The Palaeolithic Societies of Europe

Clive Gamble's overview of Palaeolithic societies, building on his The Palaeolithic Settlement of Europe (1986).

The Palaeolithic Societies of Europe

Clive Gamble's overview of Palaeolithic societies, building on his The Palaeolithic Settlement of Europe (1986).

Palaeolithic Europe

Palaeolithic Europe


The Palaeolithic Settlement of Europe

A major survey of the prehistoric hunter-gatherer societies of Europe, this book reviews the topical information and interpretations for scientific research.

The Palaeolithic Settlement of Europe

A major survey of the prehistoric hunter-gatherer societies of Europe, this book reviews the topical information and interpretations for scientific research. Palaeolithic studies are at an exciting point of transition. The explosion in ethno-archaeological studies has fundamentally challenged our models and interpretations amongst all classes of data and at all spatial scales of analysis. Furthermore the traditional concerns of dating and quaternary studies have also passed through their own revolutions and palaeolithic archaeology is the direct beneficiary. Dr Gamble presents in an imaginative but comprehensive framework our changing perspectives of Europe's oldest societies.

Palaeolithic Europe

Palaeolithic Europe


Prehistoric Europe

While it is an arbitrary boundary in terms of both human adaptations and technology, the date of 10000 bp and the beginning of the post-glacial period mark an end to palaeolithic Europe. GeographicalVariation The most striking feature ...

Prehistoric Europe

The study of European prehistory has been revolutionized in recent years by the rapid growth rate of archeological discovery, advances in dating methods and the application of scientific techniques to archaeological material and new archaeological aims and frameworks of interpretation. Whereas previous work concentrated on the recovery and description of material remains, the main focus is now on the reconstruction of prehistoric societies and the explanation of their development. This volume provides that elementary and comprehensive synthesis of the new discoveries and the new interpretations of European prehistory. After and introductory chapter on the geographical setting and the development of prehistoric studies in Europe, the text is divided chronologically into nine chapters. Each one describes, with numerous maps, plans and drawings, the relevant archaeological data, and proceeds to a discussion of the societies they represent. Particular attention is paid to the major themes of recent prehistoric research, especially subsistence economy, trade, settlement, technology and social organization.

The Middle Palaeolithic Occupation of Europe

This volume focuses on the evidence from the Middle Paleolithic, assessing it in its own right rather than looking at it for signs of the development of 'modern humans' as they become recognisable in the subsequent Upper Paleolithic period.

The Middle Palaeolithic Occupation of Europe

This volume focuses on the evidence from the Middle Paleolithic, assessing it in its own right rather than looking at it for signs of the development of 'modern humans' as they become recognisable in the subsequent Upper Paleolithic period. It provides useful regional reviews of the evidence from different regions of Europe. It is the second of three volumes on the phases of the Paleololithic being sponsored by the European Science Foundation. (The first was the Earliest Occupation of Europe - ed. W. Roebroeks, Leiden 1995). Contents: The Middle Paleololithic - a point of inflection (Clive Gamble and Wil Roebroeks); Environments and settlements in the Iberian peninsula (Luis Gerardo Vega Toscano, Luis Raposa and Manuel Santojana); The Neanderthals in Italy (M Mussi); Environment and adaptations in Eastern central Europe (Jiri Svorboda); The Middle Palaeolithic of Quercy (J Jaubert); The Middle Paleolithic of the Aquitaine Basin (Alain Turq); The Northwest European Middle Paleolithic (Wil Roebroeks and Alain Tuffreau); Hominids without homes - The Nature of Middle Palaeolithic settlement in Europe (J Kolen); Surface scatters from Southern Limburg, the Netherlands (Jan Kolen et al); Raw Material Transport Patterns (J Feblot-Augustins); The Faunal Record of the Lower and Middle Palaeolithic of Europe (S Gaudzinski). "

Palaeolithic Europe

A Summary of Some Important Finds with Special Reference to Central Europe D. K. Bhattacharya ... States of America by Humanities Press Inc. Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data Bhattacharya , D K Palaeolithic Europe .

Palaeolithic Europe


Palaeolithic Europe

In this book, Jennifer French presents a new synthesis of the archaeological, palaeoanthropological, and palaeogenetic records of the European Palaeolithic, adopting a unique demographic perspective on these first two-million years of ...

Palaeolithic Europe

In this book, Jennifer French presents a new synthesis of the archaeological, palaeoanthropological, and palaeogenetic records of the European Palaeolithic, adopting a unique demographic perspective on these first two-million years of European prehistory. Unlike prevailing narratives of demographic stasis, she emphasises the dynamism of Palaeolithic populations of both our evolutionary ancestors and members of our own species across four demographic stages, within a context of substantial Pleistocene climatic changes. Integrating evolutionary theory with a socially oriented approach to the Palaeolithic, French bridges biological and cultural factors, with a focus on women and children as the drivers of population change. She shows how, within the physiological constraints on fertility and mortality, social relationships provide the key to enduring demographic success. Through its demographic focus, French combines a 'big picture' perspective on human evolution with careful analysis of the day-to-day realities of European Palaeolithic hunter-gatherer communities-their families, their children, and their lives.

Mind Over Matter

Mind Over Matter


The Body in History

This book is a long-term history of how the human body has been understood in Europe from the Palaeolithic to the present day, focusing on specific moments of change.

The Body in History

This book is a long-term history of how the human body has been understood in Europe from the Palaeolithic to the present day, focusing on specific moments of change. Developing a multi-scalar approach to the past, and drawing on the work of an interdisciplinary team of experts, the authors examine how the body has been treated in life, art and death for the last 40,000 years. Key case-study chapters examine Palaeolithic, Neolithic, Bronze Age, Classical, Medieval, Early Modern and Modern bodies. What emerges is not merely a history of different understandings of the body, but a history of the different human bodies that have existed. Furthermore, the book argues, these bodies are not merely the product of historical circumstance, but are themselves key elements in shaping the changes that have swept across Europe since the arrival of modern humans.

Painted Caves

Written from an archaeological perspective, Painted Caves is a beautifully illustrated introduction to the oldest art of Western Europe: the very ancient paintings found in caves.

Painted Caves

Written from an archaeological perspective, Painted Caves is a beautifully illustrated introduction to the oldest art of Western Europe: the very ancient paintings found in caves. Lawson offers an up to date overview of the geographical distribution of the sites and their significance within the varied network of Palaeolithic art.

Relational Cohesion in Palaeolithic Europe

This book examines how human interactions with animals, in particular now extinct cave bears (Ursus spelaeu), affected the social lives of prehistoric hunter-gatherers (hominins - Neanderthals and AMH) living in Central Europe (Moravia and ...

Relational Cohesion in Palaeolithic Europe

This book examines how human interactions with animals, in particular now extinct cave bears (Ursus spelaeu), affected the social lives of prehistoric hunter-gatherers (hominins - Neanderthals and AMH) living in Central Europe (Moravia and Silesia/Eastern Czech Republic) during OIS3 (c. 60,000-24,000 Cal. BP). The author adopts a multidisciplinary approach, using published literature, animal remains, digital data, and GIS, together with odontometric and tooth-wear analyses, and spatial reconstruction techniques to identify potential interactions between hominins and cave bears. New theoretical concepts are used to interpret the results and as a means for making statements about the role that cave bears, and potential interactions with cave bears, played in the social lives of hominins. After the introduction Chapter 2 explores what interactions are, discusses and highlights the main issues associated with human-animal interactions, and outlines the approaches adopted. Chapter 3 presents an overview of cave bears, discussing issues such as the history of cave-bear research, cave-bear phylogeny, evidence for their presence, their geographical and chronological distribution, important elements of their ecology, biology, physiology, and ethology, and existing evidence for human use of their remains and cave-bear depictions. Chapter 4 presents a thorough overview of the case study, looking in particular at issues such as climate, geology, topography, flora, and fauna, hominins and cave bears in the study region, and the specific case study sites chosen for this book. Chapter 5 creates a digital framework, mapping site locations, lithic raw material outcrops, topography, palaeohydrology, palaeovegetation, friction maps, prey species distribution and diversity maps. Chapters 6 and 7 map cave-bear and hominin distribution patterns, and Chapter 8 brings the results of Chapters 6 and 7 together, identifying potential interactions between the two. In the final chapter the author discuss the significance of the results of the book both in terms of hominins and cave bears within the study region during OIS3, and within a wider zoological, spatial and temporal context.

Learning Among Neanderthals and Palaeolithic Modern Humans

Considering the expansion process of the human population, it is worth noting that the population density of AMHs invading temperate Europe may be lower than that in the tropical and subtropical latitudes in Africa at that time.

Learning Among Neanderthals and Palaeolithic Modern Humans

This book is based on the research performed for the Replacement of Neanderthals by Modern Humans Project. The central issue of the project is the investigation of possible differences between the two populations in cognitive ability for learning. The project aims to evaluate a unique working hypothesis, coined as the learning hypothesis, which postulates that differences in learning eventually resulted in the replacement of those populations. The book deals with relevant archaeological records to understand the learning behaviours of Neanderthals and modern humans. Learning behaviours are conditioned by numerous factors including not only cognitive ability but also cultural traditions, social structure, population size, and life history. The book addresses the issues in two parts, comparing learning behaviours in terms of cognitive ability and social environments, respectively. Collectively, it provides new insights into the behavioural characteristics of Neanderthals and modern humans from a previously overlooked perspective. Furthermore, it highlights the significance of understanding learning in prehistory, the driving force for any development of culture and technology among human society.

Wild Things

This volume celebrates this trend by focusing on recent advances in the study of the Palaeolithic and Mesolithic.

Wild Things

Recently, Palaeolithic and Mesolithic archaeology has been breaking boundaries worldwide. Finds such as the Mesolithic house at Howick, the sequencing of the Neanderthal genome, and the recently discovered footprints at Happisburgh all serve to indicate how archaeologists in these fields are truly at the cutting edge of understanding humanityÍs past. This volume celebrates this trend by focusing on recent advances in the study of the Palaeolithic and Mesolithic. With contributors from a diverse range of backgrounds, it allows for a greater degree of interdisciplinary discourse than is often the case, as the Palaeolithic and Mesolithic are generally split apart. Wild Things brings together contributions from major researchers and early career specialists, detailing research taking place across the British Isles, France, Portugal, Russia, the Levant and Europe as a whole, providing a cross-section of the exciting range of research being conducted. By combining papers from both these periods, it is hoped that dialogue between practitioners of Palaeolithic and Mesolithic archaeology can be further encouraged. Topics include: the chronology of the Mid-Upper Palaeolithic of European Russia; territorial use of Alpine high altitude areas by Mesolithic hunter-gatherer; discussing the feasibility of reconstructing Neanderthal demography to examine their extinction; the funerary contexts from the Mesolithic burials at Muge; the discovery of further British Upper Palaeolithic parietal art at Cathole Cave; exploitation of both lithics and fauna in Palaeolithic France; and an analysis of Mesolithic/Neolithic trade in Europe.

The Middle Palaeolithic Leaf Points of Europe

An investigation of the relations between heterogeneity in the material world and variations in human behaviour, particularly landscape settlement and stone tool fabrication, in the European Lower and Middle Palaeolithic.

The Middle Palaeolithic Leaf Points of Europe

An investigation of the relations between heterogeneity in the material world and variations in human behaviour, particularly landscape settlement and stone tool fabrication, in the European Lower and Middle Palaeolithic. A theoretical approach termed ecological geography is developed. This approach is applied to the Middle leaf point industries of Europe, and in particular the Middle Palaeolithic of the Altmuhl Valley in Bavaria.

Learning Strategies and Cultural Evolution during the Palaeolithic

8.2.5 Discussion and Extensions of Simulated Model This study does not support the hypothesis that Aurignacian populations in Early Upper Palaeolithic Europe were ethnically structured in a manner related to ornamental material culture.

Learning Strategies and Cultural Evolution during the Palaeolithic

This volume is motivated by the desire to explain why Neanderthals were replaced by modern humans, in terms of cultural differences between the two (sub-) species. It provides up-to-date coverage on the theory of cultural evolution as is being used by anthropologists, archaeologists, biologists and psychologists to decipher hominin cultural change and diversity during the Palaeolithic. The contributing authors are directly involved in this effort and the material presented includes novel approaches and findings. Chapters explain how learning strategies in combination with social and demographic factors (e.g., population size and mobility patterns) predict cultural evolution in a world without the printing press, television or the Internet. Also addressed is the inverse problem of how learning strategies may be inferred from actual trajectories of cultural change, for example as seen in the North American Palaeolithic. Mathematics and statistics, a sometimes necessary part of theory, are explained in elementary terms where they appear, with details relegated to appendices. Full citations of the relevant literature will help the reader to further pursue any topic of interest.

The Lower to Middle Palaeolithic Transition in Northwestern Europe

The present volume offers a comprehensive report on the site, dated to around 280,000 years ago, set against a wider northwestern European context.

The Lower to Middle Palaeolithic Transition in Northwestern Europe

A well‐preserved early Middle Palaeolithic site set against a wider northwestern European context The shift from Lower to Middle Palaeolithic in northwestern Europe (dated to around 300,000–250,000 years ago) remains poorly understood and underexplored compared to more recent archaeological transitions. During this period, stone tool technologies underwent significant changes but the limited number of known sites and the general low spatio‐temporal resolution of the archaeological record in many cases has impeded detailed behavioural inferences. Brickyard‐quarrying activities at Kesselt‐Op de Schans (Limburg, Belgium) led to the discovery and excavation of a well‐preserved early Middle Palaeolithic level buried beneath a 10 m thick loess-palaeosol sequence. The present volume offers a comprehensive report on the site, dated to around 280,000 years ago, set against a wider northwestern European context. An in‐depth study of the lithic assemblage, including an extensive refitting analysis, provides detailed information on the technological behaviour of prehistoric hominins in the Meuse basin during this crucial time period. Contributors: Jozef J. Hus (Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium), Frank Lehmkuhl (RWTH Aachen University), Erik P.M. Meijs (ArcheoGeoLab), Philipp Schulte (RWTH Aachen University), Ann Van Baelen (KU Leuven and University of Cambridge), Philip Van Peer (KU Leuven), Joerg Zens (RWTH Aachen University)

The Use of Clay in the Upper Palaeolithic of Europe

This volume surveys the use of clay in Upper Palaeolithic Europe, arguing that alongside better studied media, clay was used a material for symbolic expression.

The Use of Clay in the Upper Palaeolithic of Europe

This volume surveys the use of clay in Upper Palaeolithic Europe, arguing that alongside better studied media, clay was used a material for symbolic expression. Bougard identifies two cultural contexts with traditions of using clay, one in Moravia during the Gravettian period, and the other in the French Pyrenees during the Magdalenian. These are studied in depth, with analysis of what they can tell us about the social relations of production and about the transmission of knowledge, and quite different conclusions drawn about the two regions being studied.

Lower Palaeolithic Small Tools in Europe and the Levant

This volume (bringing together the current knowledge on a topic that includes the oldest hunting weapons known in the world: the Schöningen (Lower Saxony, Germany) wooden spears) includes the 15 papers that were prepared for the Workshop.

Lower Palaeolithic Small Tools in Europe and the Levant

Fifteen papers taken from a workshop held in Liege in 2001 aimed at bringing together those researching microlith industries from across Europe. Whilst new ideas and new data are presented in most papers, the most significant outcome of this exchange of ideas was the opportunity to assess technological and stylistic similarities between assemblages among case studies from Poland, Germany, Hungary, Israel, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and China. Papers in English.