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Only Yesterday

Author: Frederick Lewis Allen
Publisher: Open Road Media
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A history of roaring prosperity—and economic cataclysm: “The one account of America in the 1920s against which all others must be measured” (The Washington Post). Beginning November 11, 1918, when President Woodrow Wilson declared the end of World War I in a letter to the American public, and continuing through his defeat, Prohibition, the Big Red Scare, the rise of women’s hemlines, and the stock market crash of 1929, Only Yesterday, published just two years after the crash, chronicles a decade like no other. Allen, who witnessed firsthand the events he describes, immerses you in the era of flappers, speakeasies, and early radio, making you feel like part of history as it unfolds. This bestselling, enduring account brings to life towering historical figures including J. Pierpont Morgan, Henry Ford, Sigmund Freud, Albert Einstein, Al Capone, Babe Ruth, and Jack Dempsey. Allen provides insightful, in-depth analyses of President Warren G. Harding’s oil scandal, the growth of the auto industry, the decline of the family farm, and the long bull market of the late twenties. Peppering his narrative with actual stock quotes and breaking financial news, Allen tracks the major economic trends of the decade and explores the underlying causes of the crash. From the trial of Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti to the inventions, crazes, and revolutions of the day, this timeless work will continue to be savored for generations to come.


Only Yesterday

Author: Frederick Lewis Allen
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Only Yesterday

Author: Frederick Lewis Allen
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Rumors of Indiscretion

Author: Lawrence J. Nelson
Publisher: University of Missouri Press
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The Routledge Handbook of American Military and Diplomatic History

Author: Christos Frentzos
Publisher: Routledge
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The Routledge Handbook of U.S. Military and Diplomatic History provides a comprehensive analysis of the major events, conflicts, and personalities that have defined and shaped the military history of the United States in the modern period. Each chapter begins with a brief introductory essay that provides context for the topical essays that follow by providing a concise narrative of the period, highlighting some of the scholarly debates and interpretive schools of thought as well as the current state of the academic field. Starting after the Civil War, the chapters chronicle America's rise toward empire, first at home and then overseas, culminating in September 11, 2001 and the War on Terror. With authoritative and vividly written chapters by both leading scholars and new talent, maps and illustrations, and lists of further readings, this state-of-the-field handbook will be a go-to reference for every American history scholar's bookshelf.


Document based Assessment Activities for U S History Classes

Author: Kenneth Hilton
Publisher: Walch Publishing
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Covers significant eras in U.S. history. Encourages students to analyze evidence, documents, and other data to make informed decisions. Includes guidelines for students, answer prompts, and a scoring rubric. Develops essential writing skills.


Supreme City

Author: Donald L. Miller
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
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An award-winning historian surveys the astonishing cast of characters who helped turn Manhattan into the world capital of commerce, communication and entertainment --


Dryden s Second Hundred Years

Author: Elizabeth Denver Gutchess
Publisher: iUniverse
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Dryden's Second Hundred Years (Part I) chronicles life in a small farming village in Central New York during the first half of the twentieth century. But along with a close reading of the local scene-its telephones, roads, real and rumored milk strikes, and letters back home from the trenches of two wars-this narrative has a wide arc and rich texture: author Elizabeth Denver Gutchess dovetails local history with national and international events which shaped and countered it-as she explores connections and disconnections between this small community and the world at large. Essentially, in fact, Dryden's Second Hundred Years records a transformation of place, as Dryden's tightly woven social fabric slowly unraveled during the century, while ever-lengthening strands of road and cable reached farther and farther beyond this small hill-rimmed valley-weaving ever wider and more life-enhancing communities for the people who live here. At a time when the process of globalization outweighs all things local, however, it is important to keep balance. The global village, as many have warned, will be enriched not by neglecting the local but by taking care of it. One way to do that is simply to know and understand the local past. Like the body of fine work already produced by Dryden historians-and by local historians everywhere-this book might help us do that.


Guaranteed Pure

Author: Timothy Gloege
Publisher: UNC Press Books
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American evangelicalism has long walked hand in hand with modern consumer capitalism. Timothy Gloege shows us why, through an engaging story about God and big business at the Moody Bible Institute. Founded in Chicago by shoe-salesman-turned-revivalist Dwight Lyman Moody in 1889, the institute became a center of fundamentalism under the guidance of the innovative promoter and president of Quaker Oats, Henry Crowell. Gloege explores the framework for understanding humanity shared by these business and evangelical leaders, whose perspectives clearly differed from those underlying modern scientific theories. At the core of their "corporate evangelical" framework was a modern individualism understood primarily in terms of economic relations. Conservative evangelicalism and modern business grew symbiotically, transforming the ways that Americans worshipped, worked, and consumed. Gilded Age evangelicals initially understood themselves primarily as new "Christian workers--employees of God guided by their divine contract, the Bible. But when these ideas were put to revolutionary ends by Populists, corporate evangelicals reimagined themselves as savvy religious consumers and reformulated their beliefs. Their consumer-oriented "orthodoxy" displaced traditional creeds and undermined denominational authority, forever altering the American religious landscape. Guaranteed pure of both liberal theology and Populist excesses, this was a new form of old-time religion not simply compatible with modern consumer capitalism but uniquely dependent on it.


Politics and Religion in the White South

Author: Glenn Feldman
Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
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Politics, while always an integral part of the daily life in the South, took on a new level of importance after the Civil War. Today, political strategists view the South as an essential region to cultivate if political hopefuls are to have a chance of winning elections at the national level. Although operating within the context of a secular government, American politics is decidedly marked by a Christian influence. In the mostly Protestant South, religion and politics have long been nearly inextricable. Politics and Religion in the White South skillfully examines the powerful role that religious considerations and influence have played in American political discourse. This collection of thirteen essays from prominent historians and political scientists explores the intersection in the South of religion, politics, race relations, and southern culture from post--Civil War America to the present, when the Religious Right has exercised a profound impact on the course of politics in the region as well as the nation. The authors examine issues such as religious attitudes about race on the Jim Crow South; Billy Graham's influence on the civil rights movement; political activism and the Southern Baptist Convention; and Dorothy Tilly, a white Methodist woman, and her contributions as a civil rights reformer during the 1940s and 1950s. The volume also considers the issue of whether southerners felt it was their sacred duty to prevent American society from moving away from its Christian origins toward a new, secular identity and how this perceived God-given responsibility was reflected in the work of southern political and church leaders. By analyzing the vital relationship between religion and politics in the region where their connection is strongest and most evident, Politics and Religion in the White South offers insight into the conservatism of the South and the role that religion has played in maintaining its social and cultural traditionalism.