Digital Media and Democracy

Geert Lovink was present as part of a two-day conference that crystallized the
questions of surveillance, the digital body, how Internet studies connect to
geography, how the Internet had been used in political campaigns, sociology of
blogging, ...

Digital Media and Democracy

The contributors of this text discuss broad questions of media and politics, offer nuanced analyses of change in journalism, and undertake detailed examinations of the use of web-based media in shaping political and social movements. The chapters include not only essays but also interviews with journalists and media activists.

Media and Democratic Transition in South Korea

Online. media. and. democracy. This chapter addresses the emerging role of
online media in the process of democratisation in Korea. In the first half of the
2000s, Korean online media had already become a major threat to the
mainstream ...

Media and Democratic Transition in South Korea

Since South Korea achieved partial democracy in 1987, the country has moved away from authoritarian political control. However, after two decades of democratic transition, South Korea still does not have a strong liberal, individualist culture – something that has brought about a wide range of scholarly discussion on the nature of democracy practised in this dynamic country. While the political changes in South Korea have received rigorous attention from Western scholars, less attention has been given to the changing nature and role of media in this and other such transitions. This book focuses on the changing role of media in the more democratised political landscape of South Korea. It thereby contributes to debates about the emerging role of the media in democratic transition, especially in relation to approaches that go beyond traditional Western constructs of media freedom and the relationship between the state and the media. In addition, it discusses the complex interacting forces that affect the role of the media and their implications for state control and democratisation.

Social Media and Democracy

Online. Empowered. but. Dutiful. Citizens? Ariadne. Vromen. Introduction. When
Istarted to write this chapter I noticed thatit was national Cyber Security
Awareness Week in Australia and the federal government agency, the Australian
 ...

Social Media and Democracy

This book critically investigates the complex interaction between social media and contemporary democratic politics, and provides a grounded analysis of the emerging importance of Social media in civic engagement. Social media applications such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube, have increasingly been adopted by politicians, political activists and social movements as a means to engage, organize and communicate with citizens worldwide. Drawing on Obama’s Presidential campaign, opposition and protests in the Arab states, and the mobilization of support for campaigns against tuition fee increases and the UK Uncut demonstrations, this book presents evidence-based research and analysis. Renowned international scholars examine the salience of the network as a metaphor for understanding our social world, but also the centrality of the Internet in civic and political networks. Whilst acknowledging the power of social media, the contributors question the claim it is a utopian tool of democracy, and suggests a cautious approach to facilitate more participative democracy is necessary. Providing the most up-to-date analysis of social media, citizenship and democracy, Social Media and Democracy will be of strong interest to students and scholars of Political Science, Social Policy, Sociology, Communication Studies, Computing and Information and Communications Technologies.

Media and Democracy

In the opening section of this volume, "Definitive Questions," chapters by Leo Bogart and Denis McQuail explore the contemporary relationship between media and democracy and its implications for the future.

Media and Democracy

While there is nearly universal agreement that the media play a vital and defining role in democracy everywhere it exists, ironically they are often unpopular. However, the media in a democratic system must be credible and reliable lest they lose their influence and authority. It is usually acknowledged that democracy almost never flourishes without an effective, independent media. The contributors to "Media and Democracy "discuss these issues with the clear recognition that generalizing about the media is often perilous. In the opening section of this volume, "Definitive Questions," chapters by Leo Bogart and Denis McQuail explore the contemporary relationship between media and democracy and its implications for the future. The next section, "Media and the Dynamics of Democracy Around the World," opens with contributions from Vaclav Havel and Boutros Boutros-Ghali, former secretary-general of the United Nations. They are joined by authors who examine the relationship between media and democracy in specific locations around the world. The third part, "Journalism as a Democratic Discipline," explores the demands that democracy makes on journalists in chapters by Robert MacNeil, Brian Mulroney, and Margaret T. Gordon. In the final"section, "Democracy and New Media," Lawrence K. Grossman, Sara B. Ivry, and Andrew C. Gordon consider the implications for democracy of new media technologies. Christopher Dornan concludes the book with a review essay examining recent books on media and democracy. Ideally, democracy and media coexist and support each other through a process of negotiation hopefully aimed at developing a consensus about the public interest. "Media and Democracy "is an intriguing examination of these two important ingredients to American society. It will be of value to political scientists, communications scholars, media specialists, and sociologists.

Democracy and New Media

Essays on the promise and dangers of the Internet for democracy.

Democracy and New Media

Essays on the promise and dangers of the Internet for democracy.

The Internet and Democracy Building in Lusophone African Countries

part III aims to address the Internet in more detail, describing the online media
and online political environment of each of the lusophone african countries in
relation to their media and political systems. a fundamental question shapes, ...

The Internet and Democracy Building in Lusophone African Countries

This timely book fills an important gap in the literature on the influence of the Internet and new media on Portuguese speaking African countries. Based on extensive field work throughout the region, the author examines the influence of the Internet in the transition to democracy in Africa, and asks whether there are new possibilities for popular activism to emerge from evolving communication environments and media systems.

Media and Democracy in Africa

There is little doubt that the Internet and the World Wide Web are changing the
way Americans communicate. People can work, learn, be entertained, even do
their banking online. The political uses of these media mechanisms may still be
less ...

Media and Democracy in Africa

Recent discussion of democratization in Africa has focused primarily on the reform of formal state institutions: the public service, the judiciary, and the legislature. Similarly, both scholars and activists have shown interest in how associational life-and with it a civil society-might be enhanced in the countries of the African continent. Much less concern, however, has been directed to the communications media, although they form a vital part of this process. Media and Democracy in Africa provides the first comprehensive and up-to-date assessment of the role of the media in political change in sub-Saharan Africa. The central argument of the volume is that while the media may still be relatively weak compared to their positions in liberal democracies, they have come to play a much more important role than ever before since independence. Although they have not yet demonstrated sufficient effectiveness as public watchdogs and agenda setters, they have succeeded in creating new communicative spaces for people who have previously been intimidated or silent. Building on this the contributors argue that a different conceptualization of democratization than the mainstream currently uses may be necessary to capture the process in Africa where it is characterized by contestation rather than consolidation. This volume shows that the media scene in Africa is diverse. It stretches from the well-developed and technologically advanced situation in South Africa to the still fledgling media operations that are typical in sub-Saharan Africa. In these countries, print media as well as television and radio are just beginning to take their place in society and do so using simple and often outdated technology. The volume also examines how these growing outlets are supplemented by informal media, the so-called radio trottoir, or rumor mill whereby the autocratic and bureaucratic direction of public affairs are subject to private speculation and analysis. Media and Democracy in Africa is organized to provide a historical perspective on the evolution of the African media, placing the present in the context of the past, including both colonial and post-colonial experiences. It will be of interest to Africa area specialists, students of media and communications, political scientists and sociologists. Goran Hyden is Distinguished Professor of Political Science at the University of Florida. Michael Leslie is associate professor in the College of Journalism and Communications at the University of Florida. Folu F. Ogundimu is associate professor in the School of Journalism at Michigan State University, East Lansing.

The Media in Transitional Democracies

It is almost a truism to say that the media are an indispensable part of a viable
democracy. ... possible by digitalization, the internet encompasses journalistic
forms of mass communication (online media, websites of established offline
outlets), ...

The Media in Transitional Democracies

The last quarter of a century has seen an unprecedented wave of democratization around the globe. In these transitions from authoritarian rule to a more democratic order, the media have played a key role both by facilitating, but frequently also inhibiting, democratic practices to take root. This book provides an accessible and systematic introduction to the media in transitional democracies. It analyses the problems that occur when transforming the media into independent institutions that are able to inform citizens and hold governments to account. The book covers the following topics: normative conceptions of media and democracy; the role of the past in the transition process; the internet as a new space for democratic change; the persistence of political interference in emerging democracies; the interlocking power of media markets and political ownership; the challenges to journalistic professionalism in post-authoritarian contexts; the role of the media in divided societies; The book takes a global view by exploring the interplay of political and media transitions in different pathways of democratization that have taken place in Eastern Europe, Latin America, Africa and Asia. It will be of interest to advanced students and scholars who want a better understanding of the media outside established Western democracies. The book will also be of great value to policymakers and activists who are involved in strengthening the media in transitional democracies.

Managing Democracy in the Digital Age

Klinger U (2014) Mastering the art of social media. Swiss parties, the 2011
elections and digital challenges. Inf Commun Soc 16(5):717–736 Klinger U,
Svensson J (2014) The emergence of network media logic in political
communication: a ...

Managing Democracy in the Digital Age

In light of the increased utilization of information technologies, such as social media and the ‘Internet of Things,’ this book investigates how this digital transformation process creates new challenges and opportunities for political participation, political election campaigns and political regulation of the Internet. Within the context of Western democracies and China, the contributors analyze these challenges and opportunities from three perspectives: the regulatory state, the political use of social media, and through the lens of the public sphere. The first part of the book discusses key challenges for Internet regulation, such as data protection and censorship, while the second addresses the use of social media in political communication and political elections. In turn, the third and last part highlights various opportunities offered by digital media for online civic engagement and protest in the public sphere. Drawing on different academic fields, including political science, communication science, and journalism studies, the contributors raise a number of innovative research questions and provide fascinating theoretical and empirical insights into the topic of digital transformation.

Democracy s Fourth Wave

Since the commercialization of digital media, information infrastructure has
become a formative space for nurturing and organizing social action. Such
spaces are especially important for the public sphere in nondemocratic societies
because ...

Democracy s Fourth Wave

Did digital media really "cause" the Arab Spring, or is it an important factor of the story behind what might become democracy's fourth wave? An unlikely network of citizens used digital media to start a cascade of social protest that ultimately toppled four of the world's most entrenched dictators. Howard and Hussain find that the complex causal recipe includes several economic, political and cultural factors, but that digital media is consistently one of the most important sufficient and necessary conditions for explaining both the fragility of regimes and the success of social movements. This book looks at not only the unexpected evolution of events during the Arab Spring, but the deeper history of creative digital activism throughout the region.

Media Democracy

It aims to explore online forms of political participation as an adjunct of
democratic engagement with the contemporary online public sphere in Poland.
Our findings are contextualised within the notion of civic society, an ideological
force for ...

Media Democracy

It is a view commonly acknowledged that the mass media have a crucial role to play in the development and maintenance of democracy. It is a matter of greater controversy as to whether the media’s influence upon democracy is as constructive as it might be. This collection explores the various impacts upon democratic structures and processes of different media forms in different parts of the world. It examines the very different influences of the press in democratic Nigeria and post-Leveson Britain; it looks at how social media are used by politicians, voters and revolutionaries in the UK, Poland and the Arab Region; it investigates the political impact of media ownership in Britain, Italy and Argentina; and it asks whether we can ever hope to develop from being passive consumers of the mass media to active participants in modes of democratic citizenship underpinned by those media.

After the Internet Before Democracy

Partly with the help of feedback from online news media , the propaganda system
learns about social pluralization and how to design the “ guidance of opinion , ” a
tactic that should not be underestimated . The propaganda units and state ...

After the Internet  Before Democracy

China has lived with the Internet for nearly two decades. Will increased Internet use, with new possibilities to share information and discuss news and politics, lead to democracy, or will it to the contrary sustain a nationalist supported authoritarianism that may eventually contest the global information order? This book takes stock of the ongoing tug of war between state power and civil society on and off the Internet, a phenomenon that is fast becoming the centerpiece in the Chinese Communist Party's struggle to stay in power indefinitely. It interrogates the dynamics of this enduring contestation, before democracy, by following how Chinese society travels from getting access to the Internet to our time having the world's largest Internet population. Pursuing the rationale of Internet regulation, the rise of the Chinese blogosphere and citizen journalism, Internet irony, online propaganda, the relation between state and popular nationalism, and finally the role of social media to bring about China's democratization, this book offers a fresh and provocative perspective on the arguable role of media technologies in the process of democratization, by applying social norm theory to illuminate the competition between the Party-state norm and the youth/subaltern norm in Chinese media and society.

Democracy Media and Law in Malaysia and Singapore

Amanda Whiting and Tim Marjoribanks Introduction This chapter investigates
some of the limits that civil defamation law places upon the print and online
media's capacity to report the news and comment upon public affairs in Malaysia
and ...

Democracy  Media and Law in Malaysia and Singapore

Commentators on the media in Southeast Asia either emphasise with optimism the prospect for new media to provide possibilities for greater democratic discourse, or else, less optimistically, focus on the continuing ability of governments to exercise tight and sophisticated control of the media. This book explores these issues with reference to Malaysia and Singapore. It analyses how journalists monitor governments and cover elections, discussing what difference journalism makes; it examines citizen journalism, and the constraints on it, often self-imposed constraints; and it assesses how governments control the media, including outlining the development and current application of legal restrictions.

Democracy Online

The Internet was thought to herald new possibilities for political participation, if
not direct democracy, even in large and complex societies, as "electronic
democracy" might replace the mass-media democracy of sound-bite television.
However ...

Democracy Online

Taking a multidisciplinary approach that they identify as a "cyber-realist research agenda," the contributors to this volume examine the prospects for electronic democracy in terms of its form and practice--while avoiding the pitfall of treating the benefits of electronic democracy as being self-evident. The debates question what electronic democracy needs to accomplish in order to revitalize democracy and what the current state of electronic democracy can teach us about the challenges and opportunities for implementing democratic technology initiatives.

Mass Media and Political Communication in New Democracies

Although after the overthrow of the non-democratic regimes they proclaimed a
course towards the latter, their political future ... In such a situation of uncertainty
and ambivalence for the traditional mass media, the role of the Internet—as a
new ...

Mass Media and Political Communication in New Democracies

This book examines how political communication and the mass media have played a central role in the consolidation of emerging democracies around the world. Covering a broad range of political and cultural contexts, including Eastern and Southern Europe, Latin America, Asia and Africa, this new volume investigates the problems and conflicts arising in the process of establishing an independent media and competitive politics in post-autocratic societies. Considering the changing dynamic in the relationship between political actors, the media and their audience, the authors of this volume address the following issues: changing journalistic role perceptions and journalistic quality the reasons and consequences of persisting instrumentalization of the media by political actors the role of the media in election campaigns the way in which the citizens interpret political messages and the extent to which the media influence political attitudes and electoral behaviour the role of the Internet in building a democratic public sphere This book will be of great interest to all those studying and researching democracy and democratization, comparative politics, political communication, journalism, media and the Internet.

Media and democracy

Barbara Thomas Changing Media , Changing Policy Public Service Broadcasting
in the Digital Age The digital age has just started , but the speed at which it will
develop is not yet clear . This will be dependent on technological developments ...

Media and democracy


Media Democracy and Freedom

Potanin is better known as a metal tycoon , but his assets also included PROF -
Media , a holding that has two ... Up until a few years ago , a sizable chunk of
print and online media property still belonged to Vladimir Gusinsky and Boris ...

Media  Democracy and Freedom

This book does what few other works have done: it examines the role media have played in the larger political, economic and social transformations in the post communist space. An international group of scholars from various disciplines explore the complex relations between media, society, and the state in this region over the past twenty years, and present theoretical arguments that challenge dominant views. They scrutinize changes in the public sphere as well as the media itself, its role, format, agenda and quality in the context of changing values and shifting power relationships.

Can the Media Serve Democracy

Increasingly, citizens and businesses can go online for many public digital
government services. Similar initiatives have been tied to digital democracy, such
asefforts to support democratic institutions and processes, policy consultations,
and ...

Can the Media Serve Democracy

This landmark collection brings leading scholars in the field of political communication to debate one of the most important questions of our age: Can the media serve democracy? For the media to be democratic, they must enter into a positive relationship with their readers, viewers and listeners as citizens rather than consumers who buy things, audiences who gaze upon spectacles or isolated egos, obsessed with themselves. The media's first task is to remind people that they are inhabitants of a world in which they can make a difference. By enabling citizens to encounter and make sense of events, relationships and cultures of which they have no direct experience, the media constitute a public arena in which members of the public come together as more than passing strangers.

The Digital Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy

Independent journalists play a critical role in every healthy democracy. In many
different kinds of Muslim countries, new media technologies are transforming the
way news is both produced and consumed. Journalists use the internet to do ...

The Digital Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy

Around the developing world, political leaders face a dilemma: the very information and communication technologies that boost economic fortunes also undermine power structures. Globally, one in ten internet users is a Muslim living in a populous Muslim community. In these countries, young people are developing political identities online, and digital technologies are helping civil society build systems of political communication independent of the state and beyond easy manipulation by cultural or religious elites. With unique data on patterns of media ownership and technology use, The Digital Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy demonstrates how, since the mid-1990s, information technologies have had a role in political transformation. Democratic revolutions are not caused by new information technologies. But in the Muslim world, democratization is no longer possible without them.