Religion in Roman Britain

Apart from Christianity and the Oriental Cults, religion in Roman Britain is often discussed as though it remained basically Celtic in belief and practice, under a thin veneer of Roman influence.

Religion in Roman Britain

Apart from Christianity and the Oriental Cults, religion in Roman Britain is often discussed as though it remained basically Celtic in belief and practice, under a thin veneer of Roman influence. Using a wide range of archaeological evidence, Dr Henig shows that the Roman element in religion was of much greater significance and that the natural Roman veneration for the gods found meaningful expression even in the formal rituals practised in the public temples of Britain.

Military Religion in Roman Britain

This publication presents and discusses epigraphic and archaeological evidence for religions practiced by the soldier in Roman Britain, emphasizing the religious interactions between soldier and native, and the cultural, social, and ...

Military Religion in Roman Britain

This publication presents and discusses epigraphic and archaeological evidence for religions practiced by the soldier in Roman Britain, emphasizing the religious interactions between soldier and native, and the cultural, social, and political uses of military religion.

Roman Britain

The best is M. Henig , Religion in Roman Britain ( 1984 ) , while the Celtic aspect is examined by M. Green , The Gods ... of the Roman Empire ( 1986 ) , and there is much of value in J.R. and E. Harris , Oriental Cults in Roman Britain ...

Roman Britain

Pieces together archaeological evidence with fragmentary writings of Caesar, Tacitus, and others to give a picture of Roman Britain

The Roman Imperial Army of the First and Second Centuries A D

102-16 E. and J. R. Harris , The Oriental Cults in Roman Britain , Leiden , 1965 J. Hegeland , ' Roman Army Religion ' , Augstieg ii , Principat , Band 2 , pp . 1470-1505 M. Henig , ' The Veneration of Heroes in the Roman Army ' ...

The Roman Imperial Army of the First and Second Centuries A D

This classic work of scholarship scrutinizes all aspects of Roman military forces throughout the Roman Empire, in Europe, North Africa, and the Near and Middle East. Graham Webster describes the Roman army’s composition, frontier systems, camps and forts, activities in the field (including battle tactics, signaling, and medical services), and peacetime duties, as well as the army’s overall influence in the Empire. First published in 1969, the work is corrected and expanded in this third edition, which includes new information from excavations and the finding of contemporary scholars. Hugh Elton provides an introduction surveying scholarship on the Roman army since the last edition of 1985.

The Cult of Mithras in the Roman Provinces of Gaul

Its place of origin therefore lies outisde Roman Gaul. ... Select Bibliography J. M. C. Toynbee, Art in Roman Britain, London 1962, p. 153, no. 69, pl. 73. E. & J. R. Harris, The Oriental Cults in Roman Britain, Leiden 1965, pp.

The Cult of Mithras in the Roman Provinces of Gaul


Roman Britain

Dumville, D. N., 'Sub-Roman Britain: History and Legend', History, 62, 1977, 173–92. Eichholz, D. E., 'How Long Did Vespasian Serve in Britain? ... Harris, E. and Harris, J. R., The Oriental Cults in Roman Britain, Leiden: Brill ...

Roman Britain

Roman Britain: A Sourcebook has established itself as the only comprehensive collection of source material on the subject. It incorporates literary, numismatic and epigraphic evidence for the history of Britain under Roman rule, as well as translations of major literary sources. This new edition includes not only recently discovered material, but also the texts of Caesar’s commentaries on his expeditions to Britain in 55 and 54 BC, as well as relevant sections of Tacitus’ biography of his father-in-law, former governor of Britain. The inclusion of these pivotal texts, which provide the most detailed account of the Romans campaigns in Britain, significantly underlies the volume’s usefulness to all students of Roman Britain. Though most of the material is arranged chronologically, there are also thematic sections on geography, religion and social and economic activity. Each section is prefaced by an introductory note, and the inclusion of illustrations and maps enhances the attractiveness of this updated collection as a teaching tool and a work of reference.

Roman Britain

Bowman A.K. Life and Letters on the Roman Frontier ( London , 1994 ) Bowman A.K. and Thomas J.D. The Vindolanda ... 73-89 Harris E. and Harris J.R. The Oriental Cults in Roman Britain ( Leiden , 1965 ) Hassall M. ' The Date of the ...

Roman Britain

This revised edition of the classic text of the period provides both the student and the specialist with an informative account of post-Roman English society. ...

Roman Britain

93-114 Burn A.R. The Romans in Britain: An Anthology of Inscriptions, 2nd edn (Black- well, 1969) Casey J. 'Constantine ... 73-89 Harris E. and Harris J.R. The Oriental Cults in Roman Britain (Leiden, 1 965) Hassall M. 'The Date of the ...

Roman Britain

This revised edition of the classic text of the period provides both the student and the specialist with an informative account of post-Roman English society.

Religion in Late Roman Britain

Harris, E. and Harris, J. R. (1965) The Oriental Cults in Roman Britain, Leiden: Brill. Haselgrove, C. (1990) 'Stanwick', Curr. Archaeol. 10.12: 380– 4. Henig, M.(1984) Religionin Roman Britain, London: Batsford.

Religion in Late Roman Britain

Religion in Late Roman Britain explores the changes in religion over the fourth century; the historical background for these changes and the forces which contributed to them. Dorothy Watts examines the reasons for the decline of Christianity and the continuation of the pagan, Celtic cults in Britain. The author establishes a chronology for the rise and decline of Christianity, based on the available archaeological evidence, and she charts the fate of the pagan cults and temples in the fourth century. The author discusses the nature of Romano-British pagan religion and she analyses the controversial rite of decapitated burial in the light of some startling new archaeological evidence.

The cult of Isis among women in the Graeco Roman world

Harris, E., and J. R., The Oriental Cults in Roman Britain (Leiden 1965). Hatzfeld, J., “Les italiens résidant à Délos,” BCH 36 (1912) 5-218. —, Les trafiquants italiens dans l'orient hellenistique (Paris 1919) ...

The cult of Isis among women in the Graeco Roman world


The Cult of Isis Among Women in the Graeco Roman World

Harris , E. , and J. R. , The Oriental Cults in Roman Britain ( Leiden 1965 ) . Hatzfeld , J. , “ Les italiens résidant à Délos , ” BCH 36 ( 1912 ) 5-218 . Les trafiquants italiens dans l'orient hellénistique ( Paris 1919 ) ...

The Cult of Isis Among Women in the Graeco Roman World


Roman Sculpture from the North West Midlands

169 , pl . xl ; Harris and Harris , The Oriental Cults in Roman Britain ( 1965 ) , pp . 44 , 103 . H. 0.69m ; W. 0.30m ; D. 0.24m . Carved in relief . Sandstone . A youth wearing a Phrygian cap , a belted tunic and a cloak stands with ...

Roman Sculpture from the North West Midlands

This is the first comprehensive catalogue of the sculpture from this region of Roman Britain, including the first proper record of the sculpture from Wroxeter. The sculptures, all in local sandstone, were carved locally and provide an index of Romanisation in the far north-west of the Roman Empire - at the Fortress of Legio II Adivtrix and then Legio XX Valeria Victrix at Devra (Chester), and at the Fortress and subsequently the civil town of the Cornovii at Viroconium (Wroxeter). The sculpture from Letcetum (Wall, Staffs) is also considered. The works range in quality from highly accomplished and decorative altars and tombstones, to rather ham-fisted efforts which hint that it was not always possible to attract sculptors to these relatively remote places. Such factors are discussed in an extended introduction.