Passenger Liners from Germany, 1816-1990

Passenger Liners from Germany, 1816-1990

Throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, German passenger liners carried their cargoes throughout the European waterways and transported millions of emigrants to New York to find places of opportunity in America. This fully illustrated book covers the development of these ships from paddle steamers on rivers and lakes to the great car ferries and dream ships of our time. Hansen weaves the fascinating development of this huge industry with over 300 photographs, many of them in color and never before published.

German Luxury Ocean Liners

From Kaiser Wilhelm Der Grosse to Aidastella

German Luxury Ocean Liners

Profusely illustrated history of German ocean liners and cruise ships.

Lost Voyages

Two Centuries of Shipwrecks in the Approaches to New York

Lost Voyages

Documents hundreds of nineteenth and twentieth century shipwrecks in and around New York's waters

Picture History of German and Dutch Passenger Ships

Picture History of German and Dutch Passenger Ships

Superbly illustrated volume documents long line of great ships — from "floating palaces" such as the Imperator (1913) and the Vaterland (1914) to such luxurious cruise ships as the Statendam (1957), Hamburg (1969), the remodeled Bremen (1990), and the new Deutschland (1998). 178 rare illustrations offer views of ships at sea and in ports.

Ocean Liners

An Illustrated History

Ocean Liners

Before the advent of the jet age, ocean liners were the principal means of transport around the globe, and carried migrants and business people, soldiers and administrators, families and lone travelers to every corner of the world. Though the ocean liner was born on the North Atlantic it soon spread to all the other oceans and in this new book the author addresses this huge global story. The account begins with Brunel's Great Eastern and the early Cunarders, but with the rise in nationalism and the growth in empires in the latter part of the 19th century, and the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869, the colonial powers of Spain, France and Germany soon established shipping lines of their own, and transpacific routes were opened up by Japanese and American lines. The golden age between the two world wars witnessed huge growth in liner traffic to Africa, Australia and New Zealand, India and the Far East, the French colonies and the Dutch East and West Indies, but then, though there was a postwar revival, the breakup of empires and the arrival of mass air travel brought about the swan song of the liner. Employing more than 250 stunning photographs, the author describes not just the ships and routes, but interweaves the technical and design developments, covering engines, electric light, navigation and safety, and accommodation. A truly unique and evocative book for merchant ship enthusiasts and historians.

The Economics of Shipbuilding in the United Kingdom

The Economics of Shipbuilding in the United Kingdom

This 1960 volume offers a description, in non-technical language, of the state of the British shipbuilding industry.

The Sea and Civilization

A Maritime History of the World

The Sea and Civilization

A monumental, wholly accessible work of scholarship that retells human history through the story of mankind's relationship with the sea. An accomplishment of both great sweep and illuminating detail, The Sea and Civilization is a stunning work of history that reveals in breathtaking depth how people first came into contact with one another by ocean and river, and how goods, languages, religions, and entire cultures spread across and along the world's waterways. Lincoln Paine takes us back to the origins of long-distance migration by sea with our ancestors' first forays from Africa and Eurasia to Australia and the Americas. He demonstrates the critical role of maritime trade to the civilizations of ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, and the Indus Valley. He reacquaints us with the great seafaring cultures of antiquity like those of the Phoenicians and Greeks, as well as those of India, Southeast and East Asia who parlayed their navigational skills, shipbuilding techniques, and commercial acumen to establish vibrant overseas colonies and trade routes in the centuries leading up to the age of European overseas expansion. His narrative traces subsequent developments in commercial and naval shipping through the post-Cold War era. Above all, Paine makes clear how the rise and fall of civilizations can be traced to the sea.

Cargo Liners

An Illustrated History

Cargo Liners

For 100 years, between 1850 and 1950, the cargo liner grew to dominate the world’s trade routes, providing regular services that merchants, shippers and importers could rely on; they carried much of the world’s higher value manufactured goods and raw materials and their services spread to most corners of the world. They were the tool of the world’s first phase of globalization. This new book, evocatively illustrated with a magnificent collection of more than 300 photographs, begins with the establishment of routes around Europe and across the North Atlantic in the 1850s. Not until the Liverpool ship owner and engineer, Alfred Holt, developed high-pressure compound engines were coal-powered vessels able to steam further afield, to the Far East and Australia. The opening of the Suez Canal in 1869 cemented the dominance of the cargo liner and only with the appearance of the first container ship in the 1950s was that dominance finally overthrown. With its informative introductory texts and abundant photographs, this book will appeal to ship enthusiasts around the world and to all those who mourn the passing of the golden age of the steamship.