Oxford Latin Course

Oxford Latin Course

This second edition of the Oxford Latin Course combines the best features of both modern and traditional methods of Latin teaching from first stages to GCSE. Completely revised and restructured in the light of a nationwide survey of Classics teachers, it provides an exciting, stimulatingapproach to Latin based on the reading of original texts. Parts I-III are built around a narrative detailing the life of Horace, based closely on historical sources, which helps students to develop an understanding of the times of Cicero and Augustus.

Oxford Latin Reader

Oxford Latin Reader

Used along side any Latin course, the Oxford Latin Reader will give students access to, and confidence with, a broad range of unadapted Latin texts. Helps make the transition from adapted Latin to unadapted texts Extracts are of a manageable length and a glossary of difficult vocabulary and usages aid students to approach the texts with confidence A historical timeline matches major events with the featured authors' lives The Teacher's Book provides full translations to save time as well as suggested questions and additional background information

The Well-Trained Mind: A Guide to Classical Education at Home (Third Edition)

The Well-Trained Mind: A Guide to Classical Education at Home (Third Edition)

A new edition of a forefront home-schooling reference shares step-by-step recommendations for providing a child with an academically rigorous, comprehensive education from preschool through high school, in a guide that incorporates updated resource listings, contact information, and Internet links. 20,000 first printing.

Oxford Latin Course

Oxford Latin Course

Designed for North American students, this special version of the Oxford Latin Course combines the best features of both modern and traditional methods of Latin teaching, providing an exciting, stimulating introduction and approach to Latin based on the reading of original texts.In this four-volume North American edition, the order of declensions corresponds to customary U.S. usage, and the spelling has been Americanized. In addition, it offers full-color illustrations and photographs throughout Parts I and II and an expanded Teacher's Book with translations for each part. Parts I-III (now available in hardcover editions) are built around a narrative detailing the life of Horace, now based more closely on historical sources, which helps students to get to know real Romans--with their daily activities, concerns, and habits--and to develop an understanding of Roman civilization during the time of Cicero and Augustus. Part IV (paperback) is a reader consisting of extracts from Caesar, Cicero, Catullus, Virgil, Livy, and Ovid.The second edition of the Oxford Latin Course has been carefully designed to maximize student interest, understanding, and competence. It features a clearer presentation of grammar, revised narrative passages, new background sections, more emphasis on daily life and on the role of women, a greater number and variety of exercises, and review chapters and tests. Each chapter opens with a set of cartoons with Latin captions that illustrate new grammar points. A Latin reading follows, with new vocabulary highlighted in the margins and follow-up exercises that focus on reading comprehension and grammatical analysis. A background essay in English concludes each chapter. Covering a variety of topics--from history to food, from slavery to travel, these engaging essays present a well-rounded picture of Augustan Rome.The Oxford Latin Course, Second Edition offers today's students and teachers an exceptionally engaging and attractive introduction to the language, literature, and culture of Rome--one that builds skills effectively and is exciting to use.

JACT Review

JACT Review


JACT Bulletin

JACT Bulletin


The Oxford Handbook of Medieval Latin Literature

The Oxford Handbook of Medieval Latin Literature

The twenty-eight essays in this Handbook represent the best of current thinking in the study of Latin language and literature in the Middle Ages. The insights offered by the collective of authors not only illuminate the field of medieval Latin literature but shed new light on broader questions of literary history, cultural interaction, world literature, and language in history and society. The contributors to this volume--a collection of both senior scholars and gifted young thinkers--vividly illustrate the field's complexities on a wide range of topics through carefully chosen examples and challenges to settled answers of the past. At the same time, they suggest future possibilities for the necessarily provisional and open-ended work essential to the pursuit of medieval Latin studies. While advanced specialists will find much here to engage and at times to provoke them, this handbook successfully orients non-specialists and students to this thriving field of study. The overall approach of The Oxford Handbook of Medieval Latin Literature makes this volume an essential resource for students of the ancient world interested in the prolonged after-life of the classical period's cultural complexes, for medieval historians, for scholars of other medieval literary traditions, and for all those interested in delving more deeply into the fascinating more-than-millennium that forms the bridge between the ancient Mediterranean world and what we consider modernity.

The Oxford Handbook of Neo-Latin

The Oxford Handbook of Neo-Latin

From the dawn of the early modern period around 1400 until the eighteenth century, Latin was still the European language and its influence extended as far as Asia and the Americas. At the same time, the production of Latin writing exploded thanks to book printing and new literary and cultural dynamics. Latin also entered into a complex interplay with the rising vernacular languages. This Handbook gives an accessible survey of the main genres, contexts, and regions of Neo-Latin, as we have come to call Latin writing composed in the wake of Petrarch (1304-74). Its emphasis is on the period of Neo-Latin's greatest cultural relevance, from the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries. Its chapters, written by specialists in the field, present individual methodologies and focuses while retaining an introductory character. The Handbook will be valuable to all readers wanting to orientate themselves in the immense ocean of Neo-Latin literature and culture. It will be particularly helpful for those working on early modern languages and literatures as well as to classicists working on the culture of ancient Rome, its early modern reception and the shifting characteristics of post-classical Latin language and literature. Political, social, cultural and intellectual historians will find much relevant material in the Handbook, and it will provide a rich range of material to scholars researching the history of their respective geographical areas of interest.

The Oxford History of the Irish Book, Volume III

The Irish Book in English, 1550-1800

The Oxford History of the Irish Book, Volume III

The Oxford History of the Irish Book is a major new series that charts the development of the book in Ireland from its origins within an early medieval manuscript culture to its current incarnation alongside the rise of digital media in the twenty-first century. Volume III: The Irish Book in English, 1550-1800 contains a series of groundbreaking essays that seek to explain the fortunes of printed word from the early Renaissance to the end of the eighteenth century. The essays in section one explain the development of print culture in the period, from its first incarnation in the small area of the English Pale around Dublin, dominated by the interests of the English authorities, to the more widespread dispersal of the printing press at the close of the eighteenth century, when provincial presses developed their own character and style either alongside or as a challenge to the dominant intellectual culture. Section two explains the crucial developments in the structure and technical innovation of the print trade; the role played by private and public collections of books; and the evidence of changing reading practices throughout the period. The third and longest section explores the impact of the rise of print. Essays examine the effect that the printed book had on religious and political life in Ireland, providing a case study of the impact of the French Revolution on pamphlets and propaganda in Ireland; the transformations illustrated in the history of historical writing, as well as in literature and the theatre, through the publication of play texts for a wide audience. Others explore the impact that print had on the history of science and the production of foreign language books. The volume concludes with an authoritative bibliographical essay outlining the sources that exist for the study of the book in early modern Ireland. This is an authoritative volume with essays by key scholars that will be the standard guide for many years to come.