Origen

An exposition challenging inveterate verdicts ingrained in the historical / theological mindset about Origen, who is shown to have produced a sheerly new theory of Time, the Christian one.

Origen

An exposition challenging inveterate verdicts ingrained in the historical / theological mindset about Origen, who is shown to have produced a sheerly new theory of Time, the Christian one. Claims attributing the tenet of a 'beginningless world' to him are disproved. The author challenges the widespread impression about this theology being bowled head over heels by its encounter with Platonism or Neoplatonism, casting new light on Origen's grasp of the relation between Hellenism, Hebrew thought and Christianity.

Origen

Against claims that Origen causes History to evaporate into barren idealism, his theology is shown to have no other source and aim than historical occurences.

Origen

Against claims that Origen causes History to evaporate into barren idealism, his theology is shown to have no other source and aim than historical occurences. Fronting assertions that he has no eschatological ideas, this Eschatology is explicated in all its clarity. Light is cast upon the Aristotelian character of Origen's doctrine of "apokatastasis," proving this based on "ontological" necessity, not a "historical" one.

Zeit und Ewigkeit als Raum g ttlichen Handelns

Auf diesen Text bin ich aufmerksam geworden durch P. Tzamalikos, Origen. Cosmology and Ontology of Time, 213. 25 Zur allgemeinen Bedeutung von alcbv bei den Dichtern, die Aristoteles aufgreift, siehe A. J. Festugiere, ...

Zeit und Ewigkeit als Raum g  ttlichen Handelns

The volume contains the papers from an international symposium held in 2007 by the Gottingen Graduate School on Images of Gods Images of God World Views: Polytheism and Monotheism in the Antique World. Working from the topic of Time and Eternity as Places of Divine Action, the contributors examine differing conceptions of time and eternity in a cultural region with intensive exchange. The papers deal with the Ancient Orient (Egypt, Mesopotamia, Iran), ancient philosophy (Aristotle, Plato, Stoa) and the three world religions Judaism, Christianity and Islam. "

Guilty of Genius

"This is an important new contribution to our understanding of Origen and of early Christian theology in general.

Guilty of Genius

"This is an important new contribution to our understanding of Origen and of early Christian theology in general. Casting both forwards and backwards in time, Guilty of Genius: Origen and the Theory of Transmigration illustrates Origen's debt to earlier Christian authors and Greek philosophers, as well as his enormous influence on later Christian theologians such as the Cappadocians and Maximus Confessor. Building on his earlier books, which have overturned erroneous but long-established assertions about Origen, the author plots a new trajectory, bringing together threads from earlier works into a coherent and focused treatment, and rebutting the myth that Origen maintained theories such as pre-existence and the transmigration of souls. This is a seminal and significant contribution to the scholarship of early Christianity and the Greek intellectual world of the second and third century"--

Anaxagoras Origen and Neoplatonism

Tzamalikos, P., “Origen, The Source of Augustine's Theory of Time”, Philosophia, Yearbook of the Research Center for Greek Philosophy at the Academy of ... Tzamalikos, P., Origen, Cosmology and Ontology of Time, Leiden / Boston, 2006.

Anaxagoras  Origen  and Neoplatonism

Origen has been always studied as a theologian and too much credit has been given to Eusebius’ implausible hagiography of him. This book explores who Origen really was, by pondering into his philosophical background, which determines his theological exposition implicitly, yet decisively. For this background to come to light, it took a ground-breaking exposition of Anaxagoras’ philosophy and its legacy to Classical and Late Antiquity (Plato, Aristotle, Stoics, Origen, Neoplatonism), assessing critically Aristotle’s distorted representation of Anaxagoras. Origen, formerly a Greek philosopher of note, whom Proclus styled an anti-Platonist, is placed in the history of philosophy for the first time. By drawing on his Anaxagorean background, and being the first to revive the Anaxagorean Theory of Logoi, he paved the way to Nicaea. He was an anti-Platonist because he was an Anaxagorean philosopher with far-reaching influence, also on Neoplatonists such as Porphyry. His theology made an impact not only on the Cappadocians, but also on later Christian authors. His theory of the soul, now expounded in the light of his philosophical background, turns out more orthodox than that of some Christian stars of the Byzantine imperial orthodoxy.

Christian and Islamic Philosophies of Time

tian Neoplatonic models that see transient time as the projection of a created realm of perpetuity.2 1. ... 4 Panagiotis Tzamalikos, Origen: Cosmology and Ontology of Time, Supplements to Vigiliae Christianae 77 (Leiden: Brill, 2006), ...

Christian and Islamic Philosophies of Time

This volume constitutes an attempt at bringing together philosophies of time—or more precisely, philosophies on time and, in a concomitant way, history—emerging from Christianity’s and Islam’s intellectual histories. Starting from the Neoplatonic heritage and the voice of classical philosophy, the volume enters the Byzantine and Arabic intellectual worlds up to Ibn Al-Arabi’s times. A conscious choice in this volume is not to engage with, perhaps, the most prominent figures of Christian and Arabic philosophy, i.e., Augustine on the one hand and Avicenna/Ibn Sina on the other, precisely because these have attracted so much attention due to their prominence in their respective traditions—and beyond. In a certain way, Maximus the Confessor and Ibn Al-Arabi—together with Al-Fārābi—emerge as alternative representatives of their two traditions in this volume, offering two axes for this endeavor. The synthesis of those approaches on time and history, their comparison rather than their mere co-existence, is left to the reader’s critical inquiry and philosophical investigation.

Journey Back to God

At issue here is Origen's ontology of time, which is not always clear or precisely defined.58 Misconception of Pre-Existence as Platonic Many scholars, both ancient and modern, dismiss Origen's cosmology in general and his theory of ...

Journey Back to God

Journey Back to God explores Origen of Alexandria's creative, complex, and controversial treatment of the problem of evil. It argues that his layered cosmology functions as a theodicy that deciphers deeper meaning beneath cosmic disparity. Origen asks: why does God create a world where some suffer more than others? On the surface, the unfair arrangement of the world defies theological coherence. In order to defend divine justice against the charge of cosmic mismanagement, Origen develops a theological cosmology that explains the ontological status and origin of evil as well as its cosmic implications. Origen's theodicy hinges on the journey of the soul back to God. Its themes correlate with the soul's creation, fall and descent into materiality, gradual purification, and eventual divinization. The world, for Origen, functions as a school and hospital for the soul where it undergoes the necessary education and purgation. Origen carefully calibrates his cosmology and theology. He portrays God as a compassionate and judicious teacher, physician, and father who employs suffering for our amelioration. Journey Back to God frames the systematic study of Origen's theodicy within a broader theory of theodicy as navigation, which signifies the dynamic process whereby we impute meaning to suffering. It unites the logical and spiritual facets of his theodicy, and situates it in its third-century historical, theological, and philosophical context, correcting the distortions that continue to plague Origen scholarship. Furthermore, the study clarifies his ambiguous position on universalism within the context of his eschatology. Finally, it assesses the cogency and contemporary relevance of Origen's theodicy, highlighting the problems and prospects of his bold, constructive, and optimistic vision.

Divine Perfection and Human Potentiality

Origen's removal of the argument from issues of time and eternity safeguards against an interpretation that places an interval of ... See discussion in P. Tzamalikos, Origen: Cosmology and Ontology of Time (Leiden: Brill, 2006), 32. 52.

Divine Perfection and Human Potentiality

The place of Hilary of Poitiers in the debates and developments of early Christianity is tenuous in contemporary scholarship. His invaluable historical position is unquestioned, but the coherence and significance of his own thought is less certain. In this book, Jarred A. Mercer makes a case for understanding Hilary not only as an important historical figure, but as a noteworthy and independent thinker. Divine Perfection and Human Potentiality offers a new paradigm for understanding Hilary's work De Trinitate. The book contends that in all of Hilary's polemical and constructive argumentation, which is essentially trinitarian, he is inherently developing an anthropology. The work therefore reinterprets Hilary's overall theological project in terms of the continual, and for him necessary, anthropological corollary of trinitarian theology- to reframe it in terms of a "trinitarian anthropology." The coherence of Hilary's work depends upon this framework, and without it his thought continues to elude his readers. Mercer demonstrates this through following Hilary's main lines of trinitarian argument, out of which flow his anthropological vision. These trinitarian arguments unfold into a progressive picture of humanity from potentiality to perfection.

A Newly Discovered Greek Father

Cf. P. Tzamalikos, The Concept of Time in Origen, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Glasgow, 1986, later published by Peter Lang, Bern/Frankfurt/Paris/New York/London/ Wien/Berlin, 1991. Also, Origen: Cosmology and Ontology of Time, Brill, ...

A Newly Discovered Greek Father

A critical edition an ancient manuscript, which has resulted in discovery of Cassian the Sabaite, whom Medieval forgery extinguished, by attributing heavily interpolated Latin translations of this Greek original to a figment called ‘John Cassian’. This erudite Sabaite intellectual is Pseudo-Caesarius and the author of Pseudo Didymus' De Trinitate.

Jewish Roots of Eastern Christian Mysticism

19 See, for example, Panayiotis Tzamalikos, Origen: Cosmology and Ontology of Time, SVC 77 (Leiden; Brill, 2006); idem, Origen: Philosophy of History & Eschatology, SVC 85 (Leiden: Brill, 2007). 20 For an attempt to bring ...

Jewish Roots of Eastern Christian Mysticism

Jewish Roots of Eastern Christian Mysticism explores influences of Jewish apocalypticism and mysticism on the development of Eastern Christian theology, demonstrating that recent studies of apocalyptic literature, the Qumran Scrolls, Gnosticism, and later Jewish mysticism throw new and welcome light on the sources and continuities of Orthodox spirituality and liturgy.

The Real Cassian Revisited

Following the discovery of a new Greek Father, namely, Cassian the Sabaite, who, by means of Medieval forgery, has been heretofore eclipsed by a figment known as ‘John Cassian of Marseilles’, this book casts new light on the Late ...

The Real Cassian Revisited

Following the discovery of a new Greek Father, namely, Cassian the Sabaite, who, by means of Medieval forgery, has been heretofore eclipsed by a figment known as ‘John Cassian of Marseilles’, this book casts new light on the Late Antique interplay between Hellenism and Christianity, sixth century Origenism, and Christian influence upon Neoplatonism.

Origen and Scripture

18 At several junctures in On First Principles Origen revisits his answer to this question by excluding the possibility that ... creation does not refer to the creation of any individual person” (Origen: Cosmology and Ontology of Time ...

Origen and Scripture

This book examines Origen of Alexandria's approach to the Bible through a biographical lens, focusing on his account of the scriptural interpreter. Martens explores the many ways in which Origen thought ideal scriptural interpreters (himself included) embarked upon a way of salvation, culminating in the everlasting contemplation of God.

Origen s Revenge

Origen: Cosmology and Ontology of Time. Leiden: Brill, 2006. Veyne, Paul. “La famille et l'amour sous le Haut-Empire romain.” Annales, E.S.C. 33 (1978) 35–63. Wang, Robin R. Yinyang: The Way of Heaven and Earth in Chinese Thought and ...

Origen s Revenge

Is the difference of male and female to be “completely shaken off” so that men and women are no longer men and women but merely human beings? The great seventh-century saint Maximus the Confessor said yes, but such thinking is difficult if not impossible to reconcile with much else in Christian tradition that obliges men and women to live as either men or women. Origen’s Revenge contrasts the two main sources of early Christian thinking on male and female: the generally negative view of Greek philosophy, limiting sexual distinction to the body and holding the body in low regard, and the much more positive view of Hebrew Scripture, in which sexual distinction and reproduction are both deemed naturally good and necessary for human existence. These two views account for much of the controversy in early Christianity concerning marriage and monasticism. They also still contribute to current controversies over sex roles, gender identity, and sexual ethics. Origen’s Revenge also develops the more Hebrew line of early Christian thought to propose a new understanding of male and female with a firmer grounding in scripture, tradition, theology, and philosophy and with profound implications for all human relationships, whether social, political, or spiritual.

An Ancient Commentary on the Book of Revelation

... P. 'Origen and the Stoic view of time', Journal of the History of Ideas 52 (1991) 535–561 Tzamalikos, P. Origen: Cosmology and Ontology of Time, Leiden, 2006 Tzamalikos, P. 'Origen, the source of Augustine's theory of time', ...

An Ancient Commentary on the Book of Revelation

This is a new critical edition, with translation and commentary, of the Scholia in Apocalypsin, which were falsely attributed to Origen a century ago. They include extensive sections from Didymus the Blind's lost Commentary on the Apocalypse (fourth century) and therefore counter the current belief that Oecumenius' commentary (sixth century) was the most ancient. Professor Tzamalikos argues that their author was in fact Cassian the Sabaite, an erudite monk and abbot at the monastery of Sabas, the Great Laura, in Palestine. He was different from the alleged Latin author John Cassian, placed a century or so before the real Cassian. The Scholia attest to the tension between the imperial Christian orthodoxy of the sixth century and certain monastic circles, who drew freely on Hellenic ideas and on alleged 'heretics'. They show that, during that period, Hellenism was a vigorous force inspiring not only pagan intellectuals, but also influential Christian quarters.

The Philosophy of Early Christianity

On Origen's cosmology see P. Tzamalikos, Origen: Cosmology and Ontology of Time (Leiden: Brill, 2006) (Suppl. to VC 77) and more recently G. Boys-Stones, “Time, Creation, and the Mind of God: The Afterlife of a Platonist Theory in ...

The Philosophy of Early Christianity

First published in 2014. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Origen

Origen's Commentaries on the Old Testament.” In The Oxford Handbook of Origen, edited by Ronald E. Heine and Karen Jo Torjesen. ... Tzamalikos, P. Origen: Cosmology and Ontology of Time. Leiden: Brill, 2006. ———.

Origen

The late second and early third century was a turbulent time in the Roman Empire and in the relationship between the empire and the church. Origen was the son of a Christian martyr and was himself imprisoned and tortured in his late life in a persecution that targeted leaders of the church. Deeply pious and a gifted scholar, Origen stands as one of the most influential Christian teachers in church history, and also one of the most controversial. This introduction to Origen begins by looking at some of the circumstances that were formative influences on his life. It then turns to some key elements in his thought. The approach here differs from that taken by most earlier studies by working from the central position that Scripture had for Origen. Heine argues that Origen’s thought, in his later life especially, reflects his continual interaction with the Bible.

The Seventh Book of the Stromateis

These aeons, in Origen's view, provide rational creatures with the necessary opportunities and time to improve morally, ... (London: T&T Clark, 2008), 210–221; Panayiotis Tzamalikos,Origen: Cosmology and Ontology of Time(VChr Suppl.

The Seventh Book of the Stromateis

This volume comprises 16 studies focused on the last extant part of Clement's 'Stromateis'. Written by specialists from seven countries, it is a compendium of contemporary scholarship dealing with major aspects of Clement's thought in general.

Shapers of Christian Orthodoxy

Rankin, David, From Clement to Origen: The Social and Historical Context of the Church Fathers (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2006). ... Tzamalikos, Panayiotis, Origen: Cosmology and Ontology of Time (Leiden: Brill, 2007).

Shapers of Christian Orthodoxy

"The purpose of this volume is threefold: to introduce a selection of key early and medieval theologians, to strengthen the faith of evangelical Christians by helping them to understand the riches of the church's theological reflection, and to help them learn how to think theologically"--From publisher description.

Resurrection as Salvation

Origen describes this transformation in moral terms: the love of the mind grows cold because iniquity has ... Panayiotis Tzamalikos, Origen: Cosmology and Ontology of Time, Supplements to Vigiliae Christianae 77 (Leiden: Brill, 2006), ...

Resurrection as Salvation

This book is the first study to focus on the reception of Paul's link between resurrection and salvation, revealing its profound effect on Early Christian theology - not only eschatology, but also anthropology, pneumatology, ethics, and soteriology. Thomas D. McGlothlin traces the roots of the deep tension on the matter in ancient Judaism and then offers deep readings of the topic by key theologians of pre-Nicene Christianity, who argued on both sides of the issue of the fleshliness of the resurrected body. McGlothlin unravels the surprising continuities that emerge between Irenaeus, Origen, and the Valentinians, as well as deep disagreements between allies like Irenaeus and Tertullian.

A Cloud of Witnesses

It is unique, it occurred only once, but it is effective for all times and all creatures. ... the apokatastasis in Origen's thought see P. Tzamalikos, Origen: Cosmology and Ontology of Time (VCS, 77; Leiden: Brill, 2006), pp.

A Cloud of Witnesses

The book of Hebrews has often been the Cinderella of the New Testament, overlooked and marginalized; and yet it is one of the most interesting and theologically significant books in the New Testament. A Cloud of Witness examines the theology of the book in the light of its ancient historical context. There are chapters devoted to the structure of Hebrews, the person of Jesus Christ, Hebrews within the context of Second Temple Judaism and the Greco-Roman empire and the role of Hebrews in early Christian thought.