Paul a New Covenant Jew

Includes bibliographical references (pages 255-282) and indexes.

Paul  a New Covenant Jew

After the landmark work of E. P. Sanders, the task of rightly accounting for Paul's relationship to Judaism has dominated the last forty years of Pauline scholarship. Pitre, Barber, and Kincaid argue that Paul is best viewed as a new covenant Jew, a designation that allows the apostle to be fully Jewish, yet in a manner centered on the person and work of Jesus the Messiah. This new covenant Judaism provides the key that unlocks the door to many of the difficult aspects of Pauline theology. Paul, a New Covenant Jew is a rigorous, yet accessible overview of Pauline theology intended for ecumenical audiences. In particular, it aims to be the most useful and up to date text on Paul for Catholic Seminarians. The book engages the best recent scholarship on Paul from both Protestant and Catholic interpreters and serves as a launching point for ongoing Protestant-Catholic dialogue.

Paul a New Covenant Jew

The book engages the best recent scholarship on Paul from both Protestant and Catholic interpreters and serves as a launching point for ongoing Protestant-Catholic dialogue.

Paul  a New Covenant Jew

After the landmark work of E. P. Sanders, the task of rightly accounting for Paul's relationship to Judaism has dominated the last forty years of Pauline scholarship. Pitre, Barber, and Kincaid argue that Paul is best viewed as a new covenant Jew, a designation that allows the apostle to be fully Jewish, yet in a manner centered on the person and work of Jesus the Messiah. This new covenant Judaism provides the key that unlocks the door to many of the difficult aspects of Pauline theology. Paul, a New Covenant Jew is a rigorous, yet accessible overview of Pauline theology intended for ecumenical audiences. In particular, it aims to be the most useful and up to date text on Paul for Catholic Seminarians. The book engages the best recent scholarship on Paul from both Protestant and Catholic interpreters and serves as a launching point for ongoing Protestant-Catholic dialogue.

PAUL A NEW COVENANT JEW

The book engages the best recent scholarship on Paul from both Protestant and Catholic interpreters and serves as a launching point for ongoing Protestant-Catholic dialogue.

PAUL  A NEW COVENANT JEW

After the landmark work of E.P. Sanders, the task of rightly accounting for Paul's relationship to Judaism has dominated the last forty years of Pauline scholarship. Pitre, Barber, and Kincaid argue that Paul is best viewed as a new covenant Jew, a designation that allows the apostle to be fully Jewish, yet in a manner centered on the person and work of Jesus the Messiah. This new covenant Judaism provides the key that unlocks the door to many of the difficult aspects of Pauline theology. Paul, a New Covenant Jew is a rigorous, yet accessible overview of Pauline theology intended for ecumenical audiences. In particular, it aims to be the most useful and up to date text on Paul for Catholic Seminarians. The book engages the best recent scholarship on Paul from both Protestant and Catholic interpreters and serves as a launching point for ongoing Protestant-Catholic dialogue.

The New Perspective on Paul

[(The New Perspective on Paul)] [By (author) James D G Dunn] published on (January, 2008) by James D G Dunn (2008).

The New Perspective on Paul

This collection of essays highlights a dimension of Paul's theology of justification that has been neglected ? that his teaching emerged as an integral part of his understanding of his commission to preach the gospel to non-Jews and that his dismissal of justification by works of the law was directed not so much against Jewish legalism but rather against his fellow Jews' assumption that the law remained a dividing wall separating Christian Jews from Christian Gentiles. James Dunn seeks to carry forward the debate on Jewish soteriology, on the relation of justification by faith to judgment according to works, on Christian fulfillment of the law, and on the crucial role of Christ, his death and resurrection. Full of detail and intriguing thought, Dunn's collection will enlighten any scholar of the New Testament.

Bund und Tora

Bund und Tora


Jewish Identity in the Greco Roman World

The book addresses critical issues of the formation and development of Jewish identity in the late Second Temple period. How could Jewish identity be defined? What about the status of women and the image of 'others'?

Jewish Identity in the Greco Roman World

The book addresses critical issues of the formation and development of Jewish identity in the late Second Temple period. How could Jewish identity be defined? What about the status of women and the image of 'others'? And what about its ongoing influence in early Christianity?

The New Covenant Prophecy

The New Covenant Prophecy tells the very personal, real-life story of a Jewish believer who believes that Yeshua (Jesus) is the Jewish Messiah.

The New Covenant Prophecy

Absorbing the Old with the New “The time is coming declares the L-rd, when I will make a New Covenant with the house of Israel…I will put my laws in their minds and write it on their hearts” (Jeremiah 31:31-33). The New Covenant Prophecy tells the very personal, real-life story of a Jewish believer who believes that Yeshua (Jesus) is the Jewish Messiah. His fascinating background includes being born in London into a wealthy Jewish family, parental divorce, anti-Semitism, and a supernatural spiritual experience when a Voice told him that he was loved and would be used to minister to God’s people. Jews, Messianic Jews, Christians, and nonbelievers alike will be enthralled with the intriguing details of his life in England and the United States—not only what was going on spiritually but also his keen mind for business-building and entrepreneurship. Written from a Messianic perspective, the author shares his spiritual discoveries in sensitive yet exciting ways that reveal the Good News of Yeshua so Jewish people can better understand the New Covenant—and Gentile believers can better understand the Church’s reconnection to Israel in the last days.

Constructing a New Covenant

Revised version of the author's thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Chicago, 2006.

Constructing a New Covenant

Revised version of the author's thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Chicago, 2006.

The New Covenant on Trial

It is not an untold story, but is seldom heard from the perspective of Christian doctrine. This book seeks to provide the evidence that the Church of Rome strayed from the way of the Messiah and has taught others to do the same.

The New Covenant on Trial

What if Replacement Theology, as has been taught in Christian circles for nearly two millennia is, in fact, a Christian myth? What if the doctrine developed by the Church of Rome in those early years, was built not in concert with what was taught by the Jewish Apostles, but in opposition by the Gentile converts? What if Paul’s attempts to make sense of how the new era in Christ could be explained to both Jew and Gentile, whilst allowing each to remain as called, was subsequently misinterpreted? What if the middle-wall of separation that the Messiah sought to tear down, was put back up again as a result of a schism between the Gentile and the Jew, with neither party quite getting it right? Putting The New Covenant on Trial, the author seeks to understand how the long-standing cultural differences between Jew and Gentile led to not simply a new covenant, but to a Replacement Covenant. Paul taught inclusion theology, the Gentile joining with the Jew, being nourished from the original vine. For centuries the Jews had excluded the Gentiles unless they agreed to become proselytes, non-Jewish Jews in a religious sense. Eventually with the centre of the religion moving from Jerusalem to Rome, and Hebraic thought patterns replaced with the Hellenic thought patterns of the now majority Gentile congregation, inclusion theology was turned on its head. Replacement theology became exclusion theology for Jews, and the iron hand of Rome began the persecutions that have existed to this day. This sounds like fiction, but it is not. It is not an untold story, but is seldom heard from the perspective of Christian doctrine. This book seeks to provide the evidence that the Church of Rome strayed from the way of the Messiah, and has taught others to do the same.

Paul Servant of the New Covenant

Developed over thirty years, Scott Hafemann's close reading of Paul's arguments, with an eye toward their OT/Jewish milieu, also advances the larger thesis that the various Israel/church, works/faith, and justification/judgment polarities ...

Paul  Servant of the New Covenant

Taking 2 Cor 3:6 as its starting point, the new and updated essays here assembled investigate the key passages in Romans, 1-2 Corinthians, Galatians, and Philippians in which the covenant content and eschatological context of Paul's theology interpret one another. Developed over thirty years, Scott Hafemann's close reading of Paul's arguments, with an eye toward their OT/Jewish milieu, also advances the larger thesis that the various Israel/church, works/faith, and justification/judgment polarities in Paul's thinking do not represent a material contrast between a "law-way" and a "gospel-way" of relating to God. Rather, they epitomize an eschatological contrast between the character of God's people within the two eras of salvation history in which, by virtue of the Messiah and the Spirit, the Torah of the "old covenant" is now being kept in the "new."

Re membering the New Covenant at Corinth

Emmanuel Nathan argues that Paul reconfigured traditions and memories shaping the identity of his community at Corinth." --back cover

Re membering the New Covenant at Corinth

Emmanuel Nathan's study is driven by the hermeneutical question of whether the covenantal contrasts in 2 Cor 3, in which Paul's use of 'new covenant' in 2 Cor 3:6 is set in stark polemical antithesis to an 'old covenant' (2 Cor 3:14), lie at the origin of the later Christian self-understanding as members of a new covenant that replaced the old. In other words, can Paul be said to be the founder of formative 'Christianity', even if one nuances the term 'Christianity' as a sect within the Judaisms of Paul's time? Using social memory theory, the author reframes the larger question of Paul's continuity or discontinuity with Judaism and seeks instead to examine the ways in which Paul refracted, redeployed, and reconfigured existing traditions in service of local needs, among them the formation and transformation of character among his community at Corinth.

The New Covenant in Hebrews

When the New Covenant in Hebrews is compared with the same idea in the Dead Sea Scrolls, in Paul and in the Last Supper accounts, the independence and originality of the author of Hebrews become evident.

The New Covenant in Hebrews

In Hebrews the New Covenant concept is the key to the author's hermeneutical scheme. When the New Covenant in Hebrews is compared with the same idea in the Dead Sea Scrolls, in Paul and in the Last Supper accounts, the independence and originality of the author of Hebrews become evident. His cultic reinterpretation of the New Covenant concept allows him to depict the Christ event in continuity with its Levitical heritage, through the shared rubrics of high priest, bloody sacrifice and tent. His simultaneous stress on the new, heavenly character of the New Covenant is designed to convince his readers of its surpassing effectiveness and definitive superiority.

1 Corinthians

This is a must-read for those who want to understand the Corinthian situation and Paul's response in a new way.

1 Corinthians

This compact commentary on 1 Corinthians is both readable and full of insights that will engage students, ministers, and scholars alike. The Apostle Paul writes to a relatively new church in which members are failing to maintain solidarity with other members. They struggle to find their unique place in Roman society as Gentile followers of Jewish leaders that proclaim Christ as Lord. Their many problems include competition over leadership and social prestige, sexual impropriety, household conflicts, idol foods, table fellowship, protocols on gender and the use of spiritual gifts, and confusion about death, immortality, and Christ's return. Oropeza addresses Paul's response to these and other issues as he engages ancient biblical, Jewish, and Greco-Roman sources along with recent scholarship. This is a must-read for those who want to understand the Corinthian situation and Paul's response in a new way.

Meet Paul Again for the First Time

Based on a reappraisal of first-century Judaism, recognition of the pagan targets of Paul’s mission, and an appreciation for Paul’s skill as a Greco-Roman rhetorician and interpreter of Jewish scripture, Meet Paul Again brings ...

Meet Paul Again for the First Time

This bold, new look at the apostle Paul will challenge longtime thinking about the “apostle to the gentiles.” Unfortunately, common misperceptions and outdated characterizations continue to prevail in mainstream teaching and preaching about Paul. Meet Paul Again for the First Time introduces readers to a brand-new Paul which, as it turns out, was the original Paul all along. With clarity and purpose, Clausen rejects unfounded preconceptions about the apostle. For example, he did not teach a “law-free gospel,” he did not reject Judaism or the law, and he did not see himself as a miserable sinner who found forgiveness only in Christ. Based on a reappraisal of first-century Judaism, recognition of the pagan targets of Paul’s mission, and an appreciation for Paul’s skill as a Greco-Roman rhetorician and interpreter of Jewish scripture, Meet Paul Again brings consistency and clarity to critical Pauline concepts including the new covenant, works of the law, preservation and deliverance, the future of Israel, and the status of gentiles in God’s family. Paul’s was a mission of inclusiveness. His primary objective was to preserve sinning gentiles from God’s wrath, and welcome them in worship beside their Jewish brothers and sisters, before the imminent arrival of the great and terrible Day of the Lord.

Returning Home

This work forges a new line of research on the problem of contextual disruption through an examination of the Old Testament traditions used within the fragment (their source, redactional focus and theology).

Returning Home

The text of 2 Cor. 6.14-7.1, commonly called the 'fragment', has been the focus of much debate, due largely to its enigmatic presence within the context of 2.14-7.4. This work forges a new line of research on the problem of contextual disruption through an examination of the Old Testament traditions used within the fragment (their source, redactional focus and theology). Next, a similar traditions study is pursued in the current literary context of 2.14-7.4. A surprising degree of continuity between the fragment and its context is discovered in the use of Old Testament traditions, particularly those relating to new covenant and second exodus (exilic return) traditions. From this investigation a contextual hypothesis is proposed, along with a critique of competing contextual theories. The book concludes with two appendices which apply the contextual hypothesis to the crucial interpretative issue in 6.14a. Although the author's contextual hypothesis is not dependent upon any one interpretative solution in 6.14a, it nonetheless offers some fresh insight into the questions of who the 'unbelievers' are and what the 'unequal yoke' is.>

Who Needs a New Covenant

Although covenant is a major theme in Hebrews, Morrison contends all mention of covenant can be deleted without damaging the coherence of the epistle or its christological conclusions.

Who Needs a New Covenant

Although covenant is a major theme in Hebrews, Morrison contends all mention of covenant can be deleted without damaging the coherence of the epistle or its christological conclusions. What role, then, does the covenant motif have in the epistle? The arguments in Hebrews are aimed at a Jewish audience--they ignore the needs and religious options relevant to Gentiles. For the readers, the Sinai covenant was the only relevant conceptual competitor to Christ. First-century Jews looked to the Abrahamic and Mosaic covenants as the basis of their obligations to God and God's promises toward them. Although most Jewish writers merged these covenants as if they were one, the author of Hebrews does not--he retains the Abrahamic promises while arguing that the Mosaic covenant is obsolete. The covenant concept supports the exhortations of Hebrews in two ways: 1) it provides the link between priesthood, worship rituals, and other laws, and 2) it enables the author to argue for allegiance to the community as allegiance to Christ.

The New Cambridge Companion to St Paul

In All Things to All Cultures: Paul among Jews, Greeks, and Romans, edited by Mark Harding and Alanna Nobbs, 84–102. ... New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2015. ... Paul, a New Covenant Jew: Rethinking Pauline Theology.

The New Cambridge Companion to St Paul

St Paul was a pivotal and controversial figure in the fledgling Jesus movement of the first century. The New Cambridge Companion to St Paul provides an invaluable entryway into the study of Paul and his letters. Composed of sixteen essays by an international team of scholars, it explores some of the key issues in the current study of his dynamic and demanding theological discourse. The volume first examines Paul's life and the first-century context in which he and his communities lived. Contributors then analyze particular writings by comparing and contrasting at least two selected letters, while thematic essays examine topics of particular importance, including how Paul read scripture, his relation to Judaism and monotheism, why his message may have been attractive to first-century audiences, how his message was elaborated in various ways in the first four centuries, and how his theological discourse might relate to contemporary theological discourse and ideological analysis today.

The New Covenant Does It Abolish God s Law

Inside this Bible study aid: - How Can We Obey God's Commandments? - Did the Ten Commandments Exist Before Moses? - God's Law: Is It a Burden or a Blessing? - What Was the Main Weakness of the Sinai Covenant?

The New Covenant  Does It Abolish God s Law

Does the New Covenant negate God's law and do away with any need to obey the Ten Commandments and other laws of God? The belief that it does has long been a popular teaching in traditional Christianity. Inside this Bible study aid: - How Can We Obey God's Commandments? - Did the Ten Commandments Exist Before Moses? - God's Law: Is It a Burden or a Blessing? - What Was the Main Weakness of the Sinai Covenant? - How God Balances Justice With Mercy - The Ten Commandments: Keys in a Law of Love - Grace and Law: Why Are They Inseparable? - Galatians 4:9-10: Are God's Laws Bondage? - The Holy Spirit: God's Promise of His Divine Help - Does Romans 14 Abolish Laws on Unclean Meats? - Did Paul Tell the Romans One Thing and the Corinthians the Opposite? - What Was 'Wiped Out' by Jesus Christ's Death? - Colossians 2:16-17: Are God's Laws Obsolete? - Confusion Over Legalism: What It Is and Isn't - Jesus' Teaching on God's Law - Did Paul's Words to the Galatians Contradict His Actions?