The Global Organ Shortage

This book proposes compensating organ donors within a publicly controlled monopsony. This proposal is quite similar to current practice in Spain, where compensation for cadaveric donation now occurs "in secret," as this text reveals.

The Global Organ Shortage

Although organ transplants provide the best, and often the only, effective therapy for many otherwise fatal conditions, the great benefits of transplantation go largely unrealized because of failures in the organ acquisition process. In the United States, for instance, more than 10,000 people die every year either awaiting transplantation, or as a result of deteriorating health exacerbated by the shortage of organs. Issues pertaining to organ donation and transplantation represent, perhaps, the most complex and morally controversial medical dilemmas aside from abortion and euthanasia. However, these quandaries are not unsolvable. This book proposes compensating organ donors within a publicly controlled monopsony. This proposal is quite similar to current practice in Spain, where compensation for cadaveric donation now occurs "in secret," as this text reveals. To build their recommendations, the authors provide a medical history of transplantation, a history of the development of national laws and waiting lists, a careful examination of the social costs and benefits of transplantation, a discussion of the causes of organ shortages, an evaluation of "partial" reforms tried or proposed, an extensive ethical evaluation of the current system and its competitors.

Organ Shortage

Organ shortage is an ongoing problem in many countries. The needless death and suffering which have resulted necessitate an investigation into potential solutions.

Organ Shortage

Organ shortage is an ongoing problem in many countries. The needless death and suffering which have resulted necessitate an investigation into potential solutions. This examination of contemporary ethical means, both practical and policy-oriented, of reducing the shortfall in organs draws on the experiences of a range of countries. The authors focus on the resolution and negotiation of ethical conflict, examine systems approaches such as the 'Spanish model' and the US Breakthrough Collaboratives, evaluate policy proposals relating to incentives, presumed consent, and modifications regarding end-of-life care, and evaluate the greatly increased use of (non-heart-beating) donors suffering circulatory death, as well as living donors. The proposed strategies and solutions are not only capable of resolving the UK's own organ-shortage crisis, but also of being implemented in other countries grappling with how to address the growing gap between supply and demand for organs.

The Organ Shortage Crisis in America

This book not only re-examines the important debate over whether to allow the sale of organs; it is also the first volume in the field to take a close look at alternative solutions to the organ shortage crisis.

The Organ Shortage Crisis in America

Nearly 120,000 people are in need of healthy organs in the United States. Every ten minutes a new name is added to the list, while on average twenty people die each day waiting for an organ to become available. Worse, our traditional reliance on cadaveric organ donation is becoming increasingly insufficient, and in recent years there has been a decline in the number of living donors as well as in the percentage of living donors relative to overall kidney donors. Some transplant surgeons and policy advocates have responded to this shortage by arguing for the legalization of the sale of organs among living donors. Andrew Flescher objects to this approach by going beyond concerns traditionally cited about social justice, commodification, and patient safety, and moving squarely onto the terrain of discussing what motivates major and costly acts of human selflessness. What is the most efficacious means of attracting prospective living kidney donors? Flescher, drawing on literature in the fields of moral psychology and economics, as well as on scores of interviews with living donors, suggests that inculcating a sense of altruism and civic duty is a more effective means of increasing donor participation than the resort to financial incentives. He encourages individuals to spend time with patients on dialysis in order to become acquainted with their plight and, as an alternative to lump-sum payments, consider innovative solutions that positively impact living donor participation that do not undermine the spirit of the National Organ Transplant Act of 1984. This book not only re-examines the important debate over whether to allow the sale of organs; it is also the first volume in the field to take a close look at alternative solutions to the organ shortage crisis.

Regulations Regarding Living Organ Donation in Europe

This book analyses whether the national legal regulations are also partly responsible for the organ shortage in the Member States of the European Union.

Regulations Regarding Living Organ Donation in Europe

Organ transplantation is a much-discussed subject, and the importance of living organ donation is increasing significantly. Yet despite all efforts, too few donor organs are available to help all patients in need. This book analyses whether the national legal regulations are also partly responsible for the organ shortage in the Member States of the European Union. In addition to a detailed analysis of the various national regulations, the main arguments in favour of and against legal restrictions on living organ donation are considered. Furthermore, the European Union’s authority is investigated, namely, whether it is entitled to establish statutory provisions for the Member States with respect to a harmonized regulation of living organ donation. Based on the results of the analysis, the author establishes a Best Practice Proposal for living organ donation.

Organ Transplantation in Times of Donor Shortage

This book analyzes the reasons for organ shortage and ventures innovative ideas for approaching this problem. It presents 29 contributions from a highly interdisciplinary group of world experts and upcoming professionals in the field.

Organ Transplantation in Times of Donor Shortage

This book analyzes the reasons for organ shortage and ventures innovative ideas for approaching this problem. It presents 29 contributions from a highly interdisciplinary group of world experts and upcoming professionals in the field. Every year thousands of patients die while waiting for organ transplantation. Health authorities, medical professionals and bioethicists worldwide point to the urgent and yet unsolved problem of organ shortage, which will be even intensified due to the increasing life expectancy. Even though the practical problem seems to be well known, the search for suitable solutions continues and often restricts itself by being limited through disciplinary and national borders. Combining philosophical reflection with empirical results, this volume enables a unique insight in the ethics of organ transplantation and offers fresh ideas for policymakers, health care professionals, academics and the general public.

Solutions to Organ Shortages for Transplantation

Scientific Essay from the year 2016 in the subject Health - Public Health, grade: 1, Egerton University, language: English, abstract: Organ transplantation has become one of the most reliable life-saving medical approaches in the medical ...

Solutions to Organ Shortages for Transplantation

Scientific Essay from the year 2016 in the subject Medicine - Public Health, grade: 1, Egerton University, language: English, abstract: Organ transplantation has become one of the most reliable life-saving medical approaches in the medical field. Miller et al. (2003) report “many lives have been saved that would not have been otherwise, and yet waiting lists for organs continue to increase” (par. 3). Historically, organ transplantation dates back to 1954 when the first human kidney was transplanted successfully. Later on in 1967, Christian Barnard carried out the first heart transplant. In general, a number of organ transplants were performed in 1960s including liver, pancreas and lung transplants, and this opened up treatment options for patients with organ failures. However, it is worth noting that, the success of organ transplant was enhanced by an array of clinical research findings. For instance, the discovery of immunosuppressive drugs, which prevented the rejection of organ grafts served as a significant breakthrough in organ transplantation. Currently, organ transplantation has gained popularity owing to its reliability although organ procurement and allocation laws appear to have limited its clinical use. Abouna (2008) reports “In the United States, for example, the number of patients on the waiting list in the year 2006 had risen to over 95,000 while the number of patient deaths was over 6,300” (p. 34). However, organ transplantation has been faced with unprecedented organ shortage crises. It has been reported that about 18 patients in the waiting list die every day owing to the shortage of organ donations (Rall, 2013). Therefore, this paper will provide solutions which appear relevant in addressing the shortage of organs available for transplantation.

Organ Shortage The Solutions

The contribution of transplantation and clinical immunology to advanced medicine is considerable and promising. The annual volumes in this series keep the reader abreast of these developments.

Organ Shortage  The Solutions

Organ Shortage: The Solutions is the latest subject in the Continuing Education series, organized by Fondation Marcel Mérieux and Université Claude Bernard in Lyon. The annual subject is chosen to reflect the status of the topical issues of the year, as taught by leading international experts. The contribution of transplantation and clinical immunology to advanced medicine is considerable and promising. The annual volumes in this series keep the reader abreast of these developments.

Organ Shortage in Switzerland

What are the reasons for the organ shortage in Switzerland?

Organ Shortage in Switzerland

What are the reasons for the organ shortage in Switzerland? Is it the unwillingness of people to donate their organs or the lack of education on this subject? The aim of my survey, which was composed of 149 participants, was to answer these questions. 83% of the participants of the survey would be willing to donate their organs. One can say that the people are willing to donate, because they would be able to help other people. The people who are not willing to donate do not want to burden their family with an organ donation after their death and do not quite agree with the definition of death by the brain death concept. It seems that there is a severe lack of knowledge about the law which regulates the organ extraction in Switzerland. Only few know what the opt-in system is and even fewer people know where and how to get an organ donor card, which also might be an explanation for the low percentage of people who own an organ donor card. As a result of the lack of education on this subject, 70% of the participants of my survey do not have a donor card, even though they actually would be willing to donate their organs.

A Socio legal Study on Organ Shortage in Malaysia

Human organs are the most valuable gifts of life.

A Socio legal Study on Organ Shortage in Malaysia

Human organs are the most valuable gifts of life. Until today, through organ transplantation, thousands of lives have been saved and many more blessed with hope and happiness through a better quality of living. However, rapid developments in transplant technology will be meaningless if supply of the needed organs remains scarce and organ transplantation procedures cannot take place accordingly. This global problem of organ shortage is also faced by Malaysia. Despite campaigns and initiatives introduced by the Malaysian authorities, the problem remains unresolved and the situation is worsening. Malaysia is reported to have less than one donor for everyone thousand of the population (Le la Yasmin Mansor, 2007). However, statistics from the National Transplant Registry Malaysia confirm a steady increase in the number of registered potential donors each year. This suggests that certain factors must be preventing potential donors from becoming actual donors. Therefore, this study will not only discuss the current scenario of the organ shortage problem in Malaysia, highlighting its underlying factors, but will also scrutinise legal and social factors causing actual donations to remain relatively small, despite the promising number of potential donors registering each year. The study will suggest practical solutions to help solve organ shortages in Malaysia, particularly by utilising brain-dead patients from serious road traffic accidents as a potential source of cadaveric organs. Clarification on the Islamic perspective concerning organ donation is also included, as Islam is the main religion professed in Malaysia.

Organ Donation in Japan

In this book, Yasuoka reveals insight into Japan as the country with the most severe organ shortages and the lowest numbers of organ donations among medically advanced countries.

Organ Donation in Japan

In this book, Yasuoka reveals insight into Japan as the country with the most severe organ shortages and the lowest numbers of organ donations among medically advanced countries. This is the first book to delve into the challenging and taboo Japanese concepts of life and death surrounding organ transplantation.

Organ Shortage The Solutions

This lack of trust in the medical profession seems to result in less consent towards organ donation. This trend worries all who are involved with organ transplantation, but actual data regarding consent toward organ donation in families ...

Organ Shortage  The Solutions

Organ Shortage: The Solutions is the latest subject in the Continuing Education series, organized by Fondation Marcel Mérieux and Université Claude Bernard in Lyon. The annual subject is chosen to reflect the status of the topical issues of the year, as taught by leading international experts. The contribution of transplantation and clinical immunology to advanced medicine is considerable and promising. The annual volumes in this series keep the reader abreast of these developments.

The Organ Shortage Crisis in America

Is there a third alternative for solving the organ shortage crisis other than the capitalist's prescription of paying for organs or the purist's competing notion never to do so? We will explore possibilities for addressing the shortage ...

The Organ Shortage Crisis in America

Nearly 120,000 people are in need of healthy organs in the United States. Every ten minutes a new name is added to the list, while on average twenty people die each day waiting for an organ to become available. Worse, our traditional reliance on cadaveric organ donation is becoming increasingly insufficient, and in recent years there has been a decline in the number of living donors as well as in the percentage of living donors relative to overall kidney donors. Some transplant surgeons and policy advocates have responded to this shortage by arguing for the legalization of the sale of organs among living donors. Andrew Flescher objects to this approach by going beyond concerns traditionally cited about social justice, commodification, and patient safety, and moving squarely onto the terrain of discussing what motivates major and costly acts of human selflessness. What is the most efficacious means of attracting prospective living kidney donors? Flescher, drawing on literature in the fields of moral psychology and economics, as well as on scores of interviews with living donors, suggests that inculcating a sense of altruism and civic duty is a more effective means of increasing donor participation than the resort to financial incentives. He encourages individuals to spend time with patients on dialysis in order to become acquainted with their plight and, as an alternative to lump-sum payments, consider innovative solutions that positively impact living donor participation that do not undermine the spirit of the National Organ Transplant Act of 1984. This book not only re-examines the important debate over whether to allow the sale of organs; it is also the first volume in the field to take a close look at alternative solutions to the organ shortage crisis.

Organ Donation and Transplantation

This book provides an analysis and overview of public policy developments and clinical developments that will hopefully ensure an increased availability of organs and greater graft survival.

Organ Donation and Transplantation

Transplantation has succeeded in prolonging the lives of those fortunate enough to have received the gift of a body organ. Alongside this life-saving development, there lies another sadder side to the story - there are not enough organs to meet the ever increasing demand. This not only places an increasing emotional and physical burden among the waiting patients and families but heaps a great financial burden upon health services. This book provides an analysis and overview of public policy developments and clinical developments that will hopefully ensure an increased availability of organs and greater graft survival. Medical, policy, and academic experts from around the world have contributed chapters to the book.

Organ Donation

This book urges federal agencies, nonprofit groups, and others to boost opportunities for people to record their decisions to donate, strengthen efforts to educate the public about the benefits of organ donation, and continue to improve ...

Organ Donation

Rates of organ donation lag far behind the increasing need. At the start of 2006, more than 90,000 people were waiting to receive a solid organ (kidney, liver, lung, pancreas, heart, or intestine). Organ Donation examines a wide range of proposals to increase organ donation, including policies that presume consent for donation as well as the use of financial incentives such as direct payments, coverage of funeral expenses, and charitable contributions. This book urges federal agencies, nonprofit groups, and others to boost opportunities for people to record their decisions to donate, strengthen efforts to educate the public about the benefits of organ donation, and continue to improve donation systems. Organ Donation also supports initiatives to increase donations from people whose deaths are the result of irreversible cardiac failure. This book emphasizes that all members of society have a stake in an adequate supply of organs for patients in need, because each individual is a potential recipient as well as a potential donor.

Organ Shortage

The contribution of transplantation and clinical immunology to advanced medicine is considerable and promising. The annual volumes in this series keep the reader abreast of these developments.

Organ Shortage

This text, part of the Continuing Education series reflects the latest developments in the area of transplantation and organ shortage, and offers solutions to the problems faced."

Factors Influencing Intention and Behaviour for Organ Donation

Conclusion. This review highlights factors could influence individual's intention and behavior for organ donation. Potential implications could be implemented base on the effect of these factors.

Factors Influencing Intention and Behaviour for Organ Donation

This dissertation, "Factors Influencing Intention and Behaviour for Organ Donation: a Systematic Review" by Yilin, Jiao, 焦怡琳, was obtained from The University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong) and is being sold pursuant to Creative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License. The content of this dissertation has not been altered in any way. We have altered the formatting in order to facilitate the ease of printing and reading of the dissertation. All rights not granted by the above license are retained by the author. Abstract: Background. Organ transplantation as one of the most effective treatment options for patients with organ failure is challenged by organ shortage around the world. This systematic review aims to summary relevant factors influencing people's intention and behavior for organ donation. Method. Three databases, namely PUB med, Medline and China knowledge resources integrated database, were applied for literature searching. Fourteen studies, which meet the inclusion criteria and exclusion criteria, are used in this review. Quality assessment was proceeding upon STROBE checklist. Results. Seven factors influencing individuals' intentions and behavior for organ donation are summarized, including: demographic factors, cultural factors, attitudes towards death and funeral, family influence, information accessibility for organ donation, distrust medical community and legislation for organ donation. In addition, two more factors, acceptance of brain death and effectiveness in receiving donation request, are associated with family consent to organ donation. Conclusion. This review highlights factors could influence individual's intention and behavior for organ donation. Potential implications could be implemented base on the effect of these factors. Possible interventions, upon demographic characteristics, dealing with Chinese traditional concept and enhancing knowledge and exposure of organ donation, to Chinese population are discussed. Limitations of this systematic review are also mentioned. DOI: 10.5353/th_b5098616 Subjects: Donation of organs, tissues, etc

Organ Donation

Readers will learn about poverty and organ donation, illegal trafficking of organs, and compensation for donation. This book also examines the presumed consent of opt-in / opt-out laws.

Organ Donation

This global-perspective guidebook explores issues related to organ donation in various countries, including the United States, Spain, Australia, India, and Pakistan. Readers will learn about poverty and organ donation, illegal trafficking of organs, and compensation for donation. This book also examines the presumed consent of opt-in / opt-out laws. Essay sources include The Portugal News, Ami Cholia, Calev Ben-David, Habib Toumi, and Natsuko Fukue.