The Doctrine of Original Sin

According to Scripture, Reason, and Experience, in Answer to Dr. Taylor

The Doctrine of Original Sin


ORIGINAL SIN

ORIGINAL SIN

THE following discourse is intended, not merely as an answer to any particular book written against the doctrine of Original Sin, but as a general defense of that great important doctrine. Nevertheless, I have in this defense taken notice of the main things said against this doctrine, by such of the more noted opposers of it as I have had opportunity to read: particularly those two late writers, Dr. Turnbull and Dr. Taylor, of Norwich; but especially the latter, in what he has published in those two books of his, the first entitled, The Scripture-Doctrine of Original Sin proposed to free and candid Examination; the other, his Key to the Apostolic Writings

Original Sin

Origins, Developments, Contemporary Meanings

Original Sin

"Original Sin: Origins, Developments, Contemporary Meanings is the first full-scale assessment in many decades of one of the most fundamental of theological doctrines. Theologian Tatha Wiley methodically traces the emergence and initial function of the doctrine of Original Sin, then follows its rich development through the patristic and medieval centuries, and pays particular attention to modern ideas that have made this influential doctrine so problematic for contemporary believers. She not only highlights how and why recent theologians from Niebuhr to Ruether have sought to retrieve and rethink the doctrine, but also addresses an important question: "What does the doctrine of Original Sin have to say to us today?""--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Original Sin

Original Sin

Luc Cain was born and raised in Hell, but he isn't feeling as demonic as usual lately—thanks to Frannie Cavanaugh and the unique power she never realized she had. But you can't desert Hell without consequences, and suddenly Frannie and Luc find themselves targeted by the same demons who used to be Luc's allies. Left with few options, Frannie and Luc accept the protection of Heaven and one of its most powerful angels, Gabe. Unfortunately, Luc isn't the only one affected by Frannie, and it isn't long before Gabe realizes that being around her is too...tempting. Rather than risk losing his wings, he leaves Frannie and Luc under the protection of her recently-acquired guardian angel. Which would be fine, but Gabe is barely out the door before an assortment of demons appears—and they're not leaving without dragging Luc back to Hell with them. Hell won't give up and Heaven won't give in. Frannie's guardian exercises all the power he has to keep them away, but the demons are willing to hurt anyone close to Frannie in order to get what they want. It will take everything she has and then some to stay out of Hell's grasp. And not everyone will get out of it alive. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

"Original Sin"?

Revising the Revisionist Critique of the 1963 Operation Coldstore in Singapore

“Revisionist” or “alternative” historians have increasingly questioned elements of the Singapore Story — the master narrative of the nation’s political and socioeconomic development since its founding by the British in 1819. Much criticism focuses especially on one defining episode of the Story: the internal security dragnet mounted on 2 February 1963 against Communist United Front elements on the island, known to posterity as Operation Coldstore. The revisionists claim that Coldstore was mounted for political rather than security reasons and actually destroyed a legitimate Progressive Left opposition — personalized by the charismatic figure of Lim Chin Siong — rather than a dangerous Communist network as the conventional wisdom holds. Relying on both declassified and some previously unseen classified sources, this book challenges revisionist claims, reiterating the historic importance of Coldstore in helping pave the way for Singapore’s remarkable journey from Third World status to First in a single generation.

Original Sin

A Cultural History

Original Sin

Essayist and biographer Alan Jacobs introduces us to the world of original sin, which he describes as not only a profound idea but a necessary one. As G. K. Chesterton explains, "Only with original sin can we at once pity the beggar and distrust the king." Do we arrive in this world predisposed to evil? St. Augustine passionately argued that we do; his opponents thought the notion was an insult to a good God. Ever since Augustine, the church has taught the doctrine of original sin, which is the idea that we are not born innocent, but as babes we are corrupt, guilty, and worthy of condemnation. Thus started a debate that has raged for centuries and done much to shape Western civilization. Perhaps no Christian doctrine is more controversial; perhaps none is more consequential. Blaise Pascal claimed that "but for this mystery, the most incomprehensible of all, we remain incomprehensible to ourselves." Chesterton affirmed it as the only provable Christian doctrine. Modern scholars assail the idea as baleful and pernicious. But whether or not we believe in original sin, the idea has shaped our most fundamental institutions—our political structures, how we teach and raise our young, and, perhaps most pervasively of all, how we understand ourselves. In Original Sin, Alan Jacobs takes readers on a sweeping tour of the idea of original sin, its origins, its history, and its proponents and opponents. And he leaves us better prepared to answer one of the most important questions of all: Are we really, all of us, bad to the bone?

Original Sin and Everyday Protestants

Original Sin and Everyday Protestants

In the years following World War II, American Protestantism experienced tremendous growth, but conventional wisdom holds that midcentury Protestants practiced an optimistic, progressive, complacent, and materialist faith. In Original Sin and Everyday Protestants, historian Andrew Finstuen argues against this prevailing view, showing that theological issues in general--and the ancient Christian doctrine of original sin in particular--became newly important to both the culture at large and to a generation of American Protestants during a postwar ''age of anxiety'' as the Cold War took root. Finstuen focuses on three giants of Protestant thought--Billy Graham, Reinhold Niebuhr, and Paul Tillich--men who were among the era's best known public figures. He argues that each thinker's strong commitment to the doctrine of original sin was a powerful element of the broad public influence that they enjoyed. Drawing on extensive correspondence from everyday Protestants, the book captures the voices of the people in the pews, revealing that the ordinary, rank-and-file Protestants were indeed thinking about Christian doctrine and especially about ''good'' and ''evil'' in human nature. Finstuen concludes that the theological concerns of ordinary American Christians were generally more complicated and serious than is commonly assumed, correcting the view that postwar American culture was becoming more and more secular from the late 1940s through the 1950s.

The Doctrines of Original Sin and the Trinity

Discussed in a Correspondence Between a Clergyman of the Episcopal Church, in England and a Layman of Boston, U.S.

The Doctrines of Original Sin and the Trinity


Original Sin

Original Sin

Guilty Love? When Christian Malraux told Emily, "You will be my sex slave," she should have turned tail and run! Instead, she found herself falling in love. But loving Christian wasn't easy, even though he made it clear that he desired Emily. For there was a dark and mysterious secret in Christian's past that had scarred his soul as well as his face. Emily hoped that the power of her love would bring him out of the darkness and into the light again. But would Christian ever see her as anything more than an object of desire…who conveniently happened to work for him?

Original Sin

Original Sin

In the action-packed thriller Original Sin, a powerful and secret society of religious zealots have one mission to cleanse the world of impurity. The group hires a female assassin to seek out and viciously purify adulterous married men. Brandy's hunting ground is none other than an adult online chat room. Brandy has no patience for the liars and cheaters who sin as adulterers. After the men display their true intentions in the chat room with her, she realizes they are deserving of everything she is going to do to them. When Brandy's first victim is found in a ramshackle motel room filleted by a butcher knife with the word sinner crudely written in blood on his forehead, newly-promoted Chicago police detective Dallas Holden is called in to supervise the homicide investigation. As the case progresses, Dallas enters the fascinating and highly seductive realm of online chatting in order to find the killer. Danger mounts as Holden finds himself entangled in an intricate web of love, betrayal, and power that inevitably leads to a confrontation with a trusted ally and the leader of the secret religious society a showdown that will change Dallas Holden's life forever.