Harlequin Love Inspired May 2019 Box Set 1 of 2

Was it wise to open this box of delights and sink into the delicious sensation of actually being able to use the contents? Maybe she should wait until the microarray test results came back. Then she wouldn't get wrapped into dreams, ...

Harlequin Love Inspired May 2019   Box Set 1 of 2

Love Inspired brings you three new titles! Enjoy these uplifting contemporary romances of faith, forgiveness and hope. A PERFECT AMISH MATCH Indiana Amish Brides by Vannetta Chapman Positive he’s meant to stay a bachelor, Noah Graber enlists Amish matchmaker Olivia Mae Miller to set up three dates—and prove to his parents that relationships aren’t for him. But when he starts falling for Olivia Mae, can they forget their reasons for not marrying and build a future together? HIS WYOMING BABY BLESSING Wyoming Cowboys by Jill Kemerer When pregnant widow Kit McAllistor arrives at Wade Croft’s ranch hoping to stay in one of his cabins, Wade can’t turn away his childhood best friend—even if his ranch may soon be for sale. But he’s determined to keep his feelings for Kit and her baby strictly friendship. THE RANCHER’S REDEMPTION by Myra Johnson Including his property in the local historical society’s grand tour could have huge benefits for Kent Ritter, but he has no clue how to decorate it. So he strikes a deal with town newcomer Erin Dearborn—she’ll give him decorating advice if he’ll make repairs to her home.

Opening the Box of Delights

This visual celebration of The Box of Delights is written by a world expert on the text and showcases fascinating illustrations, photographs, letters, manuscripts and designs from Masefield's life and across all of the story's many ...

Opening the Box of Delights

John Masefield's fantasy novel The Box of Delights is an enduring Christmas classic. It has a unique place in children's literature and continues to inspire and engage modern readers with its timeless adventure of ancient magic, good vanquishing evil, and Christmas miracles. For many, watching the 1984 BBC TV adaptation is a Christmas tradition and 'The Box of Delights Appreciation Society' has over 2,000 members on Facebook! This visual celebration of The Box of Delights is written by a world expert on the text and showcases fascinating illustrations, photographs, letters, manuscripts and designs from Masefield's life and across all of the story's many manifestations - through the different editions of the book (whose illustrators included Quentin Blake), and adaptations on television, radio and stage. With a foreword by award-winning children's author Piers Torday.

Landscape in Children s Literature

John Masefield, The Box ofDelights (1935) Cooper was familiar with Masefield's work from an early age. In an interview with Leonard S. Marcus, she describes the radio adaptations of The Box of Delights and its prequel The Midnight Folk ...

Landscape in Children s Literature

This book provides a new critical methodology for the study of landscapes in children's literature. Treating landscape as the integration of unchanging and irreducible physical elements, or topoi, Carroll identifies and analyses four kinds of space — sacred spaces, green spaces, roadways, and lapsed spaces — that are the component elements of the physical environments of canonical British children's fantasy. Using Susan Cooper's The Dark Is Rising Sequence as the test-case for this methodology, the book traces the development of the physical features and symbolic functions of landscape topoi from their earliest inception in medieval vernacular texts through to contemporary children's literature. The identification and analysis of landscape topoi synthesizes recent theories about interstitial space together with earlier morphological and topoanalytical studies, enabling the study of fictional landscapes in terms of their physical characteristics as well as in terms of their relationship with contemporary texts and historical precedents. Ultimately, by providing topoanalytical studies of other children's texts, Carroll proposes topoanalysis as a rich critical method for the study and understanding of children's literature and indicates how the findings of this approach may be expanded upon. In offering both transferable methodologies and detailed case-studies, this book outlines a new approach to literary landscapes as geographical places within socio-historical contexts.

His Wyoming Baby Blessing

Wade wouldn't care if she opened the box in his house and came back for it later. Back at the garage, ... Was it wise to open this box of delights and sink into the delicious sensation of actually being able to use the contents?

His Wyoming Baby Blessing

She’s pregnant on his doorstep…Saddle up for this Wyoming Cowboys novel When his childhood friend Kit McAllistor shows up, widowed and pregnant, rancher Wade Croft offers her a place to stay…but he can’t offer her his heart. As old feelings begin to surface, past tragedies force Wade to ignore them. But on the brink of losing his ranch, will he also risk losing the woman he’s beginning to love…or can he cowboy up in time?

Falconer and the Death of Kings

... first let us open the box of delights for ourselves.' Bacon was hugely pleased by the look of puzzlement on Thomas's face that was caused by his suggestion. He took Thomas by his arm and led the young man back into the upper room.

Falconer and the Death of Kings

Master William Falconer returns in this chilling and atmospheric medieval murder mystery. - Oxford, January 1273. When Regent Master William Falconer receives a cryptic message from Friar Roger, an old friend whose experimental scientific ideas the church consider heretical, he travels to Paris to find him. On arrival, he discovers his friend has been incarcerated in a friary, and he must work to ensure that his scientific theories are not lost forever. But, unbeknownst to Falconer, King Edward has a task for him – one that will test even the Regent Master’s legendary powers of deduction.

Yeats Annual No 13

The example of Daniel Hoffman's visit in 1961 is cited by Alison Lurie in 'Opening the Box of Delights', The New York Review of Books, 21 December 1995, 48-53. 3. Masefield's future wife is included in the dedicatees of Salt-Water ...

Yeats Annual No  13

Yeats Annual is the leading international research-level journal devoted to the greatest twentieth-century poet in the English language. In this number there are new essays on Yeats's theatre by leading scholars such as Richard Allen Cave, Gregory N. Eaves and Masaru Sekine, while scholars from nine countries including Peter L. Caracciolo and Paul Edwards, Maneck H. Daruwala, William F. Halloran, Elisabeth Heine and Colleen MacKenna address such matters as 'Yeats and Maud Gonne: Marriage and the Astrological Record, 1908-9', Yeats's relations with Fiona Macleod and with Wyndham Lewis, the Ghost of Wordsworth, Philip Larkin and Seamus Heaney. There are new essays on A Vision , shorter bibliographical notes and reviews of ten new studies.

Pagan Themes in Modern Children s Fiction

Bramwell, Peter (2002b) 'Opening The Box of Delights' in Children's Literature in Education, Vol. 33, No. 2, June, pp. 117–129. Bramwell, Peter (2002c) The Magic of Susan Price's 'The Ghost Drum'. Dissertation presented in part ...

Pagan Themes in Modern Children s Fiction

Applying a range of critical approaches to works by authors including Susan Cooper, Catherine Fisher, Geraldine McCaughrean, Anthony Horowitz and Philip Pullman, this book looks at the formative and interrogative relationship between recent children's literature and fashionable but controversial aspects of modern Paganism.

Shimmering in a Transformed Light

Whatever the advantages and drawbacks of writing , as opposed to showing , the box of delights , at least one writer has ... As it opened , the box appeared to contain the hot coals , or logs , the flickering flames and smouldering ash ...

Shimmering in a Transformed Light

Although much has been written lately on the links between painting and writing, little or no attention has been paid to those moments in literature when the narrative stops to allow for the description of those objects we associate with still life. Rosemary Lloyd's book shows how fascinating this overlooked area is; how rich in suggestions of class, race, and gender; how much it indicates about human pleasures and about the experience of space and time. Lloyd focuses on the last two centuries, particularly at points marked by the irruption of images of contingency and rapid change into the fields of art: for example, the year of the Terror in French history; the decade in which Haussman's politically driven transformation of Paris led Baudelaire to write his great modernist poem "Le Cygne"; and "on or about December 1910," the date to which Virginia Woolf attributes a revolution in the definition of literary character. Lloyd's central concern lies with the ways in which the still life, written or painted, both evokes and attempts to deal with the sense of contingency. While she makes frequent reference to paintings, she focuses above all on written still lifes, particularly those moments when novels pause to address the subject matter of still life--a bowl of fruit, a hat rack, a desk cluttered with pens and papers--in ways that invite contemplation of other and broader cultural domains. She draws on literary and art works from Australia, England, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, and the United States.

Judge and Jurist

Nor have we opened the box of delights which awaits those with a proper taste for the competency of pure declarators, ... student or non-lawyer, to open the Disruption cases which have, for too long, remained closed and neglected.

Judge and Jurist

Lord Rodger of Earlsferry was a distinguished judge and scholar. He was a Justice of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom and the author of many high quality law journal articles and two books. Written in memory of Lord Rodger, this collection contains 47 essays by Lord Rodger's friends and colleagues from the UK and Europe. The essays reflect Lord Rodger's role as a leading judge and also his wide-ranging academic interests including Roman law, Scots law and legal history, and a miscellany of other topics. The authors in this volume are leading academics or judges, and a particularly notable feature is the nine essays written by Supreme Court justices. As the highest judges in the UK they provide a unique insight into the work of the Supreme Court, as well as Lord Rodger's work in the Court. The book also includes the memorial tributes to Lord Rodger which explain his remarkable legal career, including his roles as Lord Advocate (Senior Law Officer of Scotland) Lord President of the Court of Session, Lord of Appeal in Ordinary and, finally, Justice of the UK Supreme Court. The essays include personal reminiscences of Lord Rodger, helping the reader to understand why he was so highly regarded and why his untimely death has dealt such a devastating blow to law in the UK.

Courts the Church and the Constitution

Nor have we opened the box of delights which awaits those with a proper taste for the competency of pure declarators, the scope of defences to interim interdicts, the reconciling of overlapping jurisdictions and much, much more besides.

Courts  the Church and the Constitution

Commissioned by the Clark Foundation for Legal Education, this book is derived from the inaugural Jean Clark Lectures, hosted by the University of Aberdeen in 2007. Across three lectures, the Rt Hon. The Lord Rodger of Earlsferry discusses and analyses the legal and constitutional issues arising from the Disruption of the Church of Scotland in 1843 when the majority of leading ministers left the Church of Scotland to set up the Free Church. Lord Rodger takes a fresh look at the series of cases in the Court of Session and the House of Lords between 1837 and 1843 which led to the Disruption, showing how they gave rise to the most important constitutional crisis and challenge to the Courts' authority that had occurred since the 1707 Union."e;

Last Deception Of Palliser Wentwood

Palliser takes the box of delights into the big kitchen and locates his hammer, or rather the hammer he has purchased for his use with Hubert's funds. Scrupulous, he is, in spending their money. He is preparing to open the box, ...

Last Deception Of Palliser Wentwood

Palliser Wentwood, dangerously charming, has run away to England, leaving his farm in New Zealand, his beautiful wife Salome, his daughters, and his many creditors. Palliser is in search of a fortune, enough to restore the prosperity of farm and family. In Thule Hall, Herts, live the Lovelaces - Hubert and Blanche, brother and sister -both amazingly tall and immensely fat, shy and gothically retired. Engaged as butler, and posing as a grieving widower, Palliser turns his charms on Blanche, teasing out laughter and beauty where before there was only timidity. But will his deception succeed? Can he bring himself to ruin her? Or will Salome succumb to the gentle siege of Philip Butterworth, solicitor and suitor? An exceptional first novel, wise and funny and sad in equal measure, and peopled by a cast of characters as singular as they are delightful.

Poetry and the Realm of the Public Intellectual

With assonantal openings of 'ahs', the poet allows the box to open up with the different sights and smells of Mexico. A box of delights, the 'cajita', changes from a lacquered artisan object to an aromatic and picturesque scene, ...

Poetry and the Realm of the Public Intellectual

Gabriela Mistral, Cecilia Meireles, and Rosario Castellanos were three of the most important Latin American women writers of the 20th century. Prolific, contentious, and widely read and discussed from Spanish America to Brazil, they pushed the boundaries of what it meant to be women poets from the 1920s to the 1970s. Karen Pena explores how these three writers used poetry to oppose patriarchal discourse on topics ranging from marginalised peoples to issues on gender and sexuality. Poetry was a means for them to redefine their own feminised space, however difficult or odd it could turn out to be. In this study, we see how Gabriela Mistral travels to Mexico and finds the countryside a way to declare her own queer identity; many years later we find her re-imagining a frightening feminine space where she contests the terrible fate of Greek heroines. In Cecilia Meireles, we discover a writer at odds with her femininity, who declares herself androgynous. Like Mistral, she too travelled extensively, and we see her arguing against the wealth of capitalism and industrialisation when she travels to the United States in 1940. Rosario Castellanos straightforwardly argues for women's procreative rights in almost all of her poetry. And in an illuminating re-reading of Mistral, Castellanos allows the shadow of her predecessor to vocalise the tragedies of the inability to control woman's reproductive choices.

The Therapeutic Potential of Creative Writing

(Natalie Goldberg, Writing Down the Bones) Buttoned Opening the button box can be taking the lid off the 'Box of Delights'. No one has button boxes these days, I'm told – worn clothes are thrown away. I have two.

The Therapeutic Potential of Creative Writing

Writing is a means of making sense of experience, and of arriving at a deeper understanding of the self. The use of creative writing therapeutically can complement verbal discussions, and offers a cost- and time-effective way of extending support to depressed or psychologically distressed patients. Suitable both for health-care professionals who wish to implement therapeutic writing with their patients, and for those wishing to start writing creatively in order to help themselves, The Therapeutic Potential of Creative Writing provides practical, well tried and tested suggestions for beginning to write and for developing writing further. It includes ideas for writing individually and for directing groups, and explores journal writing, poetry, fiction, autobiography and writing out trauma, with established writers and those who have taken up writing for private enjoyment.

Pandora s Jar

The need to open it, to find out what's inside, only increases as the size of the box decreases. There is no sense of jeopardy in the BBC's 1984 adaptation of John Masefield's novel The Box of Delights, when the mysterious old ...

Pandora s Jar

'Funny, sharp explications of what these sometimes not-very-nice women were up to!' – Margaret Atwood, author of The Handmaid's Tale The Greek myths are among the world's most important cultural building blocks and they have been retold many times, but rarely do they focus on the remarkable women at the heart of these ancient stories. Stories of gods and monsters are the mainstay of epic poetry and Greek tragedy, from Homer to Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides, from the Trojan War to Jason and the Argonauts. And still, today, a wealth of novels, plays and films draw their inspiration from stories first told almost three thousand years ago. But modern tellers of Greek myth have usually been men, and have routinely shown little interest in telling women’s stories. And when they do, those women are often painted as monstrous, vengeful or just plain evil. But Pandora – the first woman, who according to legend unloosed chaos upon the world – was not a villain, and even Medea and Phaedra have more nuanced stories than generations of retellings might indicate. Now, in Pandora's Jar: Women in the Greek Myths, Natalie Haynes – broadcaster, writer and passionate classicist – redresses this imbalance. Taking Pandora and her jar (the box came later) as the starting point, she puts the women of the Greek myths on equal footing with the menfolk. After millennia of stories telling of gods and men, be they Zeus or Agamemnon, Paris or Odysseus, Oedipus or Jason, the voices that sing from these pages are those of Hera, Athena and Artemis, and of Clytemnestra, Jocasta, Eurydice and Penelope. 'A treasure box of classical delights. Never has ancient misogyny been presented with so much wit and style' - historian Amanda Foreman

How Did Long John Silver Lose his Leg

John Masefield, The Box of Delights (1935) Did John Masefield ever meet Adolf Hitler or Joseph Stalin? That he encountered the latter seems unlikely, the former not impossible. The reason for asking the question is related to one of his ...

How Did Long John Silver Lose his Leg

'How did Long John Silver Lose His Leg?' is a diverting tour through some of the bestloved classics of children's literature, addressing many of the unanswered questions that inspire intense speculation when the books are laid down. Could Bobbie's train really have stopped in time ('The Railway Children')? Did Beatrix Potter have the 'flu in 1909, and did this lead to a certain darkness in her work ('The Tale of Mr Tod')? Would the 'rugby football' played by Tom Brown be recognised by sportsmen today ('Tom Brown's Schooldays')? The authors speculate entertainingly and informatively on the anomalies and unexplained phenomena found in children's literature and, having established the cultural importance of children's books in the modern age, also consider the more serious issues raised by the genre. Why are we so defensive of the idyllic worlds presented in children's books? Why have some of our best-loved authors been outed as neglectful parents to their own children? Should we everseparate the book from its creator and appreciate the works of writers convicted of crimes against children? A treat for any enthusiast of children's literature, two of the most distinguished writers on the subject provide rich detail, witty explication, and serious food for thought.

Channeling the Future

John Masefield's The Box of Delights, adapted in 1984 for the BBC, is similar in that Kay Harker is returning home for the Christmas holidays, which he spends with his other children in a rural town.12 We hear nothing of Kay's parents ...

Channeling the Future

Though science fiction certainly existed prior to the surge of television in the 1950s, the genre quickly established roots in the new medium and flourished in subsequent decades. In Channeling the Future: Essays on Science Fiction and Fantasy Television, Lincoln Geraghty has assembled a collection of essays that focuses on the disparate visions of the past, present, and future offered by science fiction and fantasy television since the 1950s and that continue into the present day. These essays not only shine new light on often overlooked and forgotten series but also examine the 'look' of science fiction and fantasy television, determining how iconography, location and landscape, special effects, set design, props, and costumes contribute to the creation of future and alternate worlds. Contributors to this volume analyze such classic programs as The Twilight Zone, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, and The Man from U.N.C.L.E., as well as contemporary programs, including Star Trek: The Next Generation, Angel, Firefly, Futurama, and the new Battlestar Galactica. These essays provide a much needed look at how science fiction television has had a significant impact on history, culture, and society for the last sixty years.

Boys and Girls Forever

And what of the Box of Delights, which the old magician can no longer guard and must entrust to a child? From the outside it is only a small flat rectangle, nothing much to look at. But when it is opened, Kay sees inside “... what he ...

Boys and Girls Forever

Are some of the world's most talented children's book authors essentially children themselves? In this engaging series of essays, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Alison Lurie considers this theory, exploring children's classics from many eras and relating them to the authors who wrote them, including Little Women author Louisa May Alcott and Wizard of Oz author Frank Baum, as well as Dr. Seuss and Salman Rushdie. Analyzing these and many others, Lurie shows how these gifted writers have used children's literature to transfigure sorrow, nostalgia, and the struggles of their own experiences.

Draw Paint the Realm of Faerie

BOX OF DELIGHTS A Greek myth tells the story of Pandora, who was given a box by Zeus, ruler of the gods, which contained the evils and miseries of humanity and was told not to open it. Her natural curiosity got the better of her and she ...

Draw   Paint the Realm of Faerie

One of the world's finest fantasy artists, Ed Org, takes you on an awe-inspiring journey into the realm of faerie. This book presents practical step-by-step instructions on pencil and colour techniques to help you to create beautiful faerie characters in striking surroundings. It includes an indispensable photo reference of models and props, including costumes, masks and weapons, which you can use to get the most out of your faerie art. It concludes with a stunning gallery selection of Ed Org's finest pieces, topping off a truly inspiring package for any lover of this magical realm.

Camp Hero

“Every woman, no matter how old, needs an excuse,” she said shyly, cutting the string, opening the box to reveal an ... That's not going to stop me so don't let it stop you,” she tempted him, pushing the box of delights closer.

Camp Hero

In a time of war, morality is overcome by the unthinkable. The unthinkable justified by fear and circumstances beyond our control. From uncontrollable circumstances emerges a new world of terror. To fight this terror we sacrifice our morality further and go beyond the unthinkable. The remnants of this vicious cycle turn with a momentum all their own and live on long after the treaties are signed. This is the fuel that sustains us between conflicts. This is the catalyst that ignites our creativity and spawns new technologies of war. We are united through common enemies, even though our greatest enemy is our own fear. For David Andrews, his peaceful existence collided with the reverberations of a war written into history books decades earlier. As the reality of these uncontrollable events swamp over him he comes face-to-face with the unthinkable. The cyclone of a war that will not die will test his fear of the unknown by redefining everything he knew to be true and replacing it with an alternate universe. An alternate set of events sent into motion the day of his birth. A universe created by the cold war in a long forgotten US military base called Camp Hero. Camp Hero State Park is located on the south fork of Long Island, just west of the Montauk Point Lighthouse. The Montauk Point Lighthouse was commissioned by General George Washington in 1792 during the Revolutionary War. In 1929, during WWI the US Army established Fort Hero, named after Major General Andrew Hero, Jr. who was the Army's Chief of Coastal Artillery. In 1942, during WWII the US Army upgraded the defenses of Fort Hero to deal with the growing threat of German invasion and Camp Hero was born. Camp Hero was eventually turned over to the Air Force in 1950 to become part of the National Air Defense system. Finally, in 1984 the land was turned over to the New York State Department of Parks. Conspiracy theorists believe the base is still operational today and the science being developed is out of this world.