Organised Crime in Northern Ireland

Third Report of Session 2005-06

Organised Crime in Northern Ireland

Organised crime continues to have a damaging affect on society and on the economy of Northern Ireland. There is a continued involvement of paramilitaries from both loyalist and republican sides who exercise control over communities and instil a fear that leads to the under-reporting of crimes. Excise and tax fraud, intellectual property crime, extortion, drugs, armed robbery, money laundering and illegal dumping have been identified as the major areas of organised criminal activity. There is also evidence that human trafficking is an emerging problem. Because of the nature of the subject, this report, which occupied the Committee for over six months, is based on evidence given in private as well as that given at public hearings.

The Economics of Organised Crime

The Economics of Organised Crime

This book uses economic theory to analyze the different aspects of organized crime. The theory of rent-seeking is adopted to help understand the origin of criminal organizations, while modern industrial organization theory is used to explain the design of internal rules. The market behavior of organized crime is analyzed, the "crime and economics" approach being applied to the analysis of corruption that occurs when the organized crime sector and the government collude to exploit their monopoly on rule-making. Each chapter outlines the normative results of the analysis in order to design more sophisticated deterrence policies.

European Organised Crime Scenarios for 2015

European Organised Crime Scenarios for 2015

Policy makers no longer focus on repressive aspects of organised crime alone, but want to be informed about coming challenges and threats to allow them to take appropriate preventive action and target their reactive response better. For that reason, there is a growing demand to change the traditional assessments into analyses that include more prospective elements about current and potential future organised crime situations to identify specific risks or threats to society. The book outlines a methodology to perform analyses of long-term threats of organised crime and scenario studies and applies this on four case studies at two different levels: three studies at Member State level (Belgium, Slovenia, and Sweden) and one at the European Union level. ln a last chapter, conclusions and recommendations about the method and its applications are presented. The developed methodological tool and the scenarios are intended as a guide for action and consideration for all actors involved in the fight against organised crime.

Reporting on Organised Crime

A Shift from Description to Explanation in the Belgian Annual Report on Organised Crime

Reporting on Organised Crime

This book is the outcome of a six-month research contract undertaken by Ghent University's Research Group Drug Policy, Criminal Policy and International Crime for the Belgian Minister of Justice. Since 1996 the Belgian Government has produced Annual Reports on Organised Crime, and while currently this takes the form of a typically descriptive situation report there has always been the intention to further develop the methodology underwriting the report. It has been envisaged that such methodological development will rely upon the use of supplementary non-police data -both qualitative and quantitative - supporting the utilisation of more sophisticated analytical tools. Proceeding from earlier work undertaken by this research group for the Belgian Federal Police's Organised Crime Unit, this book is an elaboration of the ideas found in Measuring Organised Crime in Belgium: A Risk-Based Methodology (in which a method for determining the impact of organised crime in Belgium is proposed) for application in the context of the Annual Reports.Thus, the substance of this book is a discursive analysis of the issues surrounding a risk-based Annual Report on Organised Crime.As the result of applied research, Reporting on Organised Crime offers concrete recommendations and solutions for the analysis of organised crime and its reporting at the strategic level.

Organised Crime in Europe

The Threat of Cybercrime : Situation Report 2004

Organised Crime in Europe

Whilst the nature of organised crime may keep changing with the effects of globalisation, technological developments and European integration, its impact remains the same in terms of undermining democracy, human rights and the rule of law. The "Octopus Programme" is a technical co-operation programme against corruption and organised crime initiated by the Council of Europe in 1996. This publication reviews the organised crime situation in Europe in 2004, in order to help member states ensure that counter-measures are based on a thorough knowledge of trends and good practice. It includes a chapter on the challenge of cybercrime, with an analysis of the different forms of cybercrime, its links to organised crime and terrorism, and its socio-economic impacts.

Serious Organised Crime and Police Act 2005

Elizabeth II. Chapter 15

Serious Organised Crime and Police Act 2005

Royal assent, 7th April 2005. An Act to provide for the establishment and functions of the Serious Organised Crime Agency; to make provision about investigations, prosecutions, offenders and witnesses in criminal proceedings and the protection of persons involved in investigations or proceedings; to provide for the implementation of certain international obligations relating to criminal matters; to amend the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002; to make further provision for combatting crime and disorder, including new provision about powers of arrest and search warrants and about parental compensation orders; to make further provision about the police and policing and persons supporting the police; to make provision for protecting certain organisations from interference with their activities; to make provision about criminal records; to provide for the Private Security Industry Act 2001 to extend to Scotland. Explanatory notes have been produced to assist in the understanding of this Act and are available separately (ISBN 0105615056). With correction slips dated May 2005 and July 2005

Organised Crime

Organised Crime

This text provides a broadly based introduction to the increasingly important subject of organised crime. It explores all facets of organised crime, and contains case studies illustrating the growth of organised crime at national, international and transnational levels.

The Disruption of International Organised Crime

An Analysis of Legal and Non-Legal Strategies

The Disruption of International Organised Crime

Analyzing the structures of transnational organized crime, this book considers whether traditional mechanisms and national jurisdictions can tackle this increasing menace. Highlighting the strengths and weaknesses in the present methods of control, the book discusses the possibilities of developing more effective national and international strategies, the creation of non-legal mechanisms outside the traditional criminal justice system and the implications of 'disruption strategies'. The roles of law enforcement officers, tax investigators, financial intelligence officers, compliance officers, lawyers and accountants – in enforcing both civil and criminal sanctions on organized crime – are also considered.

Organised Crime and Vulnerability of Economic Sectors

The European Transport and Music Sector

Organised Crime and Vulnerability of Economic Sectors

The influence of organised crime on business activities, enterprises and economic sectors is a matter of concern for many policy makers across the world. As a profit driven criminal activity, organised crime operates in an environment which is not limited to the underworld economy alone. Assessments of the threat posed by organised crime and strategic (preventive) actions to tackle this phenomenon require an understanding of the vulnerable spots in the legal economy that are or might be exploited by crime. This book proposes a new methodology to scan economic sectors on their vulnerability to organised crime and provides vulnerability profiles of the transport and the music sector in Europe to which the method has been tested in a case-study. The developed methodological tool and the vulnerability profiles of both sectors are intended as a guide for actions and initiatives to be taken by governments, law enforcement bodies or economic sectors.

Organised Crime in Europe

Concepts, Patterns and Control Policies in the European Union and Beyond

Organised Crime in Europe

This volume represents the first attempt to systematically compare organised crime concepts, as well as historical and contemporary patterns and control policies in thirteen European countries. These include seven ‘old’ EU Member States, two ‘new’ members, a candidate country, and three non-EU countries. Based on a standardised research protocol, thirty-three experts from different legal and social disciplines provide insight through detailed country reports. On this basis, the editors compare organised crime patterns and policies in Europe and assess EU initiatives against organised crime.