ecosystems everywhere on earth.

The Young Tradesman Or Book of English Trades Being a Library of the Useful Arts for Commercial Education With Seventy Engravings A New Edition Enlarged Etc

In some places and ages they have even written on the skins of fishes ; on the
intestines of serpents , and in others , on the backs of tortoises . There are few
plants but nave , at some time , been used for paper or pooks , and hence the
several ...

The Young Tradesman  Or  Book of English Trades  Being a Library of the Useful Arts  for Commercial Education  With Seventy Engravings  A New Edition  Enlarged  Etc


a taist inscription of the yuan dynasty

These stelae , many of them ornamented with dragons and mounted on the
backs of tortoises , have been set up over a period of six hundred years to record
the construction and repairs of the temple and the efficacy of its deities . The
oldest ...

a taist inscription of the yuan dynasty


Galapagos at the Crossroads

The wild goats had also demolished other foods the tortoise depends on:
succulent cactuses, leaves, vines, fruit, ferns, and bromeliads. Once these too
were gone, the goats stepped onto the backs of tortoises, using them as
footstools to reach ...

Galapagos at the Crossroads

As eloquent as it is alarming, Carol Ann Bassett’s portrait of today’s Galápagos depicts a deadly collision of economics, politics, and the environment that may destroy one of the world’s last Edens. For millions, the Galápagos Islands represent nature at its most unspoiled, an inviolate place famed for its rare flora and fauna. But soon today’s 30,000 human residents could surpass 50,000. Add invasive species, floods of tourists, and unresolved conflicts between Ecuadorian laws and local concerns, and it’s easy to see why the Galápagos were recently added to UNESCO’s World Heritage in Danger list. Each chapter in this provocative, perceptive book focuses on a specific person or group with a stake in the Galápagos’ natural resources—from tour companies whose activities are often illegal and not always green, to creationist guides who lead tours with no mention of evolution, from fishermen up in arms over lobster quotas, to modern-day pirates who poach endangered marine species. Bassett presents a perspective as readable as it is sensible. Told with wit, passion, and grace, the Galápagos story serves as a miniature model of Earth itself, a perfect example of how an environment can be destroyed-- and what is being done to preserve these islands before it's too late.

Tortoise

Hiding from predators, the pancake tortoise is one of the less visible creatures of
East Africa. used as stepping-stones. It was claimed that on Galapagos they were
so numerous that it was possible to walk quite long distances on their backs ...

Tortoise

Tortoise is the first cultural history of these long-lived and intriguing creatures, which have existed for more than 200 million years. The book covers tortoises worldwide, in evolution, myth and reality, ranging across paleontology, natural history, myth, folklore, art forms, literature, veterinary medicine and trade regulations. The tortoise has been seen as an Atlas-like creature supporting the world, as the origin of music and as a philosophical paradox. Peter Young examines the tortoise in all these guises, as well as a military tactical formation, its exploitation by mariners and others for food, as ornament (in tortoiseshell), as a motif in art, and in space research. He looks at the movement away from exploitation to conservation and even the uses of the tortoise in advertising. As well as examples of species, illustrations from around the world include monuments, sculptures, coins, stamps, objets d’art, drawings, cartoons, advertisements and X-rays. The book will appeal not only to tortoise lovers but also to readers of cultural histories around the world. "Peter Young’s Tortoise, on the other claw, can be warmly recommended."—Jonathan Bate, The Times

Reptiles and Amphibians

Family TESTUDINIDAE Species Kinixys erosa Status Unknown SERRATED
HINGE-BACK TORTOISE This is the largest of the hinge-back tortoises and also
the most unusual. All hinge-backs can pivot the rear of carapace appears eroded
or ...

Reptiles and Amphibians

A new edition of the clearest, most authoritative guide to reptiles and amphibians you will find From the Tomato Frog to the Cornsnake, discover over 400 species of reptiles and amphibians from around the world. 600 incredible photos, annotations and detailed descriptions highlighting chief characteristics and distinguishing marks will help you to identify different species quickly and easily. Covers everything from anatomy and lifecycle to behaviour and includes maps showing you the geographical distribution of each species. Perfect for nature lovers.

The Turtle Moves

Why, yes—the idea that the world is supported on the backs of four gigantic
elephants is from hindu mythology. earthquakes ... when the elephants shift their
weight. another hindu myth says that the world rests on the back of a gigantic
tortoise.

The Turtle Moves

After growing from humble beginnings as a Sword & Sorcery parody to more than 30 volumes of wit, wisdom, and whimsy, the Discworld series has become a phenomenon unlike any other. Now, in The Turtle Moves!, Lawrence Watt-Evans presents a story-by-story history of Discworld’s evolution as well as essays on Pratchett’s place in literary canon, the nature of the Disc itself, and the causes and results of the Discworld phenomenon, all refreshingly free of literary jargon littered with informative footnotes. Part breezy reference guide, part droll commentary, The Turtle Moves! will enlighten and entertain every Pratchett reader, from the casual browser to the most devout of Discworld’s fans.

Essentials of Tortoise Medicine and Surgery

The Hinge-backs (Kinixys species) have a caudalcarapacial hinge (see Figure
40.4). ○ Testudo species (except for Testudo horsfieldi, Horsfield's tortoise),
have some plastron mobility between the abdominal and femoral scutes (see
Figure ...

Essentials of Tortoise Medicine and Surgery

Reach for this book whenever a sick or injured tortoise comes into the surgery. Essentials of Tortoise Medicine and Surgery is designed as a concise and practical quick reference for the busy practitioner seeing chelonians as part of their caseload. Covering everything from species identification to common basic surgery for tortoises and freshwater turtles, the emphasis is on the more common and likely diagnoses. The first section of the book gives an overview of the basics of tortoise and semi-aquatic/ aquatic freshwater turtle husbandry and keeping, as well as a guide to general investigation and diagnostic techniques open to clinicians. The second section provides a clinical guide based on clinical signs and differential diagnoses. Based upon the experience of authors who have been practicing with these species for several decades, this book is a useful guide to veterinarians, students, veterinary nurses and technicians new to working with these fascinating creatures. It will also serve as a useful aide memoire to more experienced clinicians.

Famous Tortoises

The young tortoises, as soon as they are hatched fall a prey in great numbers to
the carrion-feeding buzzard. ... I frequently got on their backs, and then giving a
few raps on the hinder part of their shells, they would rise up and walk away; - but
I ...

Famous Tortoises


Moonlight Water

It was bumpy and slow, like driving on the backs of giant tortoises. Two minutes
later they were negotiating through soft sand, and Red was sure they'd get stuck.
“We might have to let some air out of the tires,” said Zahnie. But she kept going.

Moonlight Water

A rock star finds adventure, love, music, healing, and life in Win Blevins and Meredith Blevins' Moonlight Water. Robbie, a San Francisco area musician, half burned out on his career, is blind-sided by his wife's miscarriage and a painful divorce. Devastated, he has a visionary experience which tantalizes him with the possibility of an entirely new life. He sets out to wander America by car to find what his money couldn't buy. Robbie stumbles upon his new life in an unlikely place, among the Navajos. There, he falls in love with a ranger and helps her track down looters that are threatening area artifacts, becomes welcomed into the community, and finds the most valuable artifact of all...himself. Moonlight Water is the story of the redemption of a shipwrecked life through challenge, courage, and love. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

Strangers in the South Seas

Sketch Second: Two Sides to a Tortoise In view of the description given, may one
be gay upon the Encentadas? ... Moreover, everyone knows that tortoises as well
as turtle are of such a make, that if you but put them on their backs you thereby ...

Strangers in the South Seas

Long before Magellan entered the Pacific in 1521 Westerners entertained ideas of undiscovered oceans, mighty continents, and paradisal islands at the far ends of the earth-such ideas would have a long life and a deep impact in both the Pacific and the West. With the discovery of Tahiti in 1767 another powerful myth was added to this collection: the noble savage. For the first time Westerners were confronted by a people who seemed happier than themselves. This revolution in the human sciences was accompanied by one in the natural sciences after Darwin's momentous visit to the Galapagos Islands. The Pacific produced other challenges for nineteenth-century researchers on race and culture, and for those intent on exporting their religions to this immense quarter of the globe. As the century wore on, the region presented opportunities and dilemmas for the imperial powers, a process was accelerated by the Pacific War between 1941 and 1945. Strangers in the South Seas recounts and illustrates this story using a wealth of primary texts. It includes generous excerpts from the work of explorers, soldiers, naturalists, anthropologists, artists, and writers--some famous, some obscure. It shows how "the Great South Sea" has been an irreplaceable "distant mirror" of the West and its intellectual obsessions since the Renaissance.

Billy Budd and Other Stories

Moreover, every one knows that tortoises as well as turtles are of such a make,
that if you but put them on their backs you ... But after you have done this, and
because you have done this, you should not swear that the tortoise has no dark
side.

Billy Budd and Other Stories

Brilliant short stories and a novella by the author of Moby-Dick "Billy Budd, Sailor," a classic confrontation between good and evil, is the story of an innocent young man unable to defend himself from wrongful accusations. Other selections include "Bartleby," "The Piazza," "The Encantadas," "The Bell-Tower," "Benito Cereno," "The Paradise of Bachelors," and "The Tartarus of Maids." For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Penny Magazine of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge

The turtle and the tortoise belong to the same group of reptiles — in fact the turtle
is a tortoise which principally inhabits ... tortoise, whether of the land or water
species, is, as most of our readers know, protected, both on the back and belly,
by a ...

The Penny Magazine of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge


The Book of Shells

They also at times fix themselves on the shells of the larger Mollusca , and on the
backs of whales , tortoises , & c . These creatures , from their singular formation ,
have often proved a stumbling - block in the way of the systematic naturalist ...

The Book of Shells


Galapagos Regained

The animal pens and birdcages were headed for the bottom of the ocean, but the
treasure still lay in Oxford, waiting to be borne away on the backs of ancient
tortoises and venerable iguanas. The Transmutationist Club would triumph yet.

Galapagos Regained

James Morrow's Galápagos Regained centers on the fictional Chloe Bathurst, an unemployed Victorian actress who finds work on Charles Darwin's estate, nurturing the strange birds, exotic lizards, and giant tortoises he brought back from his trip around the world. When Chloe gets wind of the Great God Contest, sponsored by the Percy Bysshe Shelley Society—£10,000 to the first petitioner who can prove or disprove the existence of a Supreme Being—she decides that Mr. Darwin's materialist theory of speciation might just turn the trick. (If Nature gave God nothing to do, maybe He was never around in the first place.) Before she knows it, her ambitions send her off on a wild adventure—a voyage by brigantine to Brazil, a steamboat trip up the Amazon, a hot-air balloon flight across the Andes—bound for the Galápagos archipelago, where she intends to collect the live specimens through which she might demonstrate evolutionary theory to the contest judges.

Folk Stories from Southern Nigeria West Africa

When the tortoise was satisfied with the beating the people had received he crept
to the door and opened it. ... She did so, and they gathered plenty of foofoo and
soup quite sufficient for the whole family for that day, and went back to their ...

Folk Stories from Southern Nigeria  West Africa

MANY years ago a book on the Folk-Tales of the Eskimo was published, and the editor of The Academy (Dr. Appleton) told one of his minions to send it to me for revision. By mischance it was sent to an eminent expert in Political Economy, who, never suspecting any error, took the book for the text of an interesting essay on the economics of "the blameless Hyperboreans." Mr. Dayrell's "Folk Stories from Southern Nigeria" appeal to the anthropologist within me, no less than to the lover of what children and older people call "Fairy Tales." The stories are full of mentions of strange institutions, as well as of rare adventures. I may be permitted to offer some running notes and comments on this mass of African curiosities from the crowded lumber-room of the native mind. I. The Tortoise with a Pretty Daughter.--The story, like the tales of the dark native tribes of Australia, rises from that state of fancy by which man draws (at least for purposes of fiction) no line between himself and the lower animals. Why should not the fair heroine, Adet, daughter of the tortoise, be the daughter of human parents? The tale would be none the less interesting, and a good deal more credible to the mature intelligence. But the ancient fashion of animal parentage is presented. It may have originated, like the stories of the Australians, at a time when men were totemists, when every person had a bestial or vegetable "family-name," and when, to account for these hereditary names, stories of descent from a supernatural, bestial, primeval race were invented. In the fables of the world, speaking animals, human in all but outward aspect, are the characters. The fashion is universal among savages; it descends to the Buddha's jataka, or parables, to sop and La Fontaine. There could be no such fashion if fables had originated among civilised human beings. The polity of the people who tell this story seems to be despotic. The king makes a law that any girl prettier than the prince's fifty wives shall be put to death, with her parents. Who is to be the Paris, and give the fatal apple to the most fair? Obviously the prince is the Paris. He falls in love with Miss Tortoise, guided to her as he is by the bird who is "entranced with her beauty." In this tribe, as in Homer's time, the lover offers a bride-price to the father of the girl. In Homer cattle are the current medium; in Nigeria pieces of cloth and brass rods are (or were) the currency. Observe the queen's interest in an affair of true love. Though she knows that her son's life is endangered by his honourable passion, she adds to the bride-price out of her privy purse. It is "a long courting"; four years pass, while pretty Adet is "ower young to marry yet." The king is very angry when the news of this breach of the royal marriage Act first comes to his ears. He summons the whole of his subjects, his throne, a stone, is set out in the market-place, and Adet is brought before him. He sees and is conquered.

The Maldive Shark

tortoises as well as turtles are of such a make, that if you but put them on their
backs you thereby expose their bright sides ... But after you have done this, and
because you have done this, you should not swear that the tortoise has no dark
side.

The Maldive Shark

'No voice, no low, no howl is heard; the chief sound of life here is a hiss.' Stories and poems by Herman Melville drawn from his years at sea Introducing Little Black Classics: 80 books for Penguin's 80th birthday. Little Black Classics celebrate the huge range and diversity of Penguin Classics, with books from around the world and across many centuries. They take us from a balloon ride over Victorian London to a garden of blossom in Japan, from Tierra del Fuego to 16th century California and the Russian steppe. Here are stories lyrical and savage; poems epic and intimate; essays satirical and inspirational; and ideas that have shaped the lives of millions. Herman Melville (1819-1891). Melville's works available in Penguin Classics are Moby-Dick, Pierre, The Confidence-Man, Omoo, Redburn, Israel Potter and Billy Budd, Sailor and Other Stories.

ADA Yearbook 1993

It isn't encumbered with all the rules and features of Ada . You Tortoises can
never catch up to us Hares as long as you need to carry that big Ada shell around
on your backs . " Get set , go The Tortoise team was feeling very sad because
they ...

ADA Yearbook 1993