Patriot vs Loyalist

Following the American Declaration of Independence, communities from Boston to Savannah were forced to make a choice: to strike out for an independent republic, or remain true to the British Crown.

Patriot vs Loyalist

Following the American Declaration of Independence, communities from Boston to Savannah were forced to make a choice: to strike out for an independent republic, or remain true to the British Crown. This study explores the origins, methods and combat record of the combatants on both sides. The American Revolutionary War was America's first civil war. As the conflict raged from Canada to the Caribbean and from India to Gibraltar, it was in American communities that the war was the most intimate, the most personal, and – accordingly – the most vicious. In 1775, the inhabitants of British America included those born in North America and newly arrived immigrants; the established landed aristocracy and the indigent; the diverse nations of the Native Americans; and people of African descent, both enslaved and free. The coming of war forced every person to make the choice of whether to side with the Patriots or remain loyal to the British Crown. With so many cross-cutting imperatives, the individual decisions made splintered communities, sometimes even households, turning neighbour against neighbour in an escalating spiral of ostracism, embargo, exile, raid, reprisal and counter-reprisal. Accordingly, the war on the frontiers and on the margins of conflict was as underhanded and ugly as any of the 21st century's insurgencies. In this study, the origins, fighting methods and combat effectiveness of the combatants fighting on both sides are assessed, notably in three significant clashes of the American Revolutionary War.

Patriots and Loyalists

This book explores why family, friends, and neighbors in the colonies became divided during the birth of a new a nation. Primary sources from the era and helpful images help readers make meaningful connections with the text.

Patriots and Loyalists

The American Revolutionary War pitted the colonial Patriots, who wanted independence from Great Britain and King George III, against the British Loyalists in North America. Some of the most well-known Patriots included future presidents of the United States, such as George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and John Adams. It featured prominent Founding Fathers such as Benjamin Franklin, Samuel Adams, John Hancock, and others. This book explores why family, friends, and neighbors in the colonies became divided during the birth of a new a nation. Primary sources from the era and helpful images help readers make meaningful connections with the text.

Clara Loyalist Or Patriot

Her ancestors came to Upper Canada in the late 1700's and fought to keep that part of the country Loyalist. This is her third book about Loyalists and this time includes the Patriot struggles of 1837.

Clara Loyalist Or Patriot

Clara must drive the horse and wagon as fast as possible to escape the fighting near their home. Having left her home in Ireland to find a better life and then losing her parents to cholera, Clara once again sees her life possibly changing for the worse. She still isn't sure whether it is better to remain a Loyalist or become a Patriot. Barbara Nattress enjoys writing about the struggles experienced by the people who came from other countries to settle Canada. Her ancestors came to Upper Canada in the late 1700's and fought to keep that part of the country Loyalist. This is her third book about Loyalists and this time includes the Patriot struggles of 1837. Dreams in The Mist and Hannah's Search retell the hardships of Loyalists during the War of 1812.

Black Patriots and Loyalists

Black Patriots and Loyalists contends that the struggle for emancipation was not only basic to the Revolution itself, but was a rousing force that would inspire freedom movements like the abolition societies of the North and the black ...

Black Patriots and Loyalists

We commonly think of the American Revolution as simply the war for independence from British colonial rule. But, of course, that independence actually applied to only a portion of the American population—African Americans would still be bound in slavery for nearly another century. Alan Gilbert asks us to rethink what we know about the Revolutionary War, to realize that while white Americans were fighting for their freedom, many black Americans were joining the British imperial forces to gain theirs. Further, a movement led by sailors—both black and white—pushed strongly for emancipation on the American side. There were actually two wars being waged at once: a political revolution for independence from Britain and a social revolution for emancipation and equality. Gilbert presents persuasive evidence that slavery could have been abolished during the Revolution itself if either side had fully pursued the military advantage of freeing slaves and pressing them into combat, and his extensive research also reveals that free blacks on both sides played a crucial and underappreciated role in the actual fighting. Black Patriots and Loyalists contends that the struggle for emancipation was not only basic to the Revolution itself, but was a rousing force that would inspire freedom movements like the abolition societies of the North and the black loyalist pilgrimages for freedom in Nova Scotia and Sierra Leone.

The Patriot and the Loyalist

Completing his three years in the Continental Army, Daniel Reid still has no desire to return home—not after losing the woman he loves to a British Captain—so he volunteers to ride south through enemy lines and deliver a message to ...

The Patriot and the Loyalist

Completing his three years in the Continental Army, Daniel Reid still has no desire to return home—not after losing the woman he loves to a British Captain—so he volunteers to ride south through enemy lines and deliver a message to Colonel Francis Marion, the Swamp Fox. With his temper needing a release and a dark haired beauty finding her way into his broken heart, Daniel decides to join the Swamp Fox's efforts against the British. Little does he know the British still have the upper hand. Lydia Reynolds has learned that love comes at a price, and she refuses to pay. Better to close her heart to everything and everyone. When her brother-in-law won't grant her passage to England, where she hopes to hide from her pain, New Englander, Daniel Reid, becomes her only hope—if she can induce him to give her information about the notorious Swamp Fox and his troops. When the British grow impatient and Daniel evades her questions, Lydia must decide how far to take her charade. The poor man, already gutted by love, hasn't grown as wise as she. Or so she supposes… Until the truth is known, the muskets are loaded…and it is time to decide where true loyalties lie.

Second Lieutenant Wright Wall

After more than eight years of research, the author addresses a number of questions about the lieutenant: - Who exactly was 2nd Lieutenant Wright Wall? - When was Lieutenant Wright Wall born?

Second Lieutenant Wright Wall

The history and family lineage of 2nd Lieutenant Wright Wall of South Carolina in the American Revolution has been an enigma to his descendants and genealogists. After more than eight years of research, the author addresses a number of questions about the lieutenant: - Who exactly was 2nd Lieutenant Wright Wall? - When was Lieutenant Wright Wall born? - Did Lieutenant Wright Wall have a father also named Wright? (In other words, was Lieutenant Wright Wall "Junior"?) - Whom did the American Revolutionary Lieutenant Wright Wall marry? - What were the relations between the South Carolina and Alabama Wright Walls? - Did Lieutenant Wright Wall, after going to the Mississippi Territory in 1810, remain in Mississippi or Alabama or did he return home to South Carolina, for burial next to his wife? The most serious question concerns the loyalty of Lieutenant Wright Wall to the American cause: Did Lieutenant Wright Wall serve as a captain in Colonel Robert Gray's Loyalist South Carolina regiment, Lower Pee Dee River Region, during parts of 1781 and 1782?

Patriots Loyalists and Revolution in New York City 1775 1776

Part of the Reacting to the Past series, Patriots, Loyalists, and Revolution in New York City, 1775-76 draws students into the political and social chaos of a revolutionary New York City, where Patriot and Loyalist forces argued and fought ...

Patriots  Loyalists  and Revolution in New York City  1775 1776

Part of the Reacting to the Past series, Patriots, Loyalists, and Revolution in New York City, 1775-76 draws students into the political and social chaos of a revolutionary New York City, where Patriot and Loyalist forces argued and fought for advantage among a divided populace. Students engage with the ideological foundations of revolution and government through close readings of Locke, Paine, and other contemporary arguments. Each student's ultimate victory goal is to have his/her side in control of New York City at the end of 1776 (not as of the end of the Revolution, when all know who won), as well as to achieve certain individual goals (e.g., slaves can attain freedom, propertied women can be granted voting rights, laborers can make deals for land). Winning requires the ability to master the high politics arguments for and against revolution as well as the low political skills of logrolling, bribery, and threatened force. Military force often determines the winner, much to the surprise of the students who concentrated merely on internal game politics.

Aaron Lopez Patriot Or Loyalist

Aaron Lopez  Patriot Or Loyalist

Describes merchant's problems caused by the embargo, the capture of his ship Hope by Connecticut privateers, and his claims for compensation.

Generous Enemies

Making use of family letters, diaries, memoirs, soldier pensions, Loyalist claims, committee and church records, and newspapers, this compelling social history tells the story of the American Revolution with a richness of human detail.

Generous Enemies

In July 1776, the final group of more than 130 ships of the Royal Navy sailed into the waters surrounding New York City, marking the start of seven years of British occupation that spanned the American Revolution. What military and political leaders characterized as an impenetrable "Fortress Britannia"—a bastion of solid opposition to the American cause—was actually very different. As Judith L. Van Buskirk reveals, the military standoff produced civilian communities that were forced to operate in close, sustained proximity, each testing the limits of political and military authority. Conflicting loyalties blurred relationships between the two sides: John Jay, a delegate to the Continental Congresses, had a brother whose political loyalties leaned toward the Crown, while one of the daughters of Continental Army general William Alexander lived in occupied New York City with her husband, a prominent Loyalist. Indeed, the texture of everyday life during the Revolution was much more complex than historians have recognized. Generous Enemies challenges many long-held assumptions about wartime experience during the American Revolution by demonstrating that communities conventionally depicted as hostile opponents were, in fact, in frequent contact. Living in two clearly delineated zones of military occupation—the British occupying the islands of New York Bay and the Americans in the surrounding countryside—the people of the New York City region often reached across military lines to help friends and family members, pay social calls, conduct business, or pursue a better life. Examining the movement of Loyalist and rebel families, British and American soldiers, free blacks, slaves, and businessmen, Van Buskirk shows how personal concerns often triumphed over political ideology. Making use of family letters, diaries, memoirs, soldier pensions, Loyalist claims, committee and church records, and newspapers, this compelling social history tells the story of the American Revolution with a richness of human detail.

The American Revolution

Offers opposing viewpoints regarding the American Revolution, including prewar disputes, patriot versus loyalist views, wartime concerns, and debate among modern historians.

The American Revolution

Offers opposing viewpoints regarding the American Revolution, including prewar disputes, patriot versus loyalist views, wartime concerns, and debate among modern historians.

The Battles of Lexington and Concord

Patriots vs. Loyalists In 1775 , only about one - third of all colonists were Patriots in support of independence from Britain . People who were loyal to the British government were called Tories or Loyalists .

The Battles of Lexington and Concord

Discusses the events that led the British and the colonists in America to clash in the Battles of Lexington and Concord. Describes the actions of both the Patriots and the British on April 19, 1775, when the battles that began the American Revolution occurred.

Braver Than You and I Stories of Loyalists Patriots the Continental Congress Soldiers and the Valley Forge American Revolution Grades 3 5 U S Revolution Founding History

In this ebook, you will get the chance to study the stories of loyalists, patriots and soldiers. You will also read about the Continental Congress and the interesting story of the Valley Forge.

Braver Than You and I   Stories of Loyalists  Patriots  the Continental Congress  Soldiers and the Valley Forge   American Revolution Grades 3 5   U S  Revolution   Founding History

History is influenced by the decisions and actions of people in certain eras and environments. In this ebook, you will get the chance to study the stories of loyalists, patriots and soldiers. You will also read about the Continental Congress and the interesting story of the Valley Forge. How different would the US history be if decisions were made and actions were done differently?

U S Military History For Dummies

Many of these people were passive supporters who provided intelligence, food, clothing, or liquor to patriot soldiers. Patriots came from all regions, ... Those who remained loyal to Great Britain were called Loyalists or Tories.

U S  Military History For Dummies

Want to know more about American military history? U.S. Military History For Dummies presents concise and revealing accounts of all of the nation's armed conflicts from the French and Indian War to Iraq. It explains how the U.S. military is organized and how its branches operate, both independently and together. This straightforward guide examines the causes for each of America's wars and reveals how these conflicts have shaped the nation's borders, society, politics, culture, and future. You'll meet heroes, cowards, patriots, and traitors; relive great battles; and get a taste of what combat is really like, as you discover: How the French/Indian war sowed the seeds of the Revolutionary War Why America's battle for independence didn't end at Yorktown Early U.S. wars against Indians, tax cheats, and pirates The War of 1812: guaranteeing U.S. sovereignty "Manifest Destiny" wars that stretched America from sea to shining sea Why the American Civil War could not be avoided The Spanish American War and the U.S. as an emerging global power Why World War I failed to "make the world safe for democracy" How World War II changed America's role in the world Korea and Vietnam: hot wars during the Cold War Featuring important insights on technological, political, and social changes that transformed the way America fights its wars U.S. Military History For Dummies is your key to understanding the evolution of the most powerful military force in history.

Colonial America

Loyalist or Patriot ? PARTY PLANS ABIGAIL BERNARD , 1773 My father's in a fury . And so are all his friends . England treats us like we're chattel to use for its own ends . England thinks that we Colonials have no right to make choices ...

Colonial America

Complete resource guide helps children understand Colonial American life with hands-on activities, maps, photos and more reproducible items. Full-color poster included.

Historical Dictionary of the American Revolution

Most of the battles between May and August 1780 essentially were Patriot vs. Loyalist militia units struggling for control of the backcountry, as British regulars seized key points such as Ninety-Six and Camden. Following the Patriot ...

Historical Dictionary of the American Revolution

This greatly expanded second edition of the Historical Dictionary of the American Revolution covers more battles, skirmishes, and raids of the American Revolution than any other printed source. This is done through a chronology, an introductory essay, maps and photos, a bibliography, and over 1000 cross-referenced dictionary entries.

Historypalooza

vS. PaTRIOT. Hey, Patriot! It's important to stay loyal to our king! Hey, Loyalist! There are unfair laws and acts with everything! Hey, Patriot! You better pay your taxes—it's an abomination! Hey, Loyalist! We will not pay those taxes ...

Historypalooza

Historypalooza is a collection of prehistoric and American history poems. Each rhyming poem has a catchy title and focuses on a specific history topic. Children in the elementary and middle grades will enjoy reading these fun poems, while simultaneously learning history. Author Franny Vergo sparks a love for history in children with her creative and intriguing history poetry.

Battle at Lindley s Mill

Loyalist versus Patriot Whigs or Patriots were those residents who sided for independence from English rule. The Loyalist or Tory was a resident that remained loyal to the Crown, and actually fought with or for the British side of the ...

Battle at Lindley s Mill

This booklet documents the Battle of Lindley's Mill located in North Carolina, during the Revolutionary War. This historical battle, a 4 hour fight (very long for Rev. War) occurred to free Gov. Burke who was captured along with 200 residents of Hillsborough, by nasty Tory David Fanning. **UPDATED ** from additional research from Pension records. More work continues on this battle, but this new version documents more of the varrying information - which shows the difficutly in confirm EXACT information, although some authors will pick what they feel is best - I leave it to the reader to decide. * Updated * to include Edmund Fanning to David Fanning letters, and British Maj Craig's letters dealing with Burke, Fanning, and Butler's forces! Also a lot of the Lindley Family deed records and more family information.

Focus On U s History

WORKSHEET 5 Date Loyalist or Patriot ? In the years leading up to the American Revolution , people who thought the colonies should remain tied to England were called Loyalists . They were loyal to the king .

Focus On U s  History

Reproducible student activities cover The Revolutionary War, its effects on society, and the evolution of American government.